Summer departs with gusty winds

Hints of fall colours in west end Moncton, 20 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

The same storm system which brought severe weather to Ontario and Quebec – including tornadoes – crossed through New Brunswick overnight.

Strong low pressure caused gusty winds up to 72 km/h at the Greater Moncton International Airport which turned out to be the windiest day since 02 June.

A wind gust of 85 km/h was reported in Charlo.

NB Power said almost 10,000 customers lost power at the peak of the storm thanks to trees and branches falling on utility lines.

Incidentally, fall officially arrives later tonight with the autumnal equinox at 10:54 pm ADT.

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Tornadoes tear through Ottawa

Damage from a tornado in west end Ottawa, ON, 22 Sept 2018 (Instagram)

Environment Canada has confirmed two powerful tornadoes ripped through west end Ottawa before touching down again in Gatineau across the Ottawa River.

Officials say dozens were hurt and at least two residents are in hospital with critical injuries.

Tens of thousands were left without power after at least 80 utility poles either snapped or were damaged.

Meteorologists say severe thunderstorms spawned one twister classified as an EF-3 with winds up to 265 km/h while another tornado was an EF-2 with winds up to 220 km/h.

Tornadoes are not uncommon in Southern Ontario but storms of this strength are rare.

Summer to fall in two hours

The skyline of Moncton, NB, 16 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

An abrupt change in temperature thanks to a passing cold front turned summer quickly into fall in Greater Moncton this week.

On Tuesday, Environment Canada reports a temperature of 22°C at 11am which plummeted to 16°C by 1pm and the wind direction changed from the southeast to the northwest.

The long, hot summer in New Brunswick was suddenly over.

The daytime high on Wednesday was 13.6°C which was the coolest day since 25 June.

Forecasters are calling for near or slightly below seasonal temperatures until the end of the month (Normal high 18°C, normal low 7°C).

Florence creates historic flooding

florence

Fallen tree traps residents inside home, Wilmington, NC, USA, 15 Sept 2018 (ABC)

Since making landfall near Wilmington, North Carolina on Friday morning as a Category 1 hurricane, Florence has claimed at least 15 lives.

Strong winds have toppled trees trapping some and even killing others in their own homes.

Now a tropical depression, the storm has been dumping epic amounts of rain (800 mm or more) on North and South Carolina which has caused flash flooding as rivers and streams spill their banks.

First responders have rescued almost 1,000 residents from floodwaters while nearly one million are without power and tens of thousands have sought refuge in emergency shelters.

Many highways have been left impassable and officials are urging drivers to stay at home and off the roads.

Florence called a ‘monster’

More than two million residents have been evacuated as Hurricane Florence roars toward the Southeastern United States with sustained winds of more than 175 km/h.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the Category 2 storm is taking aim at North and South Carolina on Thursday.

A life threatening storm surge is expected along the Atlantic coast with an incredible 800 mm (30 inches) rain possible.

Emergency officials call Florence “a monster” and cities like Myrtle Beach have become eerily empty as the hurricane approaches.

September snow in Alberta!

Snow falls in Edmonton, AB, 12 Sept 2018 (Instagram)

Cold Arctic air has combined with moisture moving over the Rockies to give Alberta a taste of winter in late summer.

Forecasters say northern Alberta including Edmonton could receive at least 8 cm snow with up to 15 cm in Jasper.

Temperatures are hovering near or slightly below freezing with a plunge to -6°C in northern British Columbia.

Environment Canada says more seasonable weather is not expected to return until early next week.

Much needed rain arrives

The pond at Fairview Knoll Park, NE Moncton, 09 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

Courtesy of tropical depression Gordon making its way across Eastern Canada and the United States, much needed rain is falling in Southeast New Brunswick.

Prior to today, less than 8 mm rain has fallen this month in Greater Moncton.

The last significant rainfall was 18 August when a whopping 56 mm fell.

As much as 30 mm is being welcomed across the region.

Snow in South Africa

Giraffe in the snow, Sneeuberg, Eastern Cape, South Africa, 08 Sept 2018 (Facebook)

An intense cold front has gripped South Africa bringing snowfall to southwestern parts of the country.

Temperatures fell below freezing in the Cape Provinces.

More than 10 cm snow forced the closure of roads through some mountain passes in Eastern Cape when trucks got stranded.

Meantime, as much as 100 mm rain drenched the southern coast.

Keep in mind it is still winter in the Southern Hemisphere with spring officially arriving on 23 September.

A chilly start!

It may have been the warmest summer in the Maritimes in almost a century but some parts of the region woke up to below freezing temperatures and frost this morning!

That means some areas had a growing season which barely lasted 100 days since the last spring frost for many was 04 June.

Greater Moncton was definitely chilly with an early morning low of 3.0°C which was close to the record low of 1.1°C from 1956.

Here are some of the nippy overnight lows:

  • Edmundston, NB  -2.0°C
  • Woodstock, NB  -0.8°C
  • Red Pines, NB  -0.7°C
  • Fredericton, NB  0.1°C
  • Upper Stewiacke, NS  -0.4°C
  • Maple Plains, PEI  1.4°C

Where is Florence headed?

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is shifting into high gear as it often does this month.

Florence is the newest storm to pose a threat and the Category 3 storm is now churning toward Bermuda.

Some computer models are suggesting Florence could impact the U.S. Eastern Seaboard by the middle of next week.

Even if Florence stays out to sea, forecasters say numerous other systems are developing over the Atlantic as the hurricane season reaches its average peak on September 10th.