First snow flurries of fall!

Snow squall in west end Moncton, 18 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Low clouds and cold gusty winds across the warm Gulf of St. Lawrence and Bay of Fundy produced the first snow flurries of the season throughout the Maritimes today.

Greater Moncton actually had occasional snow squalls throughout the afternoon but there was no accumulation.

Some areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia did record slight amounts on the ground.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement with up to 10 cm of snow possible for the Cape Breton Highlands.

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Fall colours reach peak

Fall foliage along St George Boulevard, Moncton, 13 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

The brilliant fall foliage hues of red, orange and gold have reached their peak in Southeast New Brunswick.

Leaves have already begun falling to the ground and the season is already past peak across the northern part of the province.

Experts say the colours have peaked about a week later than usual thanks to a hot, dry summer which caused stress for leaves.

The drought was relatively short-lived with a plentiful amount of rain recorded so far this autumn.

Leslie responsible for rain

Hurricane Leslie, 04 Oct 2018 (U.S. National Hurricane Centre)

Hurricane Leslie is churning well south of the Maritimes and is not forecast to impact the region directly but the storm is indirectly responsible for heavy rain.

The sheer size of the storm – Leslie is more than 1,000 km wide – caused a low pressure system to stall bringing lots of rain to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Here are some totals from the rain event:

  • Greater Moncton. 32.6 mm
  • Saint John. 46.7 mm
  • Charlottetown. 47.2 mm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport. 24.7 mm
  • Yarmouth. 43.2 mm
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)
  • September 2018 – Warm and wet

    Black-eyed Susans growing in Upper Hammonds Plains, NS, 21 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

    Warm, summer weather picked up in September where it left off in August in Southeast New Brunswick.

    But the passage of a cold front marked a drastic temperature drop on the 18th and suddenly it felt like fall in Greater Moncton.

    The thermometer continued to plunge and sank to -1.9°C on the 25th with light, scattered frost although most vegetation was spared severe damage.

    Precipitation was actually above normal although heavy amounts fell in a handful of rainfalls.

    SEPTEMBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

    Average HIGH 20.9°C

    Average LOW 7.9°C

    AVERAGE 14.4°C (about 0.8 degrees ABOVE normal)

    Extreme HIGH 28.9°C (06 Sept)

    Extreme LOW -1.9°C (25 Sept)

    RAINFALL 100.5 mm (about 10 percent ABOVE normal)

    (Data courtesy Environment Canada)

    Summer departs with gusty winds

    Hints of fall colours in west end Moncton, 20 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

    The same storm system which brought severe weather to Ontario and Quebec – including tornadoes – crossed through New Brunswick overnight.

    Strong low pressure caused gusty winds up to 72 km/h at the Greater Moncton International Airport which turned out to be the windiest day since 02 June.

    A wind gust of 85 km/h was reported in Charlo.

    NB Power said almost 10,000 customers lost power at the peak of the storm thanks to trees and branches falling on utility lines.

    Incidentally, fall officially arrives later tonight with the autumnal equinox at 10:54 pm ADT.

    Summer to fall in two hours

    The skyline of Moncton, NB, 16 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

    An abrupt change in temperature thanks to a passing cold front turned summer quickly into fall in Greater Moncton this week.

    On Tuesday, Environment Canada reports a temperature of 22°C at 11am which plummeted to 16°C by 1pm and the wind direction changed from the southeast to the northwest.

    The long, hot summer in New Brunswick was suddenly over.

    The daytime high on Wednesday was 13.6°C which was the coolest day since 25 June.

    Forecasters are calling for near or slightly below seasonal temperatures until the end of the month (Normal high 18°C, normal low 7°C).

    Rain turns to snow!

    img_9812

    Snow covering grassy areas in NE Moncton, 23 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

    After an intense late fall storm moved through the Maritimes, strong winds and colder air followed changing rain to snow.

    Wind gusts were clocked as high as 139 km/h on the Confederation Bridge prompting a closure this morning.

    Rainfall amounts were heavy in many areas including Greater Moncton at 43 mm, Saint John at 56 mm and Halifax Stanfield Airport recorded 33 mm.

    Southeast New Brunswick also had several centimetres of snow earlier today which mainly stuck to grassy areas.

    Winter hits northern NB

    Bathurst snow

    NB Route 8 between Bathurst and Allardville, 17 Nov 2017 (Facebook/RCMP)

    A fall storm brought heavy rain to Southern New Brunswick but rain changed to snow in northern New Brunswick today giving the region its first taste of winter this season.

    RCMP were asking drivers to slow down and pay attention to the conditions as snow accumulated on highways.

    Up to 10 cm of snow fell in some parts of the north with Bathurst reporting about 4 cm.

    In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 8 C in the morning and fell to 3 C by mid-afternoon when snow mixed in with rain.

    Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

    An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

    Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

    Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

    Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

    Rain is welcome relief

    Drought2017

    Autumn 2017 – Abnormally dry (YELLOW), Moderate drought (TAN), courtesy Agriculture Canada


    Central New Brunswick is experiencing a moderate drought while much of the rest of the province is abnormally dry except for the Acadian Peninsula according to Agriculture Canada.

    Forecasters say two weather systems could bring as much as 100 mm of rain on Thursday and Friday which is welcome relief for a prolonged dry period which began in early summer.

    Environment Canada has issued rainfall warnings for western and southern New Brunswick but the Southeast is expecting less than 40 mm.

    Meantime, more record highs were broken across the Maritimes today as southerly air continued to push temperatures well into the 20’s C.