Snow swipes Nova Scotia

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Courtesy NS Department of Transportation

An intense low pressure system off the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia brushed the eastern portion of the province and Cape Breton Island with heavy snow.

New Brunswick, northern Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island were spared from this storm.

The eastern part of Cape Breton was the hardest hit with almost 35 cm of snow recorded in the Sydney area.

Here are snowfall totals as of 9am ADT, 09 April (in cm):

  • Sydney  34.6
  • Cheticamp  22
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  23.4
  • Dartmouth  14
  • Bedford  10
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Nor’easter number four!

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Moncton’s west end after the latest Nor’easter, 23 March 2018 (Dearing)

It seems a bit strange the largest single snowfall this winter in Greater Moncton actually occurred on the second full day of spring.

Environment Canada says Southeast New Brunswick hit the snow jackpot from the fourth Nor’easter this month with more than 30 cm recorded.

A storm on 30 January was the previous snowfall event winner with almost 25 cm.

Strong winds were also a factor in this storm gusting at times to 82 km/h.

Here are some other snowfall totals:

  • Kentville, NS  24 cm
  • Alma, NB  20 cm
  • Yarmouth, NS  18 cm
  • Sussex, NB  17 cm
  • Charlottetown, PEI  12 cm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, NS  11 cm
  • Bathurst, NB  8 cm
  • Saint John, NB  6 cm

Strike number 3!

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Wet, heavy snow in NE Moncton, 14 March 2018 (Dearing)

The third Nor’easter in a week to strike Southeast New Brunswick packed less punch than the other two despite predictions it would be the strongest.

Temperatures remained near freezing in Greater Moncton during the snowfall which made it extremely heavy and wet and strong winds gusted to 85 km/h.

The western and northeastern parts of the province were hardest hit from this storm.

Snowfall totals as of 9pm ADT, 14 March:

  • Miramichi  46 cm
  • Bathurst  40 cm
  • Fredericton  38 cm
  • Saint John  27 cm
  • Greater Moncton  16 cm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  12 cm
  • Charlottetown  5 cm

Peak wind gusts:

  • Grand Etang  146 km/h
  • Lunenburg  104 km/h
  • Sydney  85 km/h
  • Halifax Stanfield  83 km/h

Winter storm 2 of 3

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Traffic on a snowy West Main Street, Moncton, 08 March 2018 (Dearing)

The second of three winter storms in less than a week has delivered another dumping of snow but this time it was more evenly distributed throughout the Maritimes.

The snow was heavy and wet especially in Southeast New Brunswick.

Snow totals courtesy of Environment Canada as of 8:30am Saturday, 10 March:

  • Caraquet, 29 cm
  • Shediac, 27 cm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, 23 cm
  • Bathurst, 20 cm
  • Miramichi, 17 cm
  • Saint John, 17 cm
  • Truro, 17 cm
  • Greater Moncton, 16 cm
  • Summerside, 16 cm
  • Greenwood, 15 cm
  • Charlottetown, 12 cm
  • Halifax Downtown, 9 cm
  • CFB Gagetown, 7 cm

Strong winds were also a factor with peak gusts in km/h:

  • Grand Etang, Cape Breton, 154
  • East Point, PEI, 82
  • Caraquet, 78

Nor’easter packs bigger punch than expected

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The track of the latest Nor’easter hugged the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia which ultimately led to more snow in Southeast New Brunswick than forecasters first thought.

Environment Canada originally predicted 10 cm but more than double fell in Greater Moncton which ended up with the highest snow total in the Maritimes.

This was a classic Nor’easter with strong winds reaching a peak gust of 78 km/h creating blowing and drifting snow in open areas.

Here are some regional totals as of 8am ADT on 31 January:

  • Greater Moncton Airport:  25 cm
  • Halifax International Airport: 23 cm
  • Greenwood: 20
  • Sydney:  20
  • Halifax (downtown): 19
  • Charlottetown:  19
  • Bathurst:  18
  • CFB Gagetown:  14
  • Yarmouth:  13
  • Saint John Airport:  11

A classic Nor’easter slams Maritimes

A classic Nor’easter arrived in the Maritimes today bringing an abrupt end to a snow free Southeast New Brunswick.

Environment Canada says the intensity of the storm led to a snowfall warning and a blowing snow advisory being issued by mid-afternoon for Greater Moncton.

By 6pm, about 16 cm of snow had fallen with winds gusting up to 74 km/h creating poor visibility in blowing snow.

In Nova Scotia, about 16 cm fell in both the city of Halifax and at Stanfield Airport with an impressive 40 cm recorded in Sydney.

Greater Moncton spared worst of storm

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Powerful storm surge causes flooding along the waterfront in Halifax, NS, 05 Jan 2018 (Twitter)

The ‘bomb cyclone’ or ‘snow hurricane’ – featuring a dramatic drop in atmospheric pressure when warm and cold air collided – has left the Maritimes and spared Southeast New Brunswick from the worst of its fury.

While strong winds were a factor throughout the region, Greater Moncton received less snow compared to further north and west.

To the south and east, more rain fell along with hurricane-force winds (up to 200 km/h gusts in western Cape Breton) which created powerful storm surges causing flooding along the coast.

Here are some totals from Environment Canada and local estimates:

  • Greater Moncton Airport  14 cm snow, 10 mm rain, 91 km/h wind gust
  • Bathurst  58 cm snow, 80 km/h wind gust
  • Fredericton  30 cm snow, 78 km/h wind gust
  • Saint John  5 cm snow, 20 mm rain, 87 km/h wind gust
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  40 mm rain, trace snow, 122 km/h wind gust

The storm may have departed but Arctic air has filtered back into the Maritimes which will mean a bitterly cold weekend.

Rain turns to snow!

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Snow covering grassy areas in NE Moncton, 23 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

After an intense late fall storm moved through the Maritimes, strong winds and colder air followed changing rain to snow.

Wind gusts were clocked as high as 139 km/h on the Confederation Bridge prompting a closure this morning.

Rainfall amounts were heavy in many areas including Greater Moncton at 43 mm, Saint John at 56 mm and Halifax Stanfield Airport recorded 33 mm.

Southeast New Brunswick also had several centimetres of snow earlier today which mainly stuck to grassy areas.

Dry July in Southeast N.B.

Grass turning brown in NE Moncton, 26 July 2017 (Dearing)

Lawns are turning brown and gardens are thirsty in Southeast New Brunswick given the light amount of precipitation recorded so far this month.

Environment Canada says 29.8 mm of rain has fallen this July in Greater Moncton compared to an average of 92.1 mm – just under one-third of normal.

No significant rainfall is expected before the end of the month.

By contrast, parts of neighbouring Nova Scotia have been much wetter than normal with 135 mm to date at Halifax Stanfield Airport.

Another winter storm wallops N.B.

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The snowbanks keep getting higher in NW Moncton, 16 Feb 2017 (Facebook)

An intense low pressure system tracked across the Maritimes today bringing heavy snow along with strong northerly winds creating blowing and drifting snow.

Environment Canada says this was the fourth storm system to impact Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick over the last two weeks.

Visibility was often very poor and the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization restricted travel to snow plows and emergency vehicles on many major highways today.

Snowfall totals:

Greater Moncton: 35 cm

Saint John: 25 cm

Fredericton: 20 cm

Charlottetown: 15 cm

Greenwood, NS: 40 cm

Halifax Stanfield Airport: 15 cm