Gert churns up the Atlantic

Gert
Hurricane Gert is not going to pose any threat to land in Atlantic Canada according to the Canadian Hurricane Centre but it will be felt in the sea.

The swell from the Category 1 storm will move into the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia on Wednesday (16 August) and will persist into Thursday.

The swell will produce waves breaking up to three metres along parts of the coast and rip currents are likely.

Forecasters say Gert will not produce any rainfall for the region but the tropical moisture could feed into another low pressure system arriving later this week.

Much needed rain arrives

Heavy downpour during thunderstorm in NE Moncton, 11 Aug 2017 (Dearing)

A thunderstorm rolled through Greater Moncton on Friday afternoon and it was a welcome sight when two periods of downpours brought much needed rain.

A fire ban had been in place across Southern New Brunswick but more rain today lowered the fire hazard and burning is now allowed from 8pm to 8am.

The last significant rainfall in Greater Moncton was 8.2 mm on 21 July and prior to that it was 21.2 mm on 24 June.

Agriculture Canada has declared that much of Prince Edward Island is experiencing a drought with little rain since early June.

A heat wave named Lucifer

hoteuropeTemperatures across southern Europe have been so hot in recent days – climbing to more than 40 C in some areas – the heat wave has been called “Lucifer”.

Several deaths have been reported and severe weather warnings have been issued in Spain, France, Italy and the Balkan States.

Serbia’s capital Belgrade reached a scorching 39 C and train service in the southern part of the country was halted after rail tracks buckled in the extreme heat.

By contrast, northern Europe has been much cooler and wetter with the thermometer dropping as low as 4 C in the Scottish Highlands.

Rain… finally!

Location of forest fire, south of Riverview, NB (Google Maps)

Some much needed rain finally fell over parts of New Brunswick early this morning which helped firefighters who are battling a number of forest fires.

A fire about 3 km south of Riverview town limits is now considered “under control” and officials say the rain helped and ground crews are now focusing on hot spots.

The fire was reported on Saturday morning and was attacked by several water bombers and crews from the Department of Natural Resources, Riverview and Hillsborough.

A total of 15 fires are currently burning across the province which are being described as either “contained”, “under control” or “being patrolled”.

N.B. halts forestry operations amid extreme dryness

Tinder dry grass in west end Moncton, 03 Aug 2017 (Dearing)

Provincial officials say the fire hazard in New Brunswick is at its highest level in over 20 years.

A fire ban has been in place for days which means campers have to find other ways to roast marshmallows.

The province took a rare step today by restricting forestry operations during peak daytime hours.

Southeast New Brunswick currently has an extreme fire hazard and Greater Moncton has not recorded any significant rain since 21 July.

July 2017 – Warm and dry

Upper Salmon River, Alma, NB, 30 July 2017 (Dearing)


As the month of July progressed in Southeast New Brunswick, lawns turned brown and forests became extremely dry as temperatures soared with little rain fell. 

Greater Moncton only received one-third of its normal monthly rainfall and 15 days had no precipitation at all. 

The heat was steady throughout July with 20 days reaching 25 C or higher and four days climbing to 30 C or more. 

A brief cool down near month end lowered daytime highs to the low 20s C and brought a chilly overnight low of 6.9 C. 

JULY 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 26.0 C

Average LOW 12.3 C

AVERAGE 19.2 C (about 0.4 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 30.5 C (31 July)

Extreme LOW 6.9 C (23 July)

RAINFALL 30.0 mm (about 67 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Heat wave in the West

calgaryheat27july17

Cooling off in the Elbow River, SW Calgary, AB, 27 July 2017 (Postmedia/G. Young)

Environment Canada issued heat warnings for most of Alberta along with parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba this week in the wake of sizzling high temperatures.

The weather office says a daytime maximum of 30 C or higher could pose an elevated risk of heat-related illnesses and residents should avoid outdoor activities until cooler hours of the day.

Temperatures could climb to 33 C as far north as Thompson and almost 30 C in Churchill along the Hudson Bay coast.

Forecasters say the extreme heat will continue this weekend but a slight cool down is expected early next week.

Dry July in Southeast N.B.

Grass turning brown in NE Moncton, 26 July 2017 (Dearing)

Lawns are turning brown and gardens are thirsty in Southeast New Brunswick given the light amount of precipitation recorded so far this month.

Environment Canada says 29.8 mm of rain has fallen this July in Greater Moncton compared to an average of 92.1 mm – just under one-third of normal.

No significant rainfall is expected before the end of the month.

By contrast, parts of neighbouring Nova Scotia have been much wetter than normal with 135 mm to date at Halifax Stanfield Airport.

Unusual mid-summer cool snap

Sunset at Parlee Beach, NB, 18 July 2017 (Dearing)


Late July is typically the warmest period of summer in Greater Moncton but a recent cool down has brought September-like days and a record overnight low. 

On 23 July, the temperature fell to 6.9 C at the Greater Moncton International Airport which broke a record low of 7.2 C from 1962. 

A frost advisory was posted in northwest New Brunswick with a chilly low of 2.4 C in Edmundston. 

The short term forecast calls for more seasonal highs in the mid-20’s C and lows near 13 C. 

Heat wave abruptly ends in N.B.

Heavy rain during thunderstorm in NE Moncton, 21 July 2017 (Dearing)


The temperature climbed to 30 C for three days in a row in Greater Moncton which is an unofficial heat wave since 32 C is the maximum by definition.

Those warm daytime highs, 30.4 C (19 July), 30.4 C (20 July) and 30.0 C (21 July), still haven’t eclipsed the season-to-date maximum of 30.8 C recorded on 11 June.

A cold front moved west to east through New Brunswick yesterday triggering scattered thunderstorms with heavy rain, gusty winds and even hail.

The heat and humidity have been replaced by a cooler, drier air mass with highs in the low 20’s C which is slightly below normal for late July.