Winter hits northern NB

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frcmpnb%2Fposts%2F10155170549681545%3A0&width=500
A fall storm brought heavy rain to Southern New Brunswick but rain changed to snow in northern New Brunswick today giving the region its first taste of winter this season.

RCMP were asking drivers to slow down and pay attention to the conditions as snow accumulated on highways.

Up to 10 cm of snow fell in some parts of the north with Bathurst reporting about 4 cm.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 8 C in the morning and fell to 3 C by mid-afternoon when snow mixed in with rain.

Advertisements

Cold nights in NB

img_9790

A sunny but cold morning in west end Moncton, 13 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

Clear skies and an Arctic air mass lowered temperatures in Greater Moncton to a chilly -9.0 C on November 12th and 13th.

Recent data shows temperatures that low (within 2 and 3 degrees of record lows) typically don’t occur until later in the month and the thermometer failed to climb above freezing on the 12th which is also earlier than normal.

A new record low was set at the Saint John Airport when it fell to -11.3 C on the 12th.

Quite a contrast from just a week ago when several communities in New Brunswick climbed into the low 20s Celsius.

Sunny, cold Remembrance Day

img_9784

Remembrance Day 2017 at Sunny Brae cenotaph in Moncton, 11 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

Remembrance Day 2017 was sunny but cold in Greater Moncton.

At 11am, the temperature was near freezing and it was dry with a westerly wind gusting at times to 40 km/h.

Despite the raw wind, it actually seemed warmer this year since in 2016 it was cloudy with a bone-chilling light rain.

First snow of the season!

img_9739

Snow falling in west end Moncton, 10 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

A low pressure system moved into New Brunswick today bringing heavy rain accompanied by a vigorous cold front with Arctic air behind it.

As a result, the temperature in Greater Moncton plunged dramatically in just one hour – from a daytime high of 10.3 C at 11am to only 1.8 C by noon.

The thermometer continued to drop below freezing and rain turned to snow before the sky cleared in the late afternoon.

Environment Canada is forecasting a cold but dry weekend with sunshine and temperatures at or slightly above freezing.

Dramatic drop in temperature

img_9621

Irishtown Reservoir, Moncton, 05 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

Autumn has made an abrupt return to Southeast New Brunswick.

The passage of a cold front lowered daytime highs in Greater Moncton from a near record of 19.3 C to a below seasonal high of 5.2 C over the past 24 hours.

Temperatures are poised to drop even lower later this week when the first blast of Arctic air this season moves into the Maritimes.

Environment Canada is forecasting a low of -7 C by early Saturday which will likely mean a hard, killing frost for any remaining sensitive vegetation.

Record highs across Maritimes 

Wildflowers and annuals in northeast Moncton, 03 Nov 2017 (Dearing)


A warm southerly flow allowed temperatures in the Maritimes to climb into the low 20s C yesterday with record highs broken in all three provinces. 

Bouctouche was the hot spot in New Brunswick at 21.1 C which was the same record high set at St. Peters, Prince Edward Island. 

Greenwood, Nova Scotia reached a summer-like maximum of 25.5 C which was the warmest in Canada. 

A new high was also set at the Greater Moncton International Airport at 19.7 C edging out a record from 1999. 

After a cold front moved through the region with some much needed rain, temperatures fell back to more seasonal values. 

October 2017 – Second warmest since 1881

Many trees are losing leaves in west end Moncton, 27 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

October often felt like August in Greater Moncton with 12 days reaching daytime highs of 20 C or higher.

Environment Canada says only October 1913 was slightly warmer since records began in 1881.

Temperatures did fall below freezing on 7 days with some scattered frost but the month escaped a hard frost and vegetation continued to flourish.

Rainfall was more than 30 percent below normal in Southeast New Brunswick continuing a prolonged dry period which began in early summer.

OCTOBER 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 17.7 C

Average LOW 5.0 C

AVERAGE 11.4 C (about 3.8 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 23.7 C (08 Oct)

Extreme LOW -1.8 C (13 Oct)

RAINFALL 76.5 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

Late October heat wave

Along the Riverfront Trail in Moncton, 21 October 2017 (Dearing)

Nine communities across New Brunswick set new record highs yesterday and the same will likely happen again today.

Greater Moncton was the warmest spot in the province climbing to 23.1 C which broke the old maximum temperature of 22.8 C from 1928.

Greenwood was among six communities in Nova Scotia breaking records with a high of 24.5 C.

Four records fell on Prince Edward Island including Charlottetown at 21.7 C.

Environment Canada says the Maritimes is enjoying a late October heat wave because the region is sandwiched between low pressure and high pressure allowing warm, southerly air to move northward.

Fall colours reach peak

FallOct9.17

Centennial Park (top) and Irishtown Nature Park (bottom), Moncton, 09 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

Mother Nature is putting on a great show this autumn with brilliant hues of red, yellow and orange throughout Southeast New Brunswick. 

The tourism department says fall colours have reached their peak across northern New Brunswick and are near peak in the rest of the province. 

On Thanksgiving Monday, I had a chance to capture images of the amazing fall foliage in Greater Moncton at Centennial Park and Irishtown Nature Park.