Heat wave abruptly ends in N.B.

The temperature climbed to 30 C for three days in a row in Greater Moncton which is an unofficial heat wave since 32 C is the maximum by definition.

Those warm daytime highs, 30.4 C (19 July), 30.4 C (20 July) and 30.0 C (21 July), still haven’t eclipsed the season-to-date maximum of 30.8 C recorded on 11 June.

A cold front moved west to east through New Brunswick yesterday triggering scattered thunderstorms with heavy rain, gusty winds and even hail.

The heat and humidity have been replaced by a cooler, drier air mass with highs in the low 20’s C which is slightly below normal for late July.

Decent first half of July

An ominous afternoon sky over Greater Moncton, 17 July 2017 (Dearing)


For whatever reason, summer seems to go by faster than the other seasons and here we are already at the midway point of July. 

After 16 days, Greater Moncton has been having a decent month with an average temperature of 19.3 C which is 0.5 degrees above normal. 

Daytime highs have been warm but not hot with a peak of 29.4 C on 16 July while overnight lows have been mild except for a chilly low of 8.9 C on  05 July. 

The only concern is a lack of rainfall. 

The tally is 19.8 mm so far – less than a quarter of the monthly total – but keep in mind we are entering what is traditionally the driest period of the year in Southeast New Brunswick. 

(Stats courtesy Environment Canada)

Thousands evacuated in B.C. wildfires 

Wildfire north of Cache Creek, BC, 07 July 2017 (BC Transportation/Twitter)


A state of emergency is in place across British Columbia which gives government special authority over more than 230 wildfires. 

B.C. wildfire officials say weeks of hot, dry weather combined with strong winds and dry lightning have led to almost 16,000 hectares being burned so far. 

More than 7,000 residents in the Interior and Cariboo regions have been evacuated from communities like Cache Creek, Princeton, Ashcroft and 100 Mile House to be housed in Kamloops. 

Temperatures remain hot in these areas this weekend soaring above 30 C. 

Snow falls in Sahara Desert

saharasnow

Snow covers red sand dunes, Ain Sefra, Algeria, 19 Dec 2016 (Karim Bouchetata/Geoff Robinson)

One of the hottest places on Earth has recorded a light snowfall for the first time in 37 years – since February 1979.

In the normally dry, hot Sahara desert, snow fell in the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria on 19 December.

The snow stayed for almost a day before it melted away.

A “Gateway to the Desert,” Ain Sefra is 1,078 metres above sea level and is surrounded by the Atlas Mountains.

November 2016 – Mild and dry

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Remembrance Day service at Sunny Brae cenotaph, Moncton, 11 Nov 2016 (Twitter)

The first two-thirds of November proved to be mostly mild and dry in Greater Moncton although small amounts of rain did fall on most days.

The last ten days of the month took a decidedly colder turn and while overnight lows weren’t very cold, daytime highs struggled in the low single digits.

A blast of winter came at the very end with 26 cm of heavy, wet snow which brought up precipitation amounts but the total was still almost 40 percent below normal.

NOVEMBER 2016 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton International Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  7.2 C

Average LOW  0.5 C

AVERAGE  3.8 C (about 1.9 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  13.7 C (14 November)

Extreme LOW  -4.6 C (29 November)

RAINFALL  35.8 mm (about 60 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL  28.1 cm (about 30 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Autumn officially arrives

Spring equinox

Courtesy Accuweather.com

Autumn arrived in New Brunswick at 11:21 AM (Atlantic Time) today.

The autumnal equinox occurs when the sun is directly overhead at the equator and days and nights are about equal in length.

The sun continues to move south of the equator and the amount of daylight decreases until the winter solstice (shortest day of the year) on 21 December.

The leaves are just starting to change colour in Greater Moncton.

Given the dry summer in much of the Maritimes, experts say the fall colours may not be as vibrant and the leaves could drop off earlier than usual.

SW Nova Scotia hit by drought

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Dry pond, Arcadia, Yarmouth Co., NS, 14 Sept 2016 (Comeau/Yarmouth Vanguard)

While it has been dry this summer in parts of New Brunswick, no where has it been drier in the Maritimes than in southwest Nova Scotia.

Meteorologists say while the jet stream normally flows through the middle of the region providing adequate amounts of rain, it was pushed farther north this summer due to the Bermuda High which has been northwest of its usual position.

As a result, rainfall in northern New Brunswick has been above average while southwest Nova Scotia has only received 32 percent of its normal summer precipitation.

For example, Yarmouth had 87 mm of rain during June, July and August which is well below the average of 268 mm.

Emergency management officials say at least 1,000 households have run out of water and bottled water donations from major retailers are being shipped to affected communities.

August 2016 – Warm and humid

Irishtown

Irishtown Park Reservoir, 28 Aug 2016 (Dearing)

A warm, dry trend which began in July continued in August in Southeast New Brunswick.

Although the temperature only climbed above 30 C once, there were 20 days with highs between 25 and 30 C often with high humidity and the overall monthly average was almost one degree above normal.

Rainfall was actually slightly above normal although a single rain event on 17 August delivered 35.4 mm which was more than one third the monthly total.

AUGUST 2016 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton International Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 25.0 C

Average LOW 13.2 C

AVERAGE 19.1 C (about 0.9 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 30.2 C (10 August)

Extreme LOW 8.9 (28 August)

RAINFALL 95.6 mm (about 15 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Much needed rain arrives in Maritimes

RainAug17

Notable rainfall amounts, 17 Aug 2016 (CTV/Twitter)

Greater Moncton recorded its highest rainfall event of the summer yesterday when more than 35 mm fell during what has been a very dry season.

Much of southern New Brunswick received between 20 and 60 mm of rain while unofficial reports in central Nova Scotia indicated as much as 100 mm fell.

The moisture lifted a burn ban across the region and helped temper forest fires in southwestern Nova Scotia.

The precipitation has also been welcomed by many farmers who have been struggling this summer.

Cooler than normal in N.B.

Cloud

Evening sky in Moncton, 03 July 2016 (Dearing)

Greater Moncton typically reaches a daytime high of 25 C in early July but while it was 28 C yesterday, it was only 19 C today and perhaps slightly cooler tomorrow.

The below normal conditions – coming after several weeks of warm weather – are due to a chilly north wind and two low pressure systems merging over Atlantic Canada.

On a positive note, some needed rain is on the way after a recent dry spell in Southeastern New Brunswick.