December 2016 -Weather rollercoaster

moncton17dec

A cold late afternoon in downtown Moncton, 16 Dec 2016 (Facebook)

So many ups and downs occurred during December in Southeast New Brunswick, one might say we were riding a weather rollercoaster.

Early on 17 December in Greater Moncton, the thermometer fell to a monthly (and almost record) low of -22.1 C which then rose to a monthly high of 10.6 C only 36 hours later before eventually dropping again to -18.6 by late on 19 December.

Although many nights were extremely cold (eight below -15 C), daytime highs were often slightly above or below freezing which overall led to a slightly below average monthly temperature.

Most snow fell during the first half of the month (three snowfalls were 12 cm or higher) and although rainfall was below normal, overall precipitation was about average.

DECEMBER 2016 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  -0.8 C

Average LOW  -9.5 C

AVERAGE  -5.1 C (about 0.3 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH  10.6 C (18 December)

Extreme LOW  -22.1 C (17 December)

RAINFALL  37.5 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL  85.2 cm (about 25 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Advertisements

Damaging winds in latest storm

windy

Part of a trampoline blew into power lines, Quispamsis, NB, 30 Dec 2013 (NB Power/Twitter)


Strong winds with gusts of more than 100 km/h in parts of New Brunswick knocked out power to more than 20,000 customers at the peak of the storm.

The so-called “weather bomb” resulted after two low pressure systems – one from the west and the other from the south – merged over the Maritimes.

Nova Scotia got pounding rain, wind and rough surf while New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had a combination of snow, rain and gusty winds.

Greater Moncton received about 5 cm snow and 10 mm of rain along with wind gusts up to 89 km/h bringing down tree many branches.

Canada’s Top 10 of 2016

FtMcfire3

RCMP officer in burnt neighbourhood, Fort McMurray, AB, 05 May 2016 (Alberta RCMP)

From the horrible wildfires which destroyed parts of Fort McMurray, Alberta to the winter that wasn’t to a warm, dry summer which led to drought in areas of Eastern Canada, 2016 was certainly noteworthy for major weather events.

  1. Fort McMurray’s “Fire Beast”
  2. Super El Niño Cancels Winter – 2nd warmest Canada-wide ever
  3. August Long Weekend Storm on the Prairies… Big and Costly
  4. A Summer to Remember in the East
  5. November’s Heat Wave and December’s Deep Freeze
  6. Arctic Sea Ice Going, Going… Break-up earlier/Freeze-up later
  7. Wild Summer Prairie Weather
  8. A Tale of Two Springs – Cold East and Warm West
  9. Thanksgiving Day Atlantic Weather Bomb
  10. Southwest Ontario’s $100 Million September Gusher                                               (Courtesy Environment Canada)

Green Christmas in Nova Scotia

25dectrurons

Not exactly a White Christmas in Truro, NS, 25 Dec 2016 (Dearing)

While most of New Brunswick was covered in snow on 25 December, many parts of Nova Scotia including Truro had a Green Christmas Day.

While there were a couple of snow squalls during the day which produced a trace or so, it was mostly sunny with a strong, cold wind in central Nova Scotia.

As a child growing up in this area, having a White Christmas was always a toss up with some years being snowy while other years were rainy.

More white is on the way as a Colorado Low approaches from the American Midwest and Central Canada with a mixed bag of precipitation expected.

White Christmas guaranteed

24dec

For the first time since 2013, Southeast New Brunswick will have a White Christmas.

Although it was mild and rainy on Christmas Eve, not enough showers will fall to wash away the roughly 10 cm of lying snow in Greater Moncton.

Christmas Day is expected to be sunny with seasonal temperatures.

The only two parts of Canada that will not have a White Christmas are the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia and the Pacific coast of British Columbia.

Winter officially arrives

winter

Courtesy Accuweather.com

Winter unofficially arrived in Southeast New Brunswick a few weeks ago but it officially arrived today at 6:44am.

The winter solstice marks the shortest day and the longest night of the year.

In Greater Moncton on 21 December, the length of daylight is 8 hours, 37 minutes, 39 seconds.

The Sun is directly overhead of the Tropic of Capricorn and the days will continue to lengthen as it continues moving north toward the Tropic of Cancer.

Snow falls in Sahara Desert

saharasnow

Snow covers red sand dunes, Ain Sefra, Algeria, 19 Dec 2016 (Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson)

One of the hottest places on Earth has recorded a light snowfall for the first time in 37 years – since February 1979.

In the normally dry, hot Sahara desert, snow fell in the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria on 19 December.

The snow stayed for almost a day before it melted away.

A “Gateway to the Desert,” Ain Sefra is 1,078 metres above sea level and is surrounded by the Atlas Mountains.

Wild temperature swings!

snow16dec

Lots of snow for mid-December in Moncton, 16 Dec 2016 (Dearing)


On Saturday morning the temperature in Greater Moncton bottomed out at a frigid -22.1°C but by later in the evening it had climbed to -2°C.

The thermometer continued to rise on Sunday and a mild high of 10.6°C was recorded by late afternoon with heavy rain before another drop to -1°C by late in the evening with snow flurries.

Today the temperature is dropping as the day goes on and as of mid-morning sat at -13°C.

In a 48-hour period the temperature climbed more than 30 degrees C and then dropped again by 24 degrees C – one of the wildest temperature swings in recent memory.

Coldest weather in 40 years

moncton17dec

A cold late afternoon in downtown Moncton, 16 Dec 2016 (Facebook)

An Arctic air mass has lowered temperatures in Southeast New Brunswick to their coldest levels for mid-December since the early 1970s.

The thermometer dropped below -20°C  over the last two days in Greater Moncton settling at -22.1°C this morning with a bitter wind chill of -35.

The record for this date is -26.1°C from 1943.

Environment Canada is forecasting a sharp temperature rise overnight and tomorrow.

Extreme Cold Warning for N.B.

arcticairEnvironment Canada is advising on how to avoid frostbite and hypothermia with Southeast New Brunswick under an extreme cold warning.

A bitterly cold Arctic air mass will move across the province Thursday and into Friday.

Temperatures are expected to drop below -20°C by Friday morning with winds gusting from 40 to 60 km/h behind a deepening low pressure system.

Wind chill values are expected to fall below -35 for the early part of Friday.