Snowstorm sweeps Southeastern U.S.

Southeast USA snowstorm

Man cuts fallen tree blocking a road in South Carolina, 09 Dec 2018 (Reuters)

Several deaths have been reported after a massive snowstorm buried parts of the Southeastern United States with more than 30 cm falling in several major cities to as much as 60 cm in the Appalachian Mountains.

North Carolina and Virginia were especially hard hit by the storm system which slowly moved out into the Atlantic Ocean today.

Highways became hazardous as snowy, icy conditions led to hundreds of collisions, dozens of flights were cancelled and schools and businesses shut down.

About 300,000 customers also lost electricity during the peak as the storm knocked trees onto power lines.

Major snowstorm to batter Northeast U.S.

Jan storm

A major winter storm is threatening to bring life to a standstill in the northeastern United States this weekend from Washington, DC to New York City.

Forecasters say the storm will also affect the southern Appalachian Mountains and brush southern New England.

Winds and the rate of snowfall will increase as the storm progresses from late Friday until early Sunday.

New Brunswick will escape this storm but southern Nova Scotia could pick up some snow.

Nor’easter brings rain, wind and snow to N.B.

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

At the height of the Nor’easter, the rain/snow line across New Brunswick stretched from Charlotte County to Grand Lake to Miramichi.

Greater Moncton received steady rain this weekend with 52 mm reported as of 5pm AST while snow and ice pellets fell in Fredericton and up to 30 cm snow expected for western and northern New Brunswick.

Thousands across the province lost power during the storm due to strong, gusty winds and heavy snow bringing down tree branches.

The same storm also brought early season snow to the Eastern United States mostly in the Appalachian Mountains from South Carolina to Maine.

Storm brings messy mix of precipitation

Moncton pedestrians choose street over sidewalk after messy mix, 14 Feb 2014 (Dearing)

Moncton pedestrians choose street over sidewalk after messy mix, 14 Feb 2014 (Dearing)

Residents of Greater Moncton are cleaning up a messy mix of precipitation today after a nasty winter storm delivered 9 cm of snow, 34 mm of rain and a small amount of freezing rain.

The rain and melting snow led to scattered flooding throughout the city with many pedestrians choosing to walk in the streets instead of on wet, icy sidewalks.

Snowfall amounts were higher in northern New Brunswick with almost 50 cm recorded in Bathurst while rainfall was greatest in southern areas with Saint John reporting 40 mm.

The same system also delivered heavy snow to the American Northeast yesterday with 18 cm at Washington, DC (National Airport), 32 cm at New York City (Central Park) and more than 60 cm falling in the Appalachian Mountains from North Carolina to Vermont.

To make matters even worse, another storm is expected to follow a similar path this weekend with snow and blowing snow creating blizzard conditions.

Wintry storm a-brewin’

wintry

A wintry storm is racing up the Eastern Seaboard with plenty of wind, rain, snow and even a messy mix.

Forecasters say the system will bring mainly wind and rain to Southern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia but precipitation will likely start as snow tomorrow.

A mixture of rain and heavy snow is likely in the Appalachians, eastern Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Valley.

Sandy slams U.S. Northeast

Atlantic City, NJ, USA as Hurricane Sandy approaches, 29 Oct 2012 (AP)

Sandy slammed into the New Jersey coastline last night and hurled a record-breaking four metre surge of seawater at New York City. 

So far, more than 50 deaths are blamed on the storm with many victims killed by falling trees. 

Sandy knocked out power to more than eight million homes with large sections of Manhattan plunged into darkness as water pressed into the island from three sides, flooding rail yards, subway tracks, tunnels and roads. 

The U.S. National Hurricane Center announced at 8 p.m. that Sandy had come ashore near Atlantic City and although technically it was no longer a hurricane, it still brought stinging rain and wind gusts of more than 135 kph.

Winds also gusted to more than 90 kph across Southern Ontario where a woman in Toronto was killed by a falling sign.

As the storm made its way toward land, Sandy converged with a cold weather system that turned into a monstrous hybrid consisting not only of rain and high wind but of snow. 

Parts of the Appalachian Mountains received up to 90 cm of snow. 

Storm damage was projected at $10 to $20 billion, meaning it could prove to be one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.