October 2015 – Mild days, cold nights

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)

Although it seemed relatively warm overall this October in Southeast New Brunswick, stats from Environment Canada show the average monthly temperature was actually below normal.

While daytime highs were mild, especially during the first half of the month, an autumn chill brought overnight lows well below freezing by late October dropping to a near record low of -6.2 C.

The fall foliage may have peaked a bit later this year – due to a dry late summer/early autumn – but strong winds from the remnants of Patricia brought down most leaves on the 29-30 October with gusts up to 82 km/h.

OCTOBER 2015 ALMANAC (at the Greater Moncton International Airport)

Average HIGH  12.2 C

Average LOW  1.6 C

AVERAGE  6.9 C (about 0.7 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 19.6 C (12 Oct)

Extreme LOW -6.2 C (27 Oct)

Rainfall 79 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada, 1981-2010)

Patricia remnants pound the Maritimes

Fall leaves barely cling to trees in west end Moncton, 28 Oct 2015 (Dearing)

Fall leaves barely cling to trees in west end Moncton, 28 Oct 2015 (Dearing)


What’s left of a recent hurricane that struck Mexico has made its way across the Maritimes after a brush with Ontario and Quebec.

The remnants of Patricia brought rain and winds gusting to at least 70 km/h.

Forecasters say strong winds across New Brunswick are creating rough surf along the coast especially the Bay of Fundy.

Up to 30 mm of rain is expected in Greater Moncton by the time the system moves away overnight.

The fall storm led to power outages with NB Power noting a peak of roughly 8,000 customers without electricity.

Patricia weakens across northern Mexico

Woman sweeps debris in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, 24 Oct 2015 (AP)

Woman sweeps debris in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, 24 Oct 2015 (AP)


Hurricane Patricia has weakened to a tropical storm but still poses a risk of floods and landslides across northern Mexico according to forecasters.

Patricia peaked as the strongest hurricane recorded in the Americas but winds decreased rapidly to 80 km/h as the storm moved over land.

Thousands of residents and tourists on Mexico’s Pacific coast were evacuated and moved inland.

Patricia is now moving north-northeastward inland over northern Mexico.

U.S officials are watching the storm as it approaches Texas with heavy rains expected to saturate the already drenched state

Patricia pounds Mexico’s Pacific coast

Satellite image of Hurricane Patricia, 23 Oct 2015 (courtesy CNN)

Satellite image of Hurricane Patricia, 23 Oct 2015 (courtesy CNN)


One of the strongest hurricanes in recorded history has slammed the Pacific coast of Mexico tonight.

The dangerous Category 5 storm made landfall near Cuixmala, about 85 kilometres west-northwest of the port city of Manzanillo.

Record wind speeds of 325 km/h measured earlier had fallen off somewhat to 270 km/h according to forecasters.

Residents and tourists sought shelter along a stretch of coastline dotted with fishing villages and beach resorts including Puerto Vallarta.

Patricia’s projected path will take it over mountainous terrain prone to dangerous flash floods and landslides.

Mild winter for Atlantic Canada – Accuweather

Accuweather2015-16winter
A strong El Nino and warmer than usual sea surface waters surrounding Atlantic Canada will lead to slightly warmer temperatures than usual this winter according to Accuweather.

The second half of the winter could turn snowy for New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

The milder conditions will favour more storms that initially bring snow but later change to ice or rain, especially across Nova Scotia.

Much of Newfoundland will experience a milder winter with fewer major storms.

First snow flurries of fall!

Crooked Creek Lookoff, Riverside-Albert, NB, 18 October 2015 (Dearing)

Crooked Creek Lookoff, Riverside-Albert, NB, 18 October 2015 (Dearing)


Much of New Brunswick either spotted snow flurries or even saw a slight accumulation of snow on the ground today thanks to the first Arctic chill of autumn.

On a leaf peeping drive along Route 114 between Moncton and Alma today, snow flurries mixed with rain were spotted at times in the early afternoon.

However, the sky eventually cleared as the day went on and it became a brisk fall day to say the least.

Environment Canada is forecasting that temperatures will climb into the mid-teens Celsius this week which is more typical for late October.

A killing frost!

Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)

Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)


The 2015 growing season is officially over in Greater Moncton.

A killing frost occurred overnight when the thermometer dipped to a low of -2.1 C which is the lowest value in Southeast New Brunswick since late April.

Temperatures were typically a bit colder in the northern part of the province, bottoming out at -5.0 C in Edmundston.

Fall colours near peak in SE

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)


In only the past week, the leaves in Southeast New Brunswick have turned to sharp hues of red, orange, yellow and gold.

The fall foliage typically nears its colour peak around Thanksgiving in the southern half of the province.

But due to a warm, dry summer in Greater Moncton and the lack of a killing frost so far this autumn, the annual show started a bit later than usual.

Forecasters say a sharp cool down is expected this weekend as an Arctic chill will keep daytime highs barely reaching 10 C and nights below freezing.

Hurricane Joaquin barrels across Atlantic

Flooding in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 04 Oct 2015 (AFP/Getty Images)

Flooding in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 04 Oct 2015 (AFP/Getty Images)

Apart from cloud cover over Nova Scotia and New Brunswick tonight, Hurricane Joaquin will have no impact on Atlantic Canada as it churns northeastward across the ocean.

Joaquin brushed past Bermuda yesterday as a Category 2 storm with winds up to 160 km/h after roaring across the Bahamas as a major Category 4 hurricane where a U.S. cargo ship disappeared with more than 30 crew aboard.

U.S. forecasters say the moisture-laden storm was also partially responsible for record rainfall of more than 300 mm in parts of South Carolina – several months’ worth of rain in only 24 hours.

Although models showed the remnants of Joaquin would make it to the United Kingdom, it looks like the storm will weaken but bring rain and strong winds to Portugal later this week.