Windy start to November

Tree leaning on power lines, 01 Nov 2019 (NB Power)

Blustery but mild weather on Halloween continued throughout the first day of November in Southeast New Brunswick.

A cold front created strong winds with a sustained high of 64 km/h and a peak gust of 94 km/h at the Greater Moncton Airport.

Many trees and branches – already weakened by Dorian earlier this fall – came down onto power lines with NB Power dealing with almost 60,000 customers without electricity by late Friday.

Environment Canada warned of gusts up to 110 km/h in the Tantramar Marsh which forced the shutdown of the Trans Canada Highway between Amherst and Sackville until winds subsided.

The daytime high on 01 November was 19.4°C which was slightly warmer than the October maximum of 19.3°C.

The same storm system also hit Quebec where more than one million customers lost power, one man was killed by a falling tree and a canopy collapsed at a service station.

A Blustery Halloween!

Fallen leaves, Centennial Park, Moncton, 14 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Fewer trick or treaters are expected to be spooking neighbourhoods in Greater Moncton thanks to heavy rain and strong winds.

A low pressure system could bring at least 30 mm of rain to Southeast New Brunswick over the next 24 hours.

Potentially hurricane-strength winds are expected tomorrow ahead of a cold front but temperatures will be warm reaching the high teens.

Environment Canada has issued wind warnings with gusts from 60-90 km/h and possibly up to 110 km/h in the Tantramar Marsh.

Forecasters say the wind may cause damage to buildings such as to roof shingles and windows.

The wind may not die down until early Saturday.

Fading tropical storm batters Ontario

Courtesy Weather Nation

The remnants of Tropical Storm Olga were felt across Southern Ontario on the weekend with rainy and windy conditions.

Environment Canada says between 30 and 60 mm of rain fell across the region including the Greater Toronto Area.

Wind gusts were up to 80 km/h in some locations with a peak of 104 km/h recorded at Port Colborne on Lake Erie.

Olga formed in the Gulf of Mexico several days ago and made landfall in Louisiana before quickly churning northward toward the Great Lakes.

Forecasters are calling for more wet weather and cooler conditions by Halloween.

More rain & wind for Maritimes

Few leaves remain on trees after strong winds, Irishtown Nature Park, 25 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Another low pressure system moved through the Maritimes on Wednesday bringing a lot of rain to the region especially to western New Brunswick.

Winds were also a factor with this storm but for a shorter period of time even though the peak gust was 81 km/h which was slightly higher than last week.

Here some rainfall totals (mm):

  • Saint John  59
  • Edmundston  59
  • Bathurst  49
  • Fredericton  48
  • Miramichi  37
  • Sydney  30
  • Charlottetown  22
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  21
  • Greater Moncton  19

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Fast and furious storm

A tree topples over in Halifax, NS, 17 Oct 2019 (Nova Scotia Power/Twitter)

A so-called bomb cyclone with wind and rain moved through the Maritimes in just a few hours today.

The intense low pressure system brought winds gusting up to 89 km/h in Saint John which uprooted some trees already weakened by Hurricane Dorian last month.

Greater Moncton recorded a peak gust of 78 km/h along with 20 mm of rain which caused some localized flooding as leaves clogged storm drains.

The winds were even stronger in Nova Scotia with a gust of 101 km/h at Halifax harbour and 106 km/h in Lunenburg which brought trees down knocking out power.

The highest gust was near Cheticamp on Cape Breton Island at 148 km/h.

Rainfall amounts across New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island ranged from 15 to 30 mm with more than double those amounts in Nova Scotia.

Strong fall storm coming

An intense low pressure system is heading to the Maritimes.

Heavy rain will start during the morning hours in Greater Moncton and strong winds will develop by midday.

Environment Canada says rainfall amounts could reach 50 mm while easterly wind gusts of 70 km/h or higher are likely.

Some trees may be at risk of falling after being weakened by Hurricane Dorian last month.

Many leaves will undoubtedly drop which could plug storm drains causing localized flooding.

Manitoba declares state of emergency

A wintry scene in Winnipeg, 12 Oct 2014 (Facebook/Winnipeg)

The Manitoba government declared a state of emergency on Saturday after a powerful storm dumped heavy rain, freezing rain, snow and wind to southern portions of the province this week.

Amid the early winter blast, Manitoba Hydro is trying to restore electricity to thousands of residents after numerous trees and branches – many still covered in leaves – fell onto power lines with winds gusting up to 100 km/h.

The storm was so bad it forced the temporary closure of the Trans Canada Highway from Winnipeg to the Saskatchewan border.

Southern Manitoba got blasted after a Colorado Low moved in from the United States where it brought dramatic temperature drops and heavy snow to the Great Plains states.

The next concern for local emergency measures officials will be flooding as the snow melts given the rising temperatures forecasted over the next few days.

Snowfall totals as of 1pm CDT on Saturday, October 12th:

  • Carberry  74 cm
  • Morden  64 cm
  • Winnipeg  34 cm
  • Dauphin  30 cm
  • Brandon  29 cm

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

September 2019 – Dorian’s fury

Fallen leaves on a trail in Irishtown Nature Park, 23 Sept 2019 (Dearing)

Hurricane Dorian defined September for Southeast New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

Although downgraded before making landfall near Halifax, Dorian was still a very destructive storm.

Powerful winds toppled century-old trees onto power lines, a month’s worth of rain drenched the region in hours and a vicious storm surge tossed boats around like toys.

If it hadn’t been for Dorian, the month would have been quite dry in Greater Moncton.

September also lacked heat with slightly below normal temperatures thanks to chilly nights and cool daytime highs which often struggled to reach 20°C.

SEPTEMBER 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 18.9°C

Average LOW 7.3°C

AVERAGE 13.1°C (about 0.5 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 26.0°C (22 Sept)

Extreme LOW -0.4°C (19 Sept)

RAINFALL 187.5 mm (more than DOUBLE the normal amount)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Storm cleanup continues

Dorian crane (Coastal Elite Wikipedia)

Construction crane collapses during Dorian in south end Halifax, NS, 10 Sept 2019 (Coastal Elite/Wikipedia)

No one expected Dorian to batter Southeast New Brunswick with such intensity.

Hurricane-force winds and a powerful storm surge along the Northumberland Strait wrecked wharves and fishing boats, tossed yachts like toys at a marina, flooded campgrounds and destroyed camper trailers.

For the first time in its history, Parlee Beach has been closed to the public after boardwalks and ramps were damaged posing safety risks for visitors.

The cleanup at Murray Beach may take weeks where dozens of fallen trees closed the campground, kitchen shelters were flattened and the beach itself was heavily eroded.

Torrential rain washed out sections of some roads including in Salisbury where a car plunged into a gaping hole.

Public works crews in Greater Moncton have been clearing away downed trees and branches which were responsible for most power outages.

Five days after Dorian, thousands are still without electricity in Nova Scotia where century old trees toppled onto homes and vehicles.

Many city parks remain closed in Halifax due to debris and efforts begin to dismantle a construction crane which collapsed during the strong winds.

Dorian packs powerful punch

Dorian damage in Halifax’s West End, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Hurricane Dorian has left a path of destruction across the Maritime Provinces despite being downgraded as it crossed the region.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre says Dorian was an intense post-tropical storm as it made landfall at 7:15pm ADT Saturday in Sambro, 25 km southwest of Halifax.

Dorian brought destructive winds, flooding rains and powerful storm surges to much of Nova Scotia, southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

A construction crane collapsed and century old trees toppled onto homes, businesses, vehicles and streets in Halifax.

Public works staff are scrambling to clean up the mess and power crews are trying to restore electricity to the tens of thousands without it.

img_0660

Crews clean up storm damage in Halifax’s west end, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Rainfall totals (mm) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Oxford, NS. 138
  • Halifax (Lower Sackville), NS. 138
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 121
  • Miramichi, NB. 115
  • Kentville, NS. 110
  • Summerside, PEI. 90
  • Saint John, NB. 82
  • Fredericton, NB. 75

Peak wind gusts (km/h) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Beaver Island (eastern shore), NS. 145
  • Yarmouth, NS. 130
  • North Cape, PEI. 122
  • Halifax (city), NS. 120
  • Miscou Island, NB. 106
  • Sydney, NS. 104
  • Saint John, NB. 102
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 100

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)