Rain turns to snow!

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Snow covering grassy areas in NE Moncton, 23 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

After an intense late fall storm moved through the Maritimes, strong winds and colder air followed changing rain to snow.

Wind gusts were clocked as high as 139 km/h on the Confederation Bridge prompting a closure this morning.

Rainfall amounts were heavy in many areas including Greater Moncton at 43 mm, Saint John at 56 mm and Halifax Stanfield Airport recorded 33 mm.

Southeast New Brunswick also had several centimetres of snow earlier today which mainly stuck to grassy areas.

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Winter hits northern NB

Bathurst snow

NB Route 8 between Bathurst and Allardville, 17 Nov 2017 (Facebook/RCMP)

A fall storm brought heavy rain to Southern New Brunswick but rain changed to snow in northern New Brunswick today giving the region its first taste of winter this season.

RCMP were asking drivers to slow down and pay attention to the conditions as snow accumulated on highways.

Up to 10 cm of snow fell in some parts of the north with Bathurst reporting about 4 cm.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 8 C in the morning and fell to 3 C by mid-afternoon when snow mixed in with rain.

Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

Rain is welcome relief

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Autumn 2017 – Abnormally dry (YELLOW), Moderate drought (TAN), courtesy Agriculture Canada


Central New Brunswick is experiencing a moderate drought while much of the rest of the province is abnormally dry except for the Acadian Peninsula according to Agriculture Canada.

Forecasters say two weather systems could bring as much as 100 mm of rain on Thursday and Friday which is welcome relief for a prolonged dry period which began in early summer.

Environment Canada has issued rainfall warnings for western and southern New Brunswick but the Southeast is expecting less than 40 mm.

Meantime, more record highs were broken across the Maritimes today as southerly air continued to push temperatures well into the 20’s C.

Fall foliage past peak

Maple tree past peak in Moncton, 22 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

The fall foliage in Southeast New Brunswick is now past peak and the leaves are starting to tumble to the ground.

Typically a strong wind and/or rain event will bring down most remaining leaves from the trees with maples the first to shed and oaks among the last.

Forestry experts say unseasonably warm weather across the Maritimes this autumn have muted some fall colours.

Rich, vivid displays are most common when days are sunny but cool and nights are cold.

Fall colours reach peak

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Centennial Park (top) and Irishtown Nature Park (bottom), Moncton, 09 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

Mother Nature is putting on a great show this autumn with brilliant hues of red, yellow and orange throughout Southeast New Brunswick. 

The tourism department says fall colours have reached their peak across northern New Brunswick and are near peak in the rest of the province. 

On Thanksgiving Monday, I had a chance to capture images of the amazing fall foliage in Greater Moncton at Centennial Park and Irishtown Nature Park. 

Harvest Moon

The almost Full Harvest Moon over Moncton, NB, 04 Oct 2017

Under a mostly cloudy sky, it was difficult to capture the Full Harvest Moon in most of Southeast New Brunswick but I did manage to get a shot last night.

The Harvest Moon derives its name from when farmers used the moon’s bright light to help them gather crops for winter.

The Harvest Moon is the full moon nearest to the autumnal equinox which occurred on 22 September.

September 2017 – Summer continues

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Maple leaves changing colour in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 04 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

September turned out to be a continuation of summer in Southeast New Brunswick right up until month end.

Daytime highs in Greater Moncton climbed above 25 C on ten days and a monthly maximum of 31.1 C turned out to be the warmest of 2017 set in early fall (26 Sept).

Although hurricanes never directly affected the province, meteorologists say much of the warmth last month came from tropical air pushed northward from these storms.

Rainfall was exactly normal but almost all of the precipitation fell during a single rain event spread over two days (6-7 Sept).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  22.3 C

Average LOW  9.4 C

AVERAGE  15.8 C (about 2.2 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  31.1 C (26 Sept, warmest high of 2017)

Extreme LOW  0.6 C (30 Sept)

RAINFALL  93.5 mm (Exactly NORMAL)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Warmest high of 2017

Sunflowers flourishing during heat wave, Salisbury, NB, 24 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

Having a heat wave in late September is unusual for Southeast New Brunswick but even more so is that the highest temperature of 2017 has occurred in early autumn.

The thermometer soared to 31.1 C yesterday (26 September) at the Greater Moncton International Airport which breaks the previous maximum of 29.6 C from 2007 and records date back to 1881.

The previous high for the year had been 30.6 C recorded on 04 August.

At least 10 other New Brunswick communities set new record highs yesterday including Fredericton at 32.8 C, Woodstock at 32.3 C and Bouctouche at 31.8 C.

Environment Canada says temperatures will return to more seasonable values by the weekend with highs between 16 and 18 C.

Early fall heat

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 23 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

This may have been the first weekend of autumn in Southeast New Brunswick but it felt more like the first weekend of summer instead.

Greater Moncton climbed to 27.7 C yesterday (23 September) while today (24 September) it hit 27.9 C and the normal high for late September is 17 C.

High pressure and a northerly jet stream has pushed heat across Eastern Canada with highs in the low 30s C in many parts of Ontario and Southern Quebec.

A heat warning was in place as Toronto Pearson Airport reached a record-breaking 33.1 C yesterday and 33.6 C today.