Coolest day since May

Irishtown Nature Park, 05 October 2019 (Dearing)

Chilly temperatures across the Maritimes on Friday made it feel more like early November than early October.

In Greater Moncton, the daytime high for 04 October was only 8.2 C which means it was the coolest day since 22 May when the maximum was only 8.6 C.

Halifax, Charlottetown, Saint John and Fredericton also had highs below 10 C.

The normal high for the first week of October in Southeast New Brunswick is 15 C with an overnight low of 4 C.

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Dorian packs powerful punch

Dorian damage in Halifax’s West End, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Hurricane Dorian has left a path of destruction across the Maritime Provinces despite being downgraded as it crossed the region.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre says Dorian was an intense post-tropical storm as it made landfall at 7:15pm ADT Saturday in Sambro, 25 km southwest of Halifax.

Dorian brought destructive winds, flooding rains and powerful storm surges to much of Nova Scotia, southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

A construction crane collapsed and century old trees toppled onto homes, businesses, vehicles and streets in Halifax.

Public works staff are scrambling to clean up the mess and power crews are trying to restore electricity to the tens of thousands without it.

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Crews clean up storm damage in Halifax’s west end, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Rainfall totals (mm) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Oxford, NS. 138
  • Halifax (Lower Sackville), NS. 138
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 121
  • Miramichi, NB. 115
  • Kentville, NS. 110
  • Summerside, PEI. 90
  • Saint John, NB. 82
  • Fredericton, NB. 75

Peak wind gusts (km/h) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Beaver Island (eastern shore), NS. 145
  • Yarmouth, NS. 130
  • North Cape, PEI. 122
  • Halifax (city), NS. 120
  • Miscou Island, NB. 106
  • Sydney, NS. 104
  • Saint John, NB. 102
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 100

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Heavy rain hits Maritimes

Ominous sky over Jones Lake, Moncton, 04 June 2019 (Dearing)

A slow moving low pressure system crossed the Maritime Provinces on Friday bringing heavy rain to the region.

Environment Canada had posted rainfall warnings for many areas with 40 to 60 mm in southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and up to 100 mm in northern Nova Scotia.

Here are some rainfall totals (in mm):

  • Parrsboro, NS  123
  • Greenwood, NS  81
  • Kejumkujik NP, NS  72
  • Saint John, NB  61
  • Charlottetown, PEI  54
  • Summerside, PEI  53
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB  52
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, NS  41
  • Fredericton, NB  30
  • Yarmouth, NS  22

Second heaviest snowfall of the season

Cat enters snowbound backyard in NW Moncton, 04 March 2019 (T. Clow)

A low pressure system approached the Maritimes from the northeastern United States late Sunday night.

Snow began in New Brunswick early Monday and intensified throughout the day before tapering off to freezing drizzle by evening.

About 24 cm fell in Greater Moncton which was the second heaviest snowfall of the season after the storm on 13 February.

The system also brought snow to western and central Newfoundland later on Monday with freezing rain to the Avalon Peninsula.

Snowfall amounts (cm) as of 1AM Tuesday from Environment Canada:

  • Sydney: 26
  • Saint John Airport: 26
  • Greater Moncton Airport: 24
  • Deer Lake: 23
  • Fredericton: 21
  • Miramichi: 21
  • Charlottetown: 19
  • Greenwood: 19
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport: 17
  • Bathurst: 14
  • Gander: 14
  • Yarmouth: 12

Bitter cold ahead of more snow

Temperatures sunk early Monday across the Maritimes with some New Brunswick locations shattering records by almost five degrees dating back to the 1880’s.

The bitter cold precedes another storm system which could bring up to 25 cm of snow to southern New Brunswick, most of Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia.

While it plunged to -14.7°C in Greater Moncton, the 1936 record still stands at -16.7°C.

Here are some of the new record lows set in the region on 19 November:

  • Bathurst, NB -22.5°C
  • Woodstock, NB -21.4°C
  • Miramichi, NB -20.2°C
  • Kouchibouguac, NB -20.0°C
  • Summerside, PE -15.7°C
  • Charlottetown, PE -15.2°C

Early blast of winter

Main Street East webcam, 17 Nov 2018 (City of Moncton)

Southeast New Brunswick received about 20 cm of snow from a Nor’easter giving the region its first taste of winter.

Rain or ice pellets did not mix in as forecast for Greater Moncton but the snow was wet and heavy.

Higher amounts of snow fell further north and lesser amounts along the Fundy coast, Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia where more rain fell.

Snowfall totals (in cm):

  • Kouchibouguac 28
  • Bouctouche 22
  • Greater Moncton 20
  • Miramichi 14
  • Fredericton 13
  • Charlottetown 9
  • Saint John 8
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)
  • Risk of frost!

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    Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)

    New Brunswick and most of Nova Scotia are under a frost advisory for tonight and tomorrow night.

    Cold air, light winds and few clouds will allow temperatures to fall near the freezing point and patchy frost is expected.

    The average last frost date in spring for Greater Moncton is 23 May.

    Farmers are already suffering from tremendous losses in the region with crops such as grapes, strawberries, blueberries and apples being hit by a recent hard frost with a low of -4 C in some areas.

    June has gotten off to cold start with snow flurries reported in Charlottetown this week and accumulating snow in the highlands of Cape Breton and St. John’s, Newfoundland.

    Record lows in Maritimes

    Temp0degrees
    We are now several weeks into the growing season and temperatures are dropping to dangerously cold lows.

    Farmers are concerned about damage to crops after a cool air mass and clear skies led to a frigid low of -4 C in parts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia overnight.

    Greater Moncton dropped to -3.2 C early today which broke the old record of -2.2 C from 1903 and records go back to 1881.

    The following new record lows were set on 04 June:

    • Kouchibouguac National Park, NB -3.8 C (records since 1924)
    • Grand Manan, NB -2.2 C (records since 1883)
    • Port Hawkesbury, NS -2.6 C (records since 1875)
    • Ingonish, NS -2.2 C (records since 1950)
    • Summerside, PEI -1.9 C (records since 1898)
    • Charlottetown, PEI -1.0 C (records since 1872)

    Nor’easter number four!

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    Moncton’s west end after the latest Nor’easter, 23 March 2018 (Dearing)

    It seems a bit strange the largest single snowfall this winter in Greater Moncton actually occurred on the second full day of spring.

    Environment Canada says Southeast New Brunswick hit the snow jackpot from the fourth Nor’easter this month with more than 30 cm recorded.

    A storm on 30 January was the previous snowfall event winner with almost 25 cm.

    Strong winds were also a factor in this storm gusting at times to 82 km/h.

    Here are some other snowfall totals:

    • Kentville, NS  24 cm
    • Alma, NB  20 cm
    • Yarmouth, NS  18 cm
    • Sussex, NB  17 cm
    • Charlottetown, PEI  12 cm
    • Halifax Stanfield Airport, NS  11 cm
    • Bathurst, NB  8 cm
    • Saint John, NB  6 cm

    Strike number 3!

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    Wet, heavy snow in NE Moncton, 14 March 2018 (Dearing)

    The third Nor’easter in a week to strike Southeast New Brunswick packed less punch than the other two despite predictions it would be the strongest.

    Temperatures remained near freezing in Greater Moncton during the snowfall which made it extremely heavy and wet and strong winds gusted to 85 km/h.

    The western and northeastern parts of the province were hardest hit from this storm.

    Snowfall totals as of 9pm ADT, 14 March:

    • Miramichi  46 cm
    • Bathurst  40 cm
    • Fredericton  38 cm
    • Saint John  27 cm
    • Greater Moncton  16 cm
    • Halifax Stanfield Airport  12 cm
    • Charlottetown  5 cm

    Peak wind gusts:

    • Grand Etang  146 km/h
    • Lunenburg  104 km/h
    • Sydney  85 km/h
    • Halifax Stanfield  83 km/h