Growing seasons in Greater Moncton

Growing Season

Data courtesy Environment Canada

After taking a look at the past seven growing seasons in Greater Moncton including 2019, the last freezing temperature in Greater Moncton in the spring has been recorded from a month-long period from early May to early June.

Meantime in the fall, the first freezing temperature has been recorded from a month-long period from mid-September to mid-October.

The total number of days above freezing during the growing season has ranged from as little as 111 days to as many as 155 days – a difference of more than one month.

Frost advisory!

Desmoiselles Beach, Hopewell Rocks, 12 May 2019 (Dearing)

The Victoria Day long weekend marks the unofficial start of the summer season in Canada when opening up the cottage or camping are on the agenda.

However, many residents are still wearing heavy, winter jackets and gloves as daytime highs struggle to reach 10°C in Southeast New Brunswick.

The normal maximum in Greater Moncton is about 18°C but the long range forecast shows it won’t be that warm for another six days!

Environment Canada has issued a frost advisory for all of New Brunswick and most of mainland Nova Scotia as the overnight low drops to near freezing.

On the upside, the advisory means the growing season is now officially underway but on the downside, it’s not warm enough to plant anything.

Canada’s Top 10 Weather Stories 2018

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Wildfires create smoky sky over downtown Calgary, AB, 14 Aug 2018 (Dearing)

Here is the annual list from Environment Canada:

  1. Record wildfires and smoky summer skies in the West
  2. Summer heat wave from East to West
  3. Tough growing season in the Prairies
  4. Powerful May winds impact Ontario and Quebec
  5. September tornadoes touch down in Ottawa-Gatineau
  6. Spring flooding in southern British Columbia
  7. Historic spring flooding along the St. John River Valley
  8. August deluge in Toronto
  9. Record cold start to a long winter nationwide
  10. Cold and stormy April for the East

 

Frost forms under harvest moon

A clear night under a brilliant harvest moon lowered the temperature to -1.9°C in Greater Moncton this morning with some scattered frost.

Most sensitive vegetation survived as the thermometer fell below zero for less than six hours.

Many weather stations across New Brunswick had readings near or a few degrees below freezing.

On average, the first fall frost date in Moncton is 02 October with an growing season of 131 days.

However, a record breaking low of -3.2°C on 04 June brought a late frost (about two weeks later than usual) which proved devastating for farmers and gardeners.

So despite enjoying a long and warm summer, the frost-free season lasted 112 days which is about 19 days shorter than usual.

A chilly start!

It may have been the warmest summer in the Maritimes in almost a century but some parts of the region woke up to below freezing temperatures and frost this morning!

That means some areas had a growing season which barely lasted 100 days since the last spring frost for many was 04 June.

Greater Moncton was definitely chilly with an early morning low of 3.0°C which was close to the record low of 1.1°C from 1956.

Here are some of the nippy overnight lows:

  • Edmundston, NB  -2.0°C
  • Woodstock, NB  -0.8°C
  • Red Pines, NB  -0.7°C
  • Fredericton, NB  0.1°C
  • Upper Stewiacke, NS  -0.4°C
  • Maple Plains, PEI  1.4°C

Record lows in Maritimes

Temp0degrees
We are now several weeks into the growing season and temperatures are dropping to dangerously cold lows.

Farmers are concerned about damage to crops after a cool air mass and clear skies led to a frigid low of -4 C in parts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia overnight.

Greater Moncton dropped to -3.2 C early today which broke the old record of -2.2 C from 1903 and records go back to 1881.

The following new record lows were set on 04 June:

  • Kouchibouguac National Park, NB -3.8 C (records since 1924)
  • Grand Manan, NB -2.2 C (records since 1883)
  • Port Hawkesbury, NS -2.6 C (records since 1875)
  • Ingonish, NS -2.2 C (records since 1950)
  • Summerside, PEI -1.9 C (records since 1898)
  • Charlottetown, PEI -1.0 C (records since 1872)

Last frost of spring?

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Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)


When the temperature dropped to -0.3 C early this morning, frost could be found in Greater Moncton.

The coldest low in New Brunswick was -5.9 C at Edmundston!

Thanks to cool, dry air with no cloud cover, Environment Canada has issued another frost advisory for tonight.

But keep in mind it’s not that unusual based on the 30-year average (1981-2010).

The average last spring frost date is 23 May in Greater Moncton and the first fall frost is 2 October for a growing season of 131 days.

2016 was warm in Greater Moncton

moncton2016seasons

Clockwise from top left: Jan 2016 Moncton, May 2016 Moncton, Aug 2016 Kouchibouguac N.P., Oct 2016 Moncton

The average annual temperature for 2016 in Greater Moncton was 6.4 C which was one degree above the 1981-2010 period according to data from Environment Canada.

Precipitation was below normal with 995 mm recorded (1200 mm is average over the same thirty years) broken down as 689 mm of rain and 297 cm of snow.

The highest temperature of the year was 30.5 C on 28 July while the lowest was -22.1 C recorded on 17 December.

The growing season stretched from mid-May to early October which gave Moncton about 142 frost-free days, slightly higher than the average of 127.

Frosty!

frost

Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)


Scattered frost has dotted the landscape of Greater Moncton a couple of times in the last week or so.

But the thermometer dipped below freezing early today to -1.5 C which brought widespread frost and effectively put an end to the growing season.

The last time it fell below zero was 15 May which means 2016 had about 142 frost-free days.

A killing frost!

Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)

Frost covers a maple leaf (Twitter)


The 2015 growing season is officially over in Greater Moncton.

A killing frost occurred overnight when the thermometer dipped to a low of -2.1 C which is the lowest value in Southeast New Brunswick since late April.

Temperatures were typically a bit colder in the northern part of the province, bottoming out at -5.0 C in Edmundston.