Heaviest snowfall of 2019

Courtesy NB Highway Cameras, 13 Feb 2019

Lots of rain, freezing rain and ice pellets have been recorded so far this year in Southeast New Brunswick but snow has been somewhat scarce – until today.

A Colorado Low made its way across the continent this week bringing lots of snow to the American Midwest, Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec before arriving in the Maritimes.

Greater Moncton received 26 cm of snow followed by ice pellets and some freezing rain/drizzle along with strong winds which created poor visibility.

Snowfall amounts were fairly consistent across most of Nova Scotia with 22 cm at Greenwood and Halifax Stanfield Airport, 21 cm in Sydney but only 11 cm in Yarmouth.

Environment Canada says cold weather will replace the snow for late week with a brief warmup and rain expected this weekend.

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Coastal B.C. gets winter wallop

Victoria BC

Victoria, BC, 12 Feb 2019 (Royal BC Museum Inner Harbour Webcam)

Wintry weather doesn’t visit the coast of British Columbia very often but it certainly causes disruption when it arrives.

Following back to back snow days, Vancouver has picked up almost 25 cm of snow with higher amounts in the Fraser Valley and Victoria has recorded more than 40 cm.

An Arctic outflow pushing temperatures below freezing combined with low pressure off Vancouver Island is creating snowy rather than more typical rainy conditions.

Traffic and transit services were snarled, schools were cancelled and scattered power outages kept crews busy in the region.

Frigid air follows ice storm

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Aftermath of ice storm in NE Moncton, 08 Feb 2019 (Dearing)

Southern New Brunswick received several hours of freezing rain Friday morning – enough to make highways and other surfaces extremely icy.

Schools were cancelled, many businesses delayed opening until midday, pedestrians were forced to walk like penguins and even salt trucks slid off the road in Nova Scotia.

Ice coated my own steps to the point where I had to slide down them and crawl to my car which was a few metres away.

Greater Moncton only received about 10 mm of rain but the water eventually froze when a cold front followed the ice storm and temperatures plummeted by early Saturday.

Environment Canada is forecasting colder than normal weather but mostly clear skies over the next few days.

Unbelievable cold in the West!

COLD

Thermometer reading near Edmonton where Celsius meets Fahrenheit, 05 Feb 2019 (Twitter)

An Arctic air mass has plunged much of Western Canada into the deep freeze with the coldest weather in nearly a decade.

Frigid temperatures have broken records in Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia with the wind chill making it feel more like -50 in some areas!

Emergency responders had many calls related to frostbite and hypothermia with seniors and young children being especially vulnerable to the cold.

Auto clubs had almost ten times as many requests from drivers for dead car batteries.

These locations were among new minimums set on 05-06 February 2019:

Key Lake, SK
New record of -47.7
Old record of -44.0 set in 2007
Records started in 1976

Meadow Lake, SK
New record of -43.5
Old record of -41.0 set in 1979
Records started in 1959

Saskatoon, SK
New record of -42.5
Old record of -41.7 set in 1907
Records started in 1900

Grande Prairie, AB
New record of -41.5
Old record of -39.4 set in 1933
Records started in 1922

Edmonton International Airport, AB
New record of -41.2
Old record of -37.2 set in 1975
Records started in 1959

Jasper, AB
New record of -39.4
Old record of -35.7 set in 2014
Records started in 1916

Blue River, BC
New record -35.6
Old record -33.0 set in 1989

Lytton, BC
New record -17.4
Old record -17.2 set in 1949

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Spring-like in Eastern Canada

Ahead of a Colorado Low, a mild southerly air flow moved across Eastern Canada resulting in record high temperatures from Southern Ontario to New Brunswick.

The thermometer climbed to a balmy 7.2 C in Greater Moncton but it was shy of the 1962 record of 11.1 C.

Among the locations setting new maximums in New Brunswick on 05 February:

Bouctouche
Tied record of 8.5 set in 2018
Records since 1965

Fredericton
New record of 11.3
Old record of 8.3 set in 1890
Records since 1871

St. Stephen
New record of 12.4
Old record of 9.9 set in 2006
Records since 1898

Woodstock
New record of 10.1
Old record of 7.8 set in 1890
Records since 1886

New record highs set in Ontario included:

St. Catharines
New record 15.1
Old record 13.0 in 1991
Records began in 1902

London
New record 10.0
Old record 9.9 in 1991
Records began in 1941

Kitchener
New record 11.3
Old record 7.8 in 1962
Records began in 1915

Hamilton Airport
New record 12.1
Old record 10.6 in 1991
Records began in 1960

Toronto Pearson Airport
New record 12.7
Old record 11.0 in 1991
Records began in 1970

Peterborough
New record 10.3
Old record 9.0 in 1991
Records began in 1968

Trenton Airport
New record 10.8
Old record 9.2 in 1991
Records began in 1970

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Snowfall totals so far this winter

It should come as no surprise that Greater Moncton is on top of the snowfall totals list in the southern Maritimes although locations in northern New Brunswick have received even heavier amounts.

January 2019 – Wet and wild!

Plumweseep

Flooding at Plumweseep Covered Bridge near Sussex, 25 Jan 2019 (Sussex and Area Events/Facebook)

The beginning of 2019 proved to be wild and crazy in New Brunswick.

Precipitation was well above normal for January as storm after storm brought rain, freezing rain, snow and ice pellets with rapidly fluctuating temperatures.

Ice and snow often blocked storm drains which created flooding during heavy rain and when the thermometer plunged, it all froze.

The average monthly temperature was actually about one degree above normal although it didn’t seem like it given the roller coaster of highs and lows.

JANUARY 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH -2.5°C

Average LOW -13.7°C

AVERAGE -8.1°C (about 0.8 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 10.5°C (24 Jan)

Extreme LOW -21.4°C (14 Jan)

RAINFALL 48.9 mm (above 60 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL 101.3 cm (about 30 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Rain, freezing rain cause flooding

Creek Road near Sussex, NB is washed out by flooding, 25 Jan 2019 (SussexArea/Facebook)

It’s been quite a week for stormy weather in New Brunswick.

The latest system brought heavy rain and a period of freezing rain to the province.

Ice-clogged storm drains caused the water to backup turning streets into rivers in areas such as downtown Moncton.

Municipalities were urging residents to help public works crews by trying to clear drains near their homes.

Mild temperatures contributed to snowmelt and the added rush of water was enough to washout some roads and bridges.

Strong winds along the coast also gusted to more than 100 km/h.

Rainfall amounts (mm):

  • Mechanic Settlement 68
  • Miramichi 61
  • Sussex area 55
  • Kouchibouguac 44
  • Fredericton 34
  • Saint John 25
  • Moncton 13

Bitter cold in Toronto

A bitterly cold day in downtown Toronto, 20 Jan 2019 (Dearing)

Without a doubt, Canada’s largest city can often be cold during the winter.

But during a recent stopover in Toronto, an Arctic air mass pushed into Southern Ontario giving the provincial capital its coldest daytime high ever recorded.

A bitterly cold maximum of -14.2°C was set on 20 January at Pearson Airport.

Two overnight lows also dropped to -22°C this week which although frigid were still a few degrees away from the all-time records.

Until now, Central Canada had practically escaped the winter season apart from a brief blast in late November.

What a mess!

Crestwood Drive under water in north Moncton, 20 Jan 2019 (MacKay/Facebook)

An intense low pressure system proved to be one of the strongest winter storms in the Maritimes so far this season.

Greater Moncton received 12 cm of snow followed by several hours of freezing rain and then almost 30 mm of rain.

The rain led to flooding on many streets after storm drains became clogged with ice and snow and the water had no place to go.

To make matters worse, temperatures plunged well below freezing after the rain and subsequent flooding which led to such icy streets that some donned skates as a more efficient way of getting around.

The wild weather closed many highways for hours including the Trans Canada and Route 1 between River Glade and St. Stephen yesterday.

Northern New Brunswick received the most snow between 30 and 50 cm while the Halifax region of Nova Scotia got the most rain at nearly 60 mm.