Back to the Beach

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 11 June 2017 (Dearing)


Although I walked along Parlee Beach earlier this spring, my first official beach day of the season was a visit to Aboiteau Beach in Cap-Pele yesterday. 

Under a mostly sunny sky, the afternoon high soared above 30 C although the water of the Northumberland Strait was a lot cooler. 

Signage indicated the water quality was good for swimming. 

The only minor downside was the wind which at times gusted to more than 80 km/h creating mini sand storms on the beach. 

Nova Scotia hit hardest by late winter blast

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Barely two days after a blizzard, yet another snowstorm is slamming the Maritimes.

Environment Canada says mainland Nova Scotia has been┬áthe hardest hit this time with up to 75 cm along the South Shore – a one day March record.

In Southeast New Brunswick, strong, gusty winds prompted a blowing snow advisory for Greater Moncton along with another 20 cm snow.

Unbelievable snow across the Maritimes

This is what Moncton family found when they opened their door today, 16 March 2015 (Facebook)

This is what Moncton family found when they opened their door today, 16 March 2015 (Facebook)


Yet another blizzard has battered the Maritimes with heavy snow and blowing snow throughout the region.

Greater Moncton received 44 cm of snow which is on top of the 93 cm already on the ground.

Prince Edward Island had at least 50 cm and Cape Breton Island was also hard hit by the storm with Sydney getting walloped with almost 60 cm.

Portions of the Trans Canada Highway had to be shut down, the Confederation Bridge was closed, flights were cancelled and Champlain Place Mall didn’t open for two days in a row.

Officials at Poley Mountain Ski Resort near Sussex reported 75 cm of fresh powder today which will likely mean an extended season on the slopes.

1-2-3 Punch from Old Man Winter!

Flying over Dieppe-Scoudouc TCH interchange, 01 Feb 2015

Flying over Dieppe-Scoudouc TCH interchange, 01 Feb 2015 (Dearing)

City of Moncton officials are starting to wonder if the snow will stop long enough so that crews can do a proper job of snow removal.

Prior to the start of today’s blizzard late this afternoon – the third major storm in a week – the weather office noted that 68 cm of snow was lying on the ground at the Greater Moncton International Airport.

With 40 cm of snow in the forecast for Southeast New Brunswick, the region could be left with almost 110 cm on the ground – not to mention high drifts from strong, gusty winds.

Shopping malls closed early and city buses were pulled off the streets by 6pm to ensure most residents got home before the blizzard hit.

Nor’easter brings rain, wind and snow to N.B.

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

At the height of the Nor’easter, the rain/snow line across New Brunswick stretched from Charlotte County to Grand Lake to Miramichi.

Greater Moncton received steady rain this weekend with 52 mm reported as of 5pm AST while snow and ice pellets fell in Fredericton and up to 30 cm snow expected for western and northern New Brunswick.

Thousands across the province lost power during the storm due to strong, gusty winds and heavy snow bringing down tree branches.

The same storm also brought early season snow to the Eastern United States mostly in the Appalachian Mountains from South Carolina to Maine.

Cristobal will have some impact on Atlantic Canada

track(2)Hurricane Cristobal continues to churn in the Atlantic tonight, about 450 km east-southeast of Cape Hatteras and racing northeastward toward the Grand Banks.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre says Cristobal will likely merge with a cold front moving southward over Atlantic Canada.

Forecasters say the result will be periods of heavy rain, gusty winds and fall-like temperatures for the Maritimes and Newfoundland by Friday.

Bertha spares Maritimes, heading for Newfoundland

Forecast for 07 August 2014

Forecast for 07 August 2014

The remnants of Bertha, downgraded today to a non-tropical storm system, have spared the Maritimes and are now heading for eastern Newfoundland.

Forecasters say rain and gusty winds – up to 70 km/h – are likely for St. John’s and the Avalon Peninsula tomorrow.

Showers, thunderstorms and cool temperatures will persist in Southeast New Brunswick tomorrow due to a low pressure system which is being held in place thanks to Bertha.

July 2014 – Amazing summer so far!

Alma, NB, 01 July 2014 (Dearing)

Alma, NB, 01 July 2014 (Dearing)

With warm temperatures and plenty of sunshine, residents of Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick could not have asked for a better July.

Environment Canada says the average temperature during the month was 2.3 C above the thirty year average while rainfall was about 20 percent above normal.

The only spoiler was Arthur – a nasty post-tropical storm which pounded the province on 05 July with gusty winds at times stronger than hurricane force bringing down trees and power lines.

Thousands went without electricity for days in the Fredericton area.

JULY 2014 ALMANAC (at the Greater Moncton International Airport)

Average HIGH. 26.9 C

Average LOW. 15.3 C

AVERAGE. 21.1 C (about 2.3 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH. 31.3 C (01 July)

Extreme LOW. 11.3 (05, 06 July)

Rainfall 112.6 mm (about 20 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada based on period 1981-2010)

Aftermath of Arthur

Courtesy TWN

Courtesy TWN

Arthur packed quite a punch across the Maritimes yesterday with strong, gusty winds along the Bay of Fundy, across southern New Brunswick and Nova Scotia’s Annapolis Valley.

Environment Canada is also reporting impressive rainfall amounts with a whopping 143 mm at St. Stephen – more than a month’s worth of rain in less than 24 hours!

Meantime, rain was light across Prince Edward Island, eastern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton.

Greater Moncton seems to have been spared the worst of Arthur with a peak wind gust of 67 km/h and about 36 mm of rain.

Arthur downgraded to post-tropical storm

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

Arthur made landfall in the Maritimes as a post-tropical storm near Meteghan, Nova Scotia around 7:30 a.m. today.

Forecasters at the Canadian Hurricane Centre say winds are strongest to the right of the storm in the Annapolis Valley (topping 140 km/h) and rain has been heaviest to the left of the storm in central and southern New Brunswick (over 150 mm).

More than 200,000 customers have lost power in the region with social media users reporting flooding and downed trees in Saint John, Fredericton and Halifax.

In Greater Moncton, periods of heavy rain and gusty winds have been ongoing since this morning with leaves, branches and even a few trees coming down.