Brief heat wave ends

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 04 July 2019 (Dearing)

In less than two hours, the temperature in Greater Moncton dropped from 31.1°C to 24.0°C late this afternoon – a difference of seven degrees.

A cold front moved through New Brunswick with thunderstorms marking an abrupt end to the summer’s first brief heat wave.

Environment Canada even issued a tornado warning for the Grand Lake area after a possible twister developed south of Boiestown.

The warning was lifted after 30 minutes and no damage or injuries were reported.

Record highs have been broken in a number of communities across the Maritimes.

Friday, 05 July:

  • Kouchibouguac NP, new record 31.1°C, old record 33.9°C from 1939
  • Grand Manan, new record 31.7°C, old record 30.0°C from 1999
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, 32.7°C, old record 31.4°C from 2013

Greater Moncton was within a hair of breaking a record Saturday and Sunday it was the warmest on that date since 2013.

  • 05 July, high 34.0°C, record 34.2°C from 2018
  • 06 July, high 31.4°C, record 35.0°C from 1911

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

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Here comes the heat!

The view from Economy Point, NS, 03 July 2019 (Dearing)

After a cool and wet start to summer, a blast of heat is heading to the Maritime Provinces over the next few days.

Environment Canada has issued heat warnings for most of New Brunswick – excluding the Fundy coast – and western Nova Scotia while other areas under a special weather statement.

A warm, humid air mass is moving into the region today raising daytime temperatures to 30°C or more.

Humidex values near 40 are expected and overnight lows may not fall below 18°C providing little relief from the heat.

Near normal values will return late Saturday as a cold front arrives.

Heat warnings are also in place for parts of Ontario and Quebec where it climbed into the low 30s yesterday.

Warmest since early November!

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The last day of March proved to be the warmest day in Greater Moncton since 03 November when the thermometer hit 17.1 C.

The daytime high reached a balmy 16.8 C and the New Brunswick hot spot was 19 C in Sussex which brought residents outdoors to walk, run, hike and play.

The maximum was actually close to the record for the date which was 17.5 C from 2006.

But a passing cold front will drop the temperature considerably overnight as rain changes to snow and Monday’s high struggles to reach slightly above freezing.

Frigid air follows ice storm

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Aftermath of ice storm in NE Moncton, 08 Feb 2019 (Dearing)

Southern New Brunswick received several hours of freezing rain Friday morning – enough to make highways and other surfaces extremely icy.

Schools were cancelled, many businesses delayed opening until midday, pedestrians were forced to walk like penguins and even salt trucks slid off the road in Nova Scotia.

Ice coated my own steps to the point where I had to slide down them and crawl to my car which was a few metres away.

Greater Moncton only received about 10 mm of rain but the water eventually froze when a cold front followed the ice storm and temperatures plummeted by early Saturday.

Winds were also strong behind the system gusting at times up to 90 km/h.

Environment Canada is forecasting colder than normal weather but mostly clear skies over the next few days.

Strong winds across Atlantic Canada

A fast-moving cold front passed through the Maritimes today on its way to Newfoundland.

Powerful winds developed as a result which knocked out electricity to tens of thousands of customers across New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

The Greater Moncton International Airport recorded a gust of almost 90 km/h late this morning with Cape Breton Island reporting winds of more than 100 km/h.

Many locations across Newfoundland had hurricane-force gusts including Bonavista at 126 km/h, Wreckhouse at 107 km/h and St. John’s at 104 km/h.

The cold front also affected Southern Quebec yesterday with gusts of more than 80 km/h in Montreal and Quebec City.

September 2018 – Warm and wet

Black-eyed Susans growing in Upper Hammonds Plains, NS, 21 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

Warm, summer weather picked up in September where it left off in August in Southeast New Brunswick.

But the passage of a cold front marked a drastic temperature drop on the 18th and suddenly it felt like fall in Greater Moncton.

The thermometer continued to plunge and sank to -1.9°C on the 25th with light, scattered frost although most vegetation was spared severe damage.

Precipitation was actually above normal although heavy amounts fell in a handful of rainfalls.

SEPTEMBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 20.9°C

Average LOW 7.9°C

AVERAGE 14.4°C (about 0.8 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 28.9°C (06 Sept)

Extreme LOW -1.9°C (25 Sept)

RAINFALL 100.5 mm (about 10 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Summer to fall in two hours

The skyline of Moncton, NB, 16 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

An abrupt change in temperature thanks to a passing cold front turned summer quickly into fall in Greater Moncton this week.

On Tuesday, Environment Canada reports a temperature of 22°C at 11am which plummeted to 16°C by 1pm and the wind direction changed from the southeast to the northwest.

The long, hot summer in New Brunswick was suddenly over.

The daytime high on Wednesday was 13.6°C which was the coolest day since 25 June.

Forecasters are calling for near or slightly below seasonal temperatures until the end of the month (Normal high 18°C, normal low 7°C).

Snow in South Africa

Giraffe in the snow, Sneeuberg, Eastern Cape, South Africa, 08 Sept 2018 (Facebook)

An intense cold front has gripped South Africa bringing snowfall to southwestern parts of the country.

Temperatures fell below freezing in the Cape Provinces.

More than 10 cm snow forced the closure of roads through some mountain passes in Eastern Cape when trucks got stranded.

Meantime, as much as 100 mm rain drenched the southern coast.

Keep in mind it is still winter in the Southern Hemisphere with spring officially arriving on 23 September.

Heat wave ends

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Thundershower as cold front sweeps Greater Moncton, 06 July 2018 (91.9 The Bend)

The passing of a cold front led to showers and thundershowers in Southeast New Brunswick today marking the end of hot, humid weather.

Environment Canada has noted Greater Moncton endured an official heat wave by definition with three straight days of at least 32°C.

The trio of record highs this week:

JULY 3rd : 31.6 C (new), 31.0 C (old record 1984)

JULY 4th : 33.4 C (new), 31.6 C (old record 2013)

JULY 5th : 34.2 C (new), 32.7 C (old record 2013)

The hotspot in New Brunswick on 05 July was a scorching 36.0 C at Miramichi and not far behind was 35.5 C at Kouchibouguac National Park.

As the heat subsides in Eastern Canada, hot weather is building in Western Canada with an impressive record high today of 39.3 C at Val Marie, Saskatchewan.

Heat warning!

Bouctouche Dunes coastline, NB, 01 July 2018 (Dearing)

Record highs could be broken in Greater Moncton over the next couple of days if forecast highs in the low to mid 30s C are reached on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Environment Canada has issued a rare heat warning for New Brunswick, mainland Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island with cooler conditions along the coast.

A warm, humid airmass is expected to push humidex values about 40 during the day and barely falling below 18 C at night – dangerous levels for those susceptible to heat.

Forecasters believe warm, humid weather will persist until later this week when a cold front brings temperatures closer to normal for the weekend.