Sunshine and dandelions 

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Dandelions growing in NE Moncton, 13 May 2017 (Dearing)

The dandelions are out in full force as Southeast New Brunswick welcomed a beautiful, sunny day following a cold, grey and rainy week.

The normal high in Greater Moncton for mid-May is 17 C and temperatures didn’t even reach 10 C for two days in a row.

Rainfall has already reached 87 mm and the normal monthly total is 93 mm.

Forecasters are calling for 20-30 mm rain early next week thanks to another low pressure system.

Winter returns to the U.K.

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Snow covers a vehicle in Aviemore, Scotland, UK, 25 April 2017 (BBC Weather)


Arctic air has enveloped the United Kingdom with heavy snow in Scotland and northern England and near freezing temperatures as far south as London.

Forecasters say snow in late April is not uncommon and actually fell over parts of the country around the same time last year.

Temperatures struggled to reach 10 C today after a hard frost early this morning.

This cold snap is a far cry from record breaking heat earlier this month when the thermometer climbed to 26 C in southern England and a mild March which was the fifth warmest ever for the U.K.

Nor’easter not as bad as expected

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Snow begins falling in NE Moncton, 14 March 2017 (Dearing)

An intense Nor’easter moved into New Brunswick last night from the U.S.Eastern Seaboard with heavy, wet snow and high winds creating blowing snow and poor visibility.

Snow switched over to rain over southern and central New Brunswick with a
brief period of freezing rain and ice pellets.

Forecasters had originally said up to 45 cm of snow could fall in parts of the province.

Summary of snowfall in centimetres:

Bathurst 30
Kouchibouguac 26
Fredericton 20
Edmundston 18
Moncton 17
Miramichi 16
Saint John 15

Summary of maximum winds in kilometres per hour:

Grand Manan 102
Saint John 102
Miramichi 81
Fredericton 80
Moncton 78
CFB Gagetown 72
Kouchibouguac 61

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Nor’easter replacing frigid air

Screenshot (76)_LIThe last week of winter in New Brunswick has felt more like January than March but that frigid air is about to be replaced by a powerful Nor’easter forming off the U.S. Eastern Seaboard from two low pressure systems.

Overnight temperatures plunged to -20.1 C in Greater Moncton on the weekend which is close to a record low and daytime highs remained well below freezing with dangerous wind chills as low as -35 at times.

Environment Canada says heavy snow and winds creating blowing snow will move into southwestern New Brunswick Tuesday afternoon and spread to the remainder of the province in the evening.

Snow will likely change to rain by early Wednesday with most areas of the province expected to receive up to 30 cm of snow.

Before the storm reaches the Maritimes, forecasters say the Nor’easter could drop between 30 and 50 cm of snow in the U.S. Northeast from Washington DC to New York to Boston.

First Nor’easter of season coming

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Courtesy Facebook/Maritime Weather Agency

A Nor’easter will track south of Nova Scotia on Sunday delivering a mixture of rain, snow and possibly freezing rain or ice pellets to much of the Maritimes.

Environment Canada says rain is expected over southeastern New Brunswick near midday Sunday before changing to snow in the afternoon and spreading northward.

Significant snowfall is possible over eastern regions of the province Sunday evening but forecasters still have some uncertainty about the exact track of this system.

Strong northeast winds will develop late Sunday over the Gulf of St. Lawrence with rough surf and high water levels along the Acadian coast and the Bay of Chaleur.

Hurricane Otto strikes Central America

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Heavy rain and flooding swept away bridges in Costa Rica, 25 Nov 2016 (Reuters)

Otto has become the strongest storm so late in the Atlantic hurricane season to make landfall.

Otto struck the coast of Nicaragua and Costa Rica as a category 2 hurricane but has since been downgraded to a tropical storm as it weakens in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

Forecasters say exceptionally high sea surface temperatures of around 29 C added extra fuel to the storm which delivered a month’s worth of rain in a few hours.

Officials say the death toll was nine but could have been higher if the storm had hit major population centres.

Turbulent Thanksgiving!

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Floodwaters on Whitney Ave. in Sydney, NS, 10 Oct 2016 (Twitter)

Parts of Cape Breton Island received more than 200 mm of rain over the Thanksgiving weekend along with strong winds which flooded basements and washed out roads.

Mainland Nova Scotia including Halifax had more than 100 mm of rain and damaging winds which brought down trees and power lines causing widespread power outages.

Forecasters say a low pressure system fuelled by Matthew’s moisture brought the severe weather which also affected central Newfoundland where a state of emergency was declared in several communities.

The storm was less severe in New Brunswick with about 48 mm of rain in Greater Moncton with winds at times gusting more than 70 km/h.

Snowtober in Saskatchewan!

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Snow in Saskatoon, SK, 05 Oct 2016 (Twitter)


A storm being dubbed Snowtober – Snow in October – has dropped as much as 40 cm of snow on parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Saskatoon received about 20 cm of snow which broke a 100-year-old record yesterday of 5.6 cm while Cypress Hills Park got 40 cm.

Forecasters say the snow cover may stick around for a few days with single digit highs in the long range outlook.

The normal daytime high in Saskatoon for early October is 14 C.

Matthew causes mayhem in Caribbean

mattOne of the most powerful Atlantic hurricanes in recent history, Matthew is swirling in the Caribbean with Haiti in its direct path.

The category 4 storm with sustained winds of 220 km/h and heavy rains causing flooding have forced thousands in Haiti and Jamaica to emergency shelters.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Matthew may lose some steam as it moves across Haiti, eastern Cuba and the Bahamas.

Forecasters currently believe Matthew will remain close to Florida and offshore to the east but caution its path could change.

Weather Network unveils fall forecast

fall2016If you liked this summer in Southeast New Brunswick, chances are you will like this autumn too as the Weather Network unveils its fall 2016 forecast.

Warm, sunny days are expected to continue for at least the first half of fall.

After a dry summer, rainfall will be near normal with the first snow possible by late November.

Forecasters will be keeping a close eye on the Atlantic hurricane season and how it may affect the Maritimes especially since it is already off to a busy start.