Hello summer!

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 12:54 pm ADT and it was certainly welcome after a relentlessly cold spring.

Greater Moncton enjoyed 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight today but unfortunately the sun didn’t make an appearance due to lots of clouds and heavy rain.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will get shorter – ever so slowly starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions, The Weather Network is suggesting warmer than normal temperatures in July and into August with near normal precipitation.

Environment Canada is calling for near normal temperatures and near to slightly above normal precipitation.

Hello Spring!

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Magnolia tree in bloom, downtown Moncton, spring 2018 (Dearing)

The spring equinox officially arrived at 6:58pm ADT in the Northern Hemisphere which marks the moment when the Sun is directly above the equator as it moves northward.

The length of days are now roughly equal to the length of nights and the amount of daylight will continue to increase until the first day of summer on June 21st.

To mark the end of astronomical winter, here are a few highlights across Canada from the last three months:

  • Record highs were set in Atlantic Canada just before Christmas with 12.8°C in Greater Moncton on 22 December.
  • Edmonton broke numerous cold records during February with readings as low as -41.2°C and all but four days were in the minus 20’s and 30’s.
  • Snowfall records fell in coastal British Columbia from 10-12 February with 69 cm in Nanaimo and 52 cm in Victoria – more than what is normally received in an entire winter season!

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Summer arrives!

summer solstice

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 7:07am ADT today.

This is the longest day of the year with 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight in Moncton.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will be getting shorter again – by three seconds starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions for the region, the Weather Network is suggesting July and August will have slightly above normal temperatures with high humidity.

Environment Canada believes there is an 80 percent chance of higher than average temperatures and a 40 percent chance of below normal precipitation.

Winter solstice marks shortest day

SolsticeDaylight

Map courtesy Brian Brettschneider (Twitter)

Greater Moncton experienced its shortest day of the year with 8 hours and 37 minutes of daylight.

The winter solstice occurred at 12:28pm in New Brunswick marking the point where the direct rays of the sun begin moving north from the Tropic of Capricorn to the Equator.

As the above map shows, most of the Maritimes, Southern Quebec and Southern Ontario have between 8.5 and 9 hours of daylight on this date.

North of the Arctic Circle, the sun does not rise at all today.

Spring arrives!

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Ice melting in Irishtown Reservoir, Moncton, 18 Mar 2017 (Dearing)

After a stormy, rollercoaster winter in Southeast New Brunswick, spring will be especially welcomed today at 7:28am ADT.

The vernal or spring equinox is when the sun’s direct rays move north of the equator from the southern to the northern hemisphere.

At this time, the length of day and night are about equal and days will continue to lengthen until the summer solstice in June.

But winter is not over yet as Environment Canada says a low pressure system will bring snow to Nova Scotia and the possibility of freezing rain for Greater Moncton.

Autumn officially arrives

Spring equinox

Courtesy Accuweather.com

Autumn arrived in New Brunswick at 11:21 AM (Atlantic Time) today.

The autumnal equinox occurs when the sun is directly overhead at the equator and days and nights are about equal in length.

The sun continues to move south of the equator and the amount of daylight decreases until the winter solstice (shortest day of the year) on 21 December.

The leaves are just starting to change colour in Greater Moncton.

Given the dry summer in much of the Maritimes, experts say the fall colours may not be as vibrant and the leaves could drop off earlier than usual.

Spring arrives but winter not over yet

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Moncton west end at Jones Lake, 17 March 2016 (Dearing)

The spring or vernal equinox officially arrived in New Brunswick at 1:30am ADT and occurs when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night are nearly equal.

The sun will continue moving northward, lengthening the days, until late June when the summer solstice arrives and reverses the trend.

But just because spring is officially here doesn’t mean winter is over with a winter storm warning issued by Environment Canada.

A Nor’easter could dump 20-30 cm of snow on Greater Moncton tomorrow before the storm moves out Monday night.

First Day of Autumn

september-equinox
Autumn officially arrived in New Brunswick at 5:22 am (ADT).

The autumnal equinox occurs when the sun shines directly on the equator and the length of day and night is nearly equal.

Daylight will continue to diminish quickly as the fall season progresses which means less sun for warmth.

Incidentally, frost arrived in some parts of the province this week with a risk in Greater Moncton by early Friday morning.

Winter officially arrives

solsticeAlthough it has felt like winter at times in New Brunswick since mid-November, the solstice officially arrived at 7:03 pm AT this evening.

The solstice is when the sun gets as low as it can at midday — that’s why it “stands still”; it has dipped as low as it can go and has stopped its decline.

It’s the shortest day and longest night of the year.

If you go out tomorrow the sun will be a wee bit higher at midday and the day will be a tad longer.

First day of autumn

Autumn leaves in Albert County (taken October 2007)

Autumn leaves in Albert County (taken October 2007)

The autumnal equinox actually arrived in New Brunswick at 11:29-pm Atlantic time last night so this is the first full day of fall.

The word equinox comes from the Latin words for “equal night.”

The Sun begins crossing the celestial equator heading southward.

From here on out, the temperatures begin to drop and the days start to get shorter than the nights.