Early blast of Arctic air

The jet stream took a big dip south this week allowing Arctic air to envelop the eastern United States and eastern Canada.

Temperatures dropped to freezing all the way to the Gulf of Mexico.

Meteorologists say the early icy blast was more typical of January than mid-November.

New record lows were set in Ontario where CFB Borden fell to -24°C and Toronto Pearson Airport dropped to -14°C.

The coldest low of the season was set in Greater Moncton today at -10°C and just a couple degrees shy of the record.

The Southeast New Brunswick forecast calls for a roller coaster ride this weekend followed by more seasonable temperatures next week.

Chilly nights!

Last Zero
The last couple of nights have been chilly across New Brunswick with overnight lows in the low single digits.

While Greater Moncton fell to 5.5°C which was a few degrees away from the record, the same minimum in Bouctouche was cold enough to set a new low.

Edmundston dipped to a nippy 1.1°C which tied its record as did Grand Manan when it dropped to 3.8°C.

Over the last six years in Greater Moncton, the chart above shows temperatures have not fallen to the freezing point or lower after early June.

Frost advisory!

Desmoiselles Beach, Hopewell Rocks, 12 May 2019 (Dearing)

The Victoria Day long weekend marks the unofficial start of the summer season in Canada when opening up the cottage or camping are on the agenda.

However, many residents are still wearing heavy, winter jackets and gloves as daytime highs struggle to reach 10°C in Southeast New Brunswick.

The normal maximum in Greater Moncton is about 18°C but the long range forecast shows it won’t be that warm for another six days!

Environment Canada has issued a frost advisory for all of New Brunswick and most of mainland Nova Scotia as the overnight low drops to near freezing.

On the upside, the advisory means the growing season is now officially underway but on the downside, it’s not warm enough to plant anything.

May 2018 – Warm days, cold nights

Magnolia trees in bloom at Moncton City Hall, 16 May 2018 (Dearing)

While daytime highs were near or slightly above normal during May in Greater Moncton, overnight lows were chilly with frost and freezing temperatures throughout the month.

Fourteen days had highs of 20 C or more while eight days had lows near or slightly below freezing.

Precipitation was slightly below normal with most of the rainfall recorded during the first third of the month.

By mid-month, the landscape become more colourful as trees and bushes began to bloom and leaf out.

MAY 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  18.1°C

Average LOW  2.5°C

AVERAGE  10.3°C (about 0.3 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  27.8°C (31 May)

Extreme LOW  -2.0°C (12 May)

RAINFALL  82.5 mm (about 15 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Strike number 3!

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Wet, heavy snow in NE Moncton, 14 March 2018 (Dearing)

The third Nor’easter in a week to strike Southeast New Brunswick packed less punch than the other two despite predictions it would be the strongest.

Temperatures remained near freezing in Greater Moncton during the snowfall which made it extremely heavy and wet and strong winds gusted to 85 km/h.

The western and northeastern parts of the province were hardest hit from this storm.

Snowfall totals as of 9pm ADT, 14 March:

  • Miramichi  46 cm
  • Bathurst  40 cm
  • Fredericton  38 cm
  • Saint John  27 cm
  • Greater Moncton  16 cm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  12 cm
  • Charlottetown  5 cm

Peak wind gusts:

  • Grand Etang  146 km/h
  • Lunenburg  104 km/h
  • Sydney  85 km/h
  • Halifax Stanfield  83 km/h

Sunny, cold Remembrance Day

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Remembrance Day 2017 at Sunny Brae cenotaph in Moncton, 11 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

Remembrance Day 2017 was sunny but cold in Greater Moncton.

At 11am, the temperature was near freezing and it was dry with a westerly wind gusting at times to 40 km/h.

Despite the raw wind, it actually seemed warmer this year since in 2016 it was cloudy with a bone-chilling light rain.

Brisk start to September

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Royal Newfoundland Constabulary officers report snow falling in Labrador West, NL, 31 Aug 2017 (Twitter)


Astronomical summer may be officially over but no one expects to see snow at the start of September after a cold front pushed Arctic air southward across Eastern Canada.

With temperatures near freezing, several centimetres of snow fell in northeastern Quebec and Labrador West overnight and drivers say the roads quickly became slushy and slippery.

Greater Moncton felt autumn-like with strong gusty winds under a mostly cloudy sky and temperatures struggled to reach the high teens Celsius.

NB ice storm cleanup continues

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Power pole and lines dangling in NW Moncton, 25 Jan 2017 (Facebook)


Some residents of New Brunswick have been without power for more than 24 hours after the worst ice storm in recent memory.

NB Power has about 250 crews on the ground and more from neighbouring Nova Scotia trying to restore electricity in what officials are calling a “huge weather event”.

By the end of today, the power utility believes 80 percent of customers in Greater Moncton and Sussex will be back on the grid while 60 percent in Shediac, Sackville and Miramichi should be restored.

Warming centres have opened in several communities where residents can seek shelter and charge their electronic devices.

Fortunately temperatures are not very cold and should not fall below freezing until early Friday.

NB under frost advisory

Feeder

Hummingbird feeder awaits visitors in NE Moncton, 18 May 2016 (Dearing)

If you have any sensitive plants outside, bring them indoors tonight!

Frost is possible for all of New Brunswick overnight especially in low-lying areas.

Environment Canada says light winds and clear skies will allow temperatures to fall near freezing by early tomorrow.

The average last spring frost date in Greater Moncton is 24 May while in Saint John it is 18 May.

What a difference a day makes!

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Parlee Beach, NB, 07 May 2016 (Dearing)


Spring can often be volatile in New Brunswick.

Perhaps that explains why Greater Moncton had a daytime high of 22 C yesterday and snow flurries this morning when the temperature fell near freezing.

But unlike last week, this round of chilly weather is not expected to last long with temperatures climbing close to the average high of 16 C for mid-May.