Finally above freezing!

Tracks on frozen reservoir in Irishtown Nature Park, Moncton, 10 March 2019 (Dearing)

For the first time in 12 days, the daytime high in Greater Moncton finally climbed above freezing with a balmy high of 1°C today!

The normal maximum for early March in Southeast New Brunswick is 2°C with a minimum of -8°C.

The last third of winter has been especially cold with overnights consistently below -10°C and even as low as -20.1°C early Friday.

However, there is some good news – Environment Canada is forecasting that the next five out of six days will have highs above freezing.

Snow ushers in new year

About 12 cm snow fell in Moncton on New Year’s Day, 01 Jan 2019 (Dearing)

New Year’s Eve celebrations were just getting started in Greater Moncton when snow flurries began falling from the latest low pressure system moving through the region.

By the time the snow stopped late this afternoon about 12 cm had fallen in Southeast New Brunswick with higher amounts toward the north and east.

Rain had been expected but the temperature never climbed above freezing as forecast.

In the wake of the storm, strong northwesterly winds will usher in frigid air creating windchill values near minus 30 and a risk of frostbite.

Busy hurricane season predicted

HurricaneTripleThreat

From left to right, Hurricanes Katia, Irma, Jose, 08 Sept 2017 (Earth Wind Map)

The Canadian Hurricane Centre is forecasting 10 to 16 named storms with five to nine becoming hurricanes this year.

One to four hurricanes is likely to be major with sustained winds of at least 178 km/h.

But 2018 is not expected to be as busy as 2017 which had 17 named storms with 10 hurricanes including a trio of destructive cyclones – Harvey, Irma and Maria.

Three storms made it into Canada’s response zone but none made landfall.

Although the season doesn’t officially start until June 1st, a subtropical storm named Alberto has already formed off the Yucatan Peninsula and will churn north across the Gulf of Mexico this weekend toward the U.S Gulf Coast.

TWN unveils spring forecast

TWN spring

The Weather Network has taken a look ahead at the months of March, April and May for Atlantic Canada…

While it has been a relatively mild winter across the region, winter will still have several parting shots, including the threat for a few Nor’easters.

For some places, the biggest snowfall of the year could still be on the horizon (keep in mind the context – some areas have not had a classic winter storm).

Back and forth temperature swings should come close to offsetting, but with more potential for warmth to outweigh the periods of colder weather.

An active storm track will tap into subtropical moisture at times and bring above normal precipitation to most of the region through the spring season.

Heavy snow buries Moscow

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Plowing snow near St. Basil’s Cathedral, Red Square, Moscow, Russia, 05 Feb 2018 (Maximov/AFP)


The first weekend of February was marked by freezing rain and periods of heavy snow in the Russian capital city.

Moscow has been buried with more than 60 cm of snow which has shattered previous records, caused massive power outages and led to a rare ‘snow day’ for school students on Monday.

Drivers were urged to stay home as the so-called “snowfall of the century” downed over 2,000 trees and even the Russian army was deployed to help dig out.

The Russian weather agency was forecasting a low of -17 C by early Tuesday and another 8 cm of snow could fall in the next few days.

Brief Arctic Blast

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Courtesy The Weather Network

The wind chill was so bitterly cold in Greater Moncton early this morning, it felt more like -35 as the temperature fell to -22 C.

However, the Arctic blast will be short-lived as a Colorado Low approaches the Maritimes with snow, rain and milder temperatures.

Environment Canada is forecasting highs of 8 C by later this week in Southeast New Brunswick.

But by the weekend, temperatures will plummet once again with a low of -16 C expected by early Saturday morning.

Accuweather unveils Canada summer forecast

canada summer 2014 After a long, severe winter and a topsy turvy spring, many Canadians are looking forward to summer and Accuweather has unveiled its forecast for the upcoming season.

While temperatures are expected to be near normal in the Maritimes, precipitation could be slightly above normal with higher amounts of humidity.

June and July are expected to be slightly cooler thanks to a persistent dip in the jet stream and August should be warmer than usual.