June 2019 – Mild and wet

Strawberry plant in blossom after rain, NE Moncton, 29 June 2019 (Dearing)

The average monthly temperature for June in Greater Moncton was at least close to normal compared to a damp, cold May.

While daytime highs climbed to 20°C or higher on 20 days, significant heat was scarce and the thermometer didn’t even get close to 30°C.

Rainfall was heavier than normal – a measurable amount was recorded on 21 days – following a trend which began in early spring.

About three-quarters of the precipitation fell during the last ten days of the month.

JUNE 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  21.0°C

Average LOW  8.8°C

AVERAGE  14.9°C (about 0.3 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH  26.0°C (19 June)

Extreme LOW  2.8°C (01 June)

RAINFALL  128.9 mm (almost 30 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

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Spring 2019 in review

Spring 2019
Meteorological spring in Southeast New Brunswick turned out to be colder and much wetter than normal compared to the 30-year average.

While March and April both had above normal temperatures, May was colder by a significant 2.4 degrees which brought down the overall seasonal average.

Rainfall was heavy in April and May and while snowfall was below normal for the three month period, the final snow flurries were spotted as late as 21 May.

“Sprinter” continues

Snowflakes falling in NE Moncton, 14 May 2019 (Dearing)

Sprinter is a portmanteau of spring and winter which aptly describes the recent weather in Southeast New Brunswick.

Already mid-May, Environment Canada indicates Greater Moncton is running about three degrees below normal for the month.

Snow mixed in with rain last night and 0.6 cm was recorded at the airport.

Today’s daytime high was 5.3°C and the forecast shows little change for tomorrow.

The Victoria Day long weekend is expected to bring some sunshine but temperatures will remain below seasonable.

Winter 2018-19 in Review

Winter 18-19
Wintry weather will undoubtedly continue in New Brunswick for the next few weeks but meteorological winter (December, January and February) is officially over.

In Greater Moncton, winter proved to be slightly colder than normal (0.3 degrees cooler) although the extreme low was not as cold as previous years.

Precipitation was about average for the season with slightly above normal rainfall and slightly below normal snowfall.

December 2018 – Cold & dry

Sun glistening on the ice of Shediac Bay, 30 Dec 2018 (Dearing)

December turned out to be another cold month in Greater Moncton continuing a trend which began in October.

An early Arctic air mass kept daytime highs below freezing for a lengthy ten day stretch.

The month did prove to be less stormier than November with below normal rainfall and snowfall.

While Southeast New Brunswick had a snow cover for a few weeks prior to Christmas, it had mostly disappeared by 25 December.

DECEMBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH -1.6°C

Average LOW -10.2°C

AVERAGE -5.9°C (about 1.1 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 12.8°C (22 Dec)

Extreme LOW -16.5°C (09 Dec)

RAINFALL 46.8 mm (slightly BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 34.7 cm (about 40 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Bitter cold hangs on

Irishtown Nature Park reservoir is already frozen, 01 Dec 2018 (Dearing)

An Arctic air mass continues to have its grip over the Maritimes with today marking the sixth day of below freezing temperatures in Greater Moncton.

The early morning lows dropped to -16.1°C yesterday and -16.5°C today.

Brisk northwest winds have also created bitter wind chills into the -20s this weekend giving a risk of frostbite on exposed skin.

The normal high for early December is 0°C and the low is -8°C.

Environment Canada says temperatures may not climb above freezing until Friday making this one of the longest cold snaps in recent memory.

Weather Network unveils winter forecast

wintertemp19
The Weather Network believes the harsh winter conditions this November in New Brunswick are just a preview of the upcoming season.

Temperatures will likely be below normal this season but periods of mild weather can still be expected.

An active storm track along the Atlantic coast will mean many systems delivering above average precipitation including snow, rain and freezing rain.

A developing El Nino should bring a warmer, drier winter for Western Canada and a colder, wetter winter from the Great Lakes to Atlantic Canada.

winterprecip19

Summer to fall in two hours

The skyline of Moncton, NB, 16 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

An abrupt change in temperature thanks to a passing cold front turned summer quickly into fall in Greater Moncton this week.

On Tuesday, Environment Canada reports a temperature of 22°C at 11am which plummeted to 16°C by 1pm and the wind direction changed from the southeast to the northwest.

The long, hot summer in New Brunswick was suddenly over.

The daytime high on Wednesday was 13.6°C which was the coolest day since 25 June.

Forecasters are calling for near or slightly below seasonal temperatures until the end of the month (Normal high 18°C, normal low 7°C).

Juneuary!

Gander26June

Snow falls in Gander, NL (GNL Highway Cameras)

When it snows in June it might as well be January which gives us a new month called Juneuary!

It may now be summer but an icy rain changed to snow in central Newfoundland and the Cape Breton Highlands today.

Gander set a new record with 2 cm of snow and Environment Canada said it has never snowed on 26 June before.

Thanks to a chilly rain, Greater Moncton reached a daytime high of only 11.0 C yesterday which was colder than the average overnight low of 12 C.

Average temperatures in Southeast New Brunswick have been running about three degrees below normal this month.

Summer arrives!

summer solstice

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 7:07am ADT today.

This is the longest day of the year with 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight in Moncton.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will be getting shorter again – by three seconds starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions for the region, the Weather Network is suggesting July and August will have slightly above normal temperatures with high humidity.

Environment Canada believes there is an 80 percent chance of higher than average temperatures and a 40 percent chance of below normal precipitation.