Heavy rain hits Maritimes

Ominous sky over Jones Lake, Moncton, 04 June 2019 (Dearing)

A slow moving low pressure system crossed the Maritime Provinces on Friday bringing heavy rain to the region.

Environment Canada had posted rainfall warnings for many areas with 40 to 60 mm in southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and up to 100 mm in northern Nova Scotia.

Here are some rainfall totals (in mm):

  • Parrsboro, NS  123
  • Greenwood, NS  81
  • Kejumkujik NP, NS  72
  • Saint John, NB  61
  • Charlottetown, PEI  54
  • Summerside, PEI  53
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB  52
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, NS  41
  • Fredericton, NB  30
  • Yarmouth, NS  22
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Hello summer!

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 12:54 pm ADT and it was certainly welcome after a relentlessly cold spring.

Greater Moncton enjoyed 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight today but unfortunately the sun didn’t make an appearance due to lots of clouds and heavy rain.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will get shorter – ever so slowly starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions, The Weather Network is suggesting warmer than normal temperatures in July and into August with near normal precipitation.

Environment Canada is calling for near normal temperatures and near to slightly above normal precipitation.

When will it reach 30°C?

First 30
It’s been a cold spring in Greater Moncton and the thermometer didn’t reach 20°C until 25 May – so when will it hit 30°C?

According to Environment Canada, the average date since 2013 has ranged from mid-May to late June but mainly late May.

While June has been warmer to date in Southeast New Brunswick, the long range forecast is calling for cooler conditions.

Will we have to wait until July this year?

Thundersnow in B.C.!

A thunderstorm with snow is called thundersnow and it struck the British Columbia Interior just two days before the start of summer!

An unstable air mass bringing cold air from Alaska is to blame for the rare thundersnow which covered mountainous terrain in the Okanagan Valley with about 10 cm.

Snow fell above 1500 metres with a snow/rain mix down to 1100 metres and a chilly rain at sea level.

About 10 cm of snow was also expected in the Alberta Rockies from a similar system.

Severe weather in Manitoba, NW Ontario

tstorms
After a hot and windy day across southern Manitoba, severe thunderstorms developed late Friday afternoon with heavy rain, hail and lightning strikes causing at least one grass fire.

Daytime highs soared to 36.6°C in Winnipeg and 37.3°C in Carman which was the hot spot in Canada.

Temperatures dropped dramatically after the storms rolled through and damaging winds up to 100 km/h were reported in some areas along with nickel-sized hail.

The heat and thunderstorms moved east into northwestern Ontario with Kenora reaching 33.0°C yesterday and Armstrong climbing to 32.3°C today.

Spring 2019 in review

Spring 2019
Meteorological spring in Southeast New Brunswick turned out to be colder and much wetter than normal compared to the 30-year average.

While March and April both had above normal temperatures, May was colder by a significant 2.4 degrees which brought down the overall seasonal average.

Rainfall was heavy in April and May and while snowfall was below normal for the three month period, the final snow flurries were spotted as late as 21 May.

Tornado hits National Capital Region

 

A tornado developed about 10 kilometres southeast of Gatineau Airport, Quebec early Sunday evening.

The tornado moved east along the Ottawa River before coming ashore on the Ontario side.

In the suburban Ottawa neighbourhood of Orléans, strong winds brought down trees and removed shingles on many homes with one person reportedly injured.

A thunderstorm also produced 2 centimetre hail in the area.

Environment Canada says the tornado was a low end EF-1 suggesting peak winds of 135 km/h and had a path length of at least 25 kilometres.

Hurricane season begins

2018 hurricanes

Today marks the beginning of the 2019 hurricane season which will run until the end of November.

For a record fifth consecutive year, storm activity began before the 01 June official start date when Subtropical Storm Andrea formed on 20 May.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is forecasting a near normal season with 9–15 named systems, 4–8 hurricanes, and 2–4 major hurricanes.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre begins issuing statements when a storm is within three days of entering a response zone covering Eastern Canada and adjacent waters.

May 2019 – Miserable!

Irishtown Nature Park, Moncton, 20 May 2019 (Dearing)

May 2019 proved to be the coldest May since 1974 in the Maritimes with temperatures about two or three degrees below normal.

The month started out with some warmth in Greater Moncton but it turned colder near the middle with snow recorded as late as the 21st before a slight recovery at the end.

Overnight lows were cold with six nights either at or below freezing and most minimums were in the low single digits.

Cold, damp and cloudy weather stunted growth and forced farmers to delay planting because fields were saturated.

Only three days reached or exceeded 20°C and the thermometer came nowhere near 30°C at any time of the month.

MAY 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  13.4°C

Average LOW  1.8°C

AVERAGE  7.6°C (about 2.4 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH  22.1°C (25 May)

Extreme LOW  -2.7°C (02 May)

RAINFALL  105.8 mm (about 10 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL  0.8 cm (near normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Weather Network unveils summer forecast

TWN Summer 2019

After a cold and wet spring in New Brunswick, what will summer be like?

The Weather Network has unveiled its summer 2019 forecast and if you were hoping for warmer temperatures, it appears you may have to wait a little longer.

TWN suggests the season will be changeable and humid with cool weather in June but warmer than normal temperatures arriving in July stretching into August.

Extended periods of dry weather could lead to short term drought in parts of the Maritimes but overall precipitation will likely be near normal.

What about the spring 2019 forecast from The Weather Network?

TWN noted a cold wave in early March would be followed by a warmer pattern later in the month with more consistent spring-like weather by early April.

Both temperatures and precipitation were expected to be near normal.

So was the seasonal forecast accurate?

While early March was cold in Greater Moncton with a bitter low of -20.1 C, a warmer pattern never really developed except for a brief shot of warmth at month end.

April had some warmth in the middle but that fizzled near the end and while May started off strong, a cold pattern held steady for the second half of the month.

Precipitation was below seasonal in March, well above average in April and slightly above normal for May.