Nor’easter packs bigger punch than expected

Noreaster30Jan18
The track of the latest Nor’easter hugged the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia which ultimately led to more snow in Southeast New Brunswick than forecasters first thought.

Environment Canada originally predicted 10 cm but more than double fell in Greater Moncton which ended up with the highest snow total in the Maritimes.

This was a classic Nor’easter with strong winds reaching a peak gust of 78 km/h creating blowing and drifting snow in open areas.

Here are some regional totals as of 8am ADT on 31 January:

  • Greater Moncton Airport:  25 cm
  • Halifax International Airport: 23 cm
  • Greenwood: 20
  • Sydney:  20
  • Halifax (downtown): 19
  • Charlottetown:  19
  • Bathurst:  18
  • CFB Gagetown:  14
  • Yarmouth:  13
  • Saint John Airport:  11
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Another winter storm wallops N.B.

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The snowbanks keep getting higher in NW Moncton, 16 Feb 2017 (Facebook)

An intense low pressure system tracked across the Maritimes today bringing heavy snow along with strong northerly winds creating blowing and drifting snow.

Environment Canada says this was the fourth storm system to impact Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick over the last two weeks.

Visibility was often very poor and the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization restricted travel to snow plows and emergency vehicles on many major highways today.

Snowfall totals:

Greater Moncton: 35 cm

Saint John: 25 cm

Fredericton: 20 cm

Charlottetown: 15 cm

Greenwood, NS: 40 cm

Halifax Stanfield Airport: 15 cm

Blizzard totals in Maritimes

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Schools were shut down for a second day in Southeast New Brunswick and few businesses chose to open after a major blizzard dumped more than 50 cm of snow on Greater Moncton by late today.

Strong winds gusting to 117 km/h created blowing and drifting snow which hampered all modes of transportation.

In the American Northeast, the blizzard packed the biggest punch in Boston with more than 60 cm of snow while about 30 cm fell in New York City prompting a rare shutdown of the public transit system and apologies from some weather forecasters who predicted even more would fall.

Moncton digs out after wintry wallop

Donald Avenue Moncton, 12 Feb 2012 (Dearing photo)

Precipitation began early yesterday in Greater Moncton as rain (about 3 mm fell) before cold air rushed in, the temperature fell below freezing and the rain changed to ice briefly and then to snow (about 29 cm fell).

Winds were also a factor with gusts up to 60 km/h reported at the Greater Moncton Airport causing blowing and drifting snow.

Snow and ice made roads impassable in some areas with Nova Scotia’s Cobequid Pass closed for hours early Sunday.

Prince Edward Island was hardest hit with ice bringing down power lines and more than 40 cm of snow in Charlottetown.

Closer to the Atlantic coast, precipitation fell mostly as rain (with up to 50 mm reported in Halifax) which later turned to freezing rain and ice pellets making for icy road conditions.