Heat wave ends

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Thundershower as cold front sweeps Greater Moncton, 06 July 2018 (91.9 The Bend)

The passing of a cold front led to showers and thundershowers in Southeast New Brunswick today marking the end of hot, humid weather.

Environment Canada has noted Greater Moncton endured an official heat wave by definition with three straight days of at least 32°C.

The trio of record highs this week:

JULY 3rd : 31.6 C (new), 31.0 C (old record 1984)

JULY 4th : 33.4 C (new), 31.6 C (old record 2013)

JULY 5th : 34.2 C (new), 32.7 C (old record 2013)

The hotspot in New Brunswick on 05 July was a scorching 36.0 C at Miramichi and not far behind was 35.5 C at Kouchibouguac National Park.

As the heat subsides in Eastern Canada, hot weather is building in Western Canada with an impressive record high today of 39.3 C at Val Marie, Saskatchewan.

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Heat wave claims lives

A double rainbow after brief rain shower over Moncton, 04 July 2018 (Dearing)

Temperatures across Eastern Canada from Ontario to the Maritimes continued to soar into the 30s C with humidex values above 40.

Authorities in Quebec say at least 18 people have died, all over age 50, as a warm, humid air mass lingered over the province.

Record highs have been recorded in New Brunswick with a new maximum of 31.6 C at the Greater Moncton International Airport on Tuesday (beating 31.0 C from 1984) and 33.4 C today (beating 31.4 C from 1983).

The hotspot in the province was 34.1 C at St. Stephen.

They’re back!

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Dandelions growing in NE Moncton, 02 May 2018 (Dearing)

Dandelions have made their return to Southeast New Brunswick a little later than usual thanks to a cold spring.

The yellow plants or weeds were spotted today when the temperature climbed to 24.5 C in Greater Moncton – the warmest high so far this year.

The hotspot in New Brunswick was St. Stephen at 29 C and Fredericton was not far behind at 28 C.

But a cold front is pushing through the province which will bring rain and dramatically lower temperatures overnight with single digit highs expected tomorrow.

Welcome to the 30s Club

DorchesterBch01

Shepody Bay from Dorchester Beach, NB, 26 June 2016 (Dearing)


Greater Moncton reached a daytime high of 29.8 C today which is the warmest temperature so far in 2016.

Environment Canada reports at least nine other communities in New Brunswick reached 30 C or higher.

The hotspot was Bathurst at a sizzling 33.3 C.

The warm, windy conditions were not helpful for firefighters near Bouctouche battling a forest fire which was eventually brought under control.

Beautiful First Weekend of Summer!

Flower box

Pansies are flourishing in NE Moncton, 25 June 2016 (Dearing)

The summer season has gotten off to a great start in Southeast New Brunswick with a fabulous first weekend filled with sunshine and warm temperatures.

Greater Moncton climbed to 27.5 C on Saturday and even warmer today at 29.0 C – just shy of the warmest 2016 high of 29.5 C from 31 May.

Kouchibouguac was the hotspot in the province at 33.2 C.

Even with this round of warm weather, June overall is still running about 1 C below normal compared to the 30-year average with only a few days left to go.

Late summer record heat

Jones Lake, Moncton, NB, 17 Sept 2015 (Dearing)

Jones Lake, Moncton, NB, 17 Sept 2015 (Dearing)


A 100-year-old record high was broken today in Moncton according to Environment Canada.

On this date in 1915, the thermometer climbed to 27.8 C but today that high was surpassed with a new record of 29.0 C.

Bathurst, Miramichi and Kouchibouguac all climbed to at least 30.0 C.

Fredericton was the hotspot in New Brunswick and the entire country today at 30.2 C.

Temperatures are running almost 10 degrees above normal for mid-September.

Record scorcher in Manitoba

Courtesy The Weather Network

Courtesy The Weather Network

An unstable air mass brought excessive heat to Manitoba yesterday where it climbed to a record 35.4 C in Swan River – the hotspot in Canada.

Winnipeg was toasty at a record 33.3 C and even Thompson in the province’s far north was very warm at 30.2 C.

But the heat was short-lived when severe thunderstorms rolled across the province and into Ontario.

Temperatures ranged from the high 20’s in Northern Ontario to the low 20’s in Southern Ontario.

Sizzling September heat!

Hot, humid weather made a comeback in Southern Ontario yesterday with humidex values soaring near 45 in some areas.

Environment Canada reported new heat records were set at Toronto Buttonville Airport hitting 35.0°C, Windsor at 34.6°C and Collingwood at 33.7°C.

The hotspot was Sarnia at an unseasonable 35.9°C (almost 97°F).

Some of that heat filtered into New Brunswick today – St. Stephen climbed to 28.5°C with a humidex of 37 and even Moncton reached 23°C with a humidex of 31.

Record heat in NB

The warmest weather so far in 2013 has enveloped New Brunswick.

Due to the heat, Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for the province warning of high humidex values reaching or exceeding 40 in some areas.

In Greater Moncton yesterday, a new record of 31.6°C was set breaking the old one of 31.4°C from 1983.

The hotspot yesterday in New Brunswick was Kouchibouguac at 33.2°C which was also a new record and today it was also a record-setting 33.8°C.

Today, Greater Moncton has broken another record at 32.7°C beating the 1983 record of 30.6°C and the humidex reached a scorching 41.

Hot and humid

Thunderstorm moves into downtown Moncton after a hot afternoon, 31 May 2013 (Dearing)

Thunderstorm moves into downtown Moncton after a hot afternoon, 31 May 2013 (Dearing)

New Brunswick is experiencing its warmest day so far this year and at least eight record highs have been broken.

Environment Canada says the Greater Moncton International Airport broke a record today at 30.8°C beating the old high of 29.3°C from 1999.

Kouchibouguac, Alma, Saint John and Caraquet were among the places with new record highs today.

The hotspot in the province was Fredericton at 32.7°C.

The excessive warmth is due to a dome of high pressure working its way to the Maritimes from down in the Gulf of Mexico.