Canada’s Top 10 Weather Stories 2019

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Hurricane Dorian damage in Halifax’s west end, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Canada is a land of weather extremes and this year has been no exception with frigid winter cold and stifling summer heat which brought wildfires, flooding, snowstorms and hurricanes.

Environment Canada has compiled its annual list for 2019:

  1. Another record Ottawa River flood
  2. Destructive hurricane season especially Dorian
  3. Snowy Prairie autumn
  4. Bitterly cold February nationwide
  5. Record heat continues in the Arctic
  6. Too dry early, too wet later on Prairies
  7. Blustery Halloween in the East
  8. Spring never arrives in Eastern Canada
  9. More flooding along the St. John River
  10. Fewer wildfires but more hectares burned

Here are some weather highlights for Atlantic Canada:

  • New Year’s Day takes Newfoundland by storm
  • January Maritime storm included every type of weather
  • Winter storm forces Moncton residents outside
  • February storm causes road closures in Labrador
  • Pre-Valentine’s storm across the Maritimes
  • March starts out stormy in Nova Scotia
  • Newfoundland’s icebergs please tourists and locals
  • October “weather bomb” drops lots of rain

October 2019 – Gradual easing into fall

Centennial Park, Moncton, 14 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Daytime highs were consistently in the mid-teens in Southeast New Brunswick during October which usually sees a sharp drop in temperature as the month progresses.

The average temperature was 0.7°C above normal in Greater Moncton with two days failing to reach 10°C and the warmest maximum on the last day, 19.3°C.

Six days had lows below freezing with some light frost but there was no hard freeze allowing vegetation to flourish.

The precipitation total mostly came from five rainfall events with not a single snowflake recorded.

Fall foliage peaked prior to Thanksgiving weekend and several strong wind events left few leaves on trees by Halloween night.

OCTOBER 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 13.5°C

Average LOW 3.0°C

AVERAGE 8.3°C (about 0.7 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 19.3°C (31 Oct)

Extreme LOW -2.7°C (27 Oct)

RAINFALL 102.7 mm (slightly BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

A Blustery Halloween!

Fallen leaves, Centennial Park, Moncton, 14 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Fewer trick or treaters are expected to be spooking neighbourhoods in Greater Moncton thanks to heavy rain and strong winds.

A low pressure system could bring at least 30 mm of rain to Southeast New Brunswick over the next 24 hours.

Potentially hurricane-strength winds are expected tomorrow ahead of a cold front but temperatures will be warm reaching the high teens.

Environment Canada has issued wind warnings with gusts from 60-90 km/h and possibly up to 110 km/h in the Tantramar Marsh.

Forecasters say the wind may cause damage to buildings such as to roof shingles and windows.

The wind may not die down until early Saturday.

Fading tropical storm batters Ontario

Courtesy Weather Nation

The remnants of Tropical Storm Olga were felt across Southern Ontario on the weekend with rainy and windy conditions.

Environment Canada says between 30 and 60 mm of rain fell across the region including the Greater Toronto Area.

Wind gusts were up to 80 km/h in some locations with a peak of 104 km/h recorded at Port Colborne on Lake Erie.

Olga formed in the Gulf of Mexico several days ago and made landfall in Louisiana before quickly churning northward toward the Great Lakes.

Forecasters are calling for more wet weather and cooler conditions by Halloween.

U.S. East Coast braces for “Frankenstorm”

Projected path of Sandy, 26 October 2012 (courtesy NOAA)

Hurricane Sandy continues to barrel north as the lowest category hurricane just as a winter storm moves across the west and Arctic air streams south.

Forecasters say if they meet over New Jersey or New York by Tuesday morning, it could create a big mess with rain, wind, high tides, snow and possibly even tornadoes.

Being dubbed “Frankenstorm” due to its Halloween week arrival, utility companies are already preparing for expected power outages and residents on the U.S. East Coast are being told to take necessary precautions.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre is tracking the storm and says Southern Ontario will likely be impacted the most by high winds although wind and rain are also likely for the Maritimes.

Atlantic Canada’s Top 5 Weather Stories of 2011

Snowy North Moncton 13 January 2011

1.  Nasty Nor’easters – A series of powerful Nor’easters impacted the region in January dumping rain, freezing rain and mostly snow and started to bury Greater Moncton for the season.

2.  Blizzard Buries – After six winters living in Greater Moncton, this blizzard on 27 January was one of the worst mainly because of gusty winds (up to 70 km/h) driving the heavy, wet snow (about 30 cm).  Schools closed, RCMP urged drivers off roads and even shopping malls shut down.

3.  Moncton Snowed Under – On 15 and 16 February, 120 cm of snow covered the ground at the Greater Moncton Airport – 1 cm more than the previous record from 1992.  By month end, total winter snowfall accumulation amounted to 327 cm.  Colder-than-normal temperatures and the scarcity of rain were to blame.

4.  Pre-Halloween Spook – A major fall storm on 30 October haunted the Maritimes with high winds, heavy rain and snow.  Winds of 100 km/h caused pounding surf and powerful wind gusts.  The region either got soaked or buried, with 60 mm of rain in Nova Scotia and 20 cm of snow in parts of western and northern New Brunswick.

5.  First Big Wintry Storm – The first significant snowfall of the season on 23 November proved to be record-breaking with the Greater Moncton Airport recording about 25 cm of snow beating the old record of 22 cm from 23 November 1965.  More impressive snow totals were found in Nova Scotia – Halifax Airport 34 cm, Greenwood 37 cm and Sydney Airport 40 cm.