Erin drenches Maritimes

Post-tropical depression Erin interacted with an incoming low pressure system to produce lots of rain in the Maritimes.

Environment Canada says the heaviest amounts were recorded in northern Nova Scotia and the Annapolis Valley – Parrsboro and Greenwood each had more rain from this storm than all of July and August combined.

Some roads were damaged and even washed out by surface runoff or flooding.

Erin’s direct path along Nova Scotia’s south shore produced wind gusts up to 80 km/h.

The storm brought tropical air with a high of 23°C in Greater Moncton on Friday but a humidex of 32.

Rainfall totals (mm):

  • Parrsboro 162
  • Greenwood 127
  • Kentville 115
  • Summerside 67
  • Fredericton 56
  • Moncton 50
  • Halifax (city) 48

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

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Quiet forest fire season in N.B.

Forest Fire

Forest fire near River Glade, NB, 07 May 2013 (Dearing)

A wet, cold spring and a dry, humid July have led to one of the quietest forest fire seasons in recent memory in New Brunswick.

Statistics show 152 fires for the season to date which compares to 206 fires over the past ten years.

Last year was also much busier with 242 fires recorded by the middle of August.

Provincial wildfire officials say although July was warmer than normal, high humidity levels helped prevent fires from starting and from spreading.

Heat building in the Maritimes

Beach

A fine day at Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 27 July 2019 (Dearing)

A heat warning has been in place since the start of the weekend in much of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia (except for Cape Breton) and Prince Edward Island.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 30 C on Saturday and 29 C today but the forecast calls for 30 C on Monday and 31 C for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Overnight lows are not expected to drop that much either hovering around 18 to 19 C.

While humidity has been relatively low this weekend at around 50 percent or less, Environment Canada says the warm air mass will become more humid this week.

The only relief will be along the Fundy coast where temperatures will stay in the low 20s.

Hottest weather yet?

Saint John River at Perth-Andover, NB, 16 July 2019 (Dearing)

The next heat wave across Eastern Canada could be the warmest period yet this summer with daytime highs in the low 30’s C and humidex values near 40.

Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec have been blanketed with heat warnings from Environment Canada with hot, humid days and warm nights expected this weekend.

Temperatures in the Maritimes for Saturday and Sunday could reach 30 C but a cold front will bring cooler and drier air by Monday.

A mini heat wave already brought highs of 29 C and 30 C earlier this week in Greater Moncton.

Here comes the heat!

The view from Economy Point, NS, 03 July 2019 (Dearing)

After a cool and wet start to summer, a blast of heat is heading to the Maritime Provinces over the next few days.

Environment Canada has issued heat warnings for most of New Brunswick – excluding the Fundy coast – and western Nova Scotia while other areas under a special weather statement.

A warm, humid air mass is moving into the region today raising daytime temperatures to 30°C or more.

Humidex values near 40 are expected and overnight lows may not fall below 18°C providing little relief from the heat.

Near normal values will return late Saturday as a cold front arrives.

Heat warnings are also in place for parts of Ontario and Quebec where it climbed into the low 30s yesterday.

Weather Network unveils summer forecast

TWN Summer 2019

After a cold and wet spring in New Brunswick, what will summer be like?

The Weather Network has unveiled its summer 2019 forecast and if you were hoping for warmer temperatures, it appears you may have to wait a little longer.

TWN suggests the season will be changeable and humid with cool weather in June but warmer than normal temperatures arriving in July stretching into August.

Extended periods of dry weather could lead to short term drought in parts of the Maritimes but overall precipitation will likely be near normal.

What about the spring 2019 forecast from The Weather Network?

TWN noted a cold wave in early March would be followed by a warmer pattern later in the month with more consistent spring-like weather by early April.

Both temperatures and precipitation were expected to be near normal.

So was the seasonal forecast accurate?

While early March was cold in Greater Moncton with a bitter low of -20.1 C, a warmer pattern never really developed except for a brief shot of warmth at month end.

April had some warmth in the middle but that fizzled near the end and while May started off strong, a cold pattern held steady for the second half of the month.

Precipitation was below seasonal in March, well above average in April and slightly above normal for May.

July 2018 – Record heat!

Five Islands, Colchester County, NS, 24 July 2018 (Dearing)

July was definitely hot and often humid in Greater Moncton with Environment Canada confirming it was the warmest since 1940.

The average daily temperature was 21.4 C which is 2.6 degrees above normal.

An official heat wave in the first week was followed by numerous heat warnings being issued.

The thermometer climbed to 30 C or higher on 11 days during July and never dropped below 18 C during 7 overnights.

Rainfall was more than 30 percent below normal and much of the precipitation fell during thunderstorms.

JULY 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  27.8°C

Average LOW  14.8°C

AVERAGE  21.4°C (about 2.6 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  34.2°C (05 July)

Extreme LOW  8.7°C (13 July)

RAINFALL  63.0 mm (more than 30 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Chris could pose threat

Chris

Atlantic Canada could feel an impact from Tropical Storm Chris which has formed off the coast of the Southeastern U.S.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre says the third named storm of 2018 will move northeastward and possibly strengthen to become a hurricane by early Wednesday.

The storm could weaken as it approaches Nova Scotia by Thursday.

The CHC notes there is still uncertainty in the forecast track and intensity of this system.

Beryl is the second named storm but first hurricane of the season and has been down downgraded to a tropical storm as it heads toward Puerto Rico.

Meantime, Environment Canada issued another heat warning for New Brunswick except the Fundy coast, Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia as a warm, humid air mass pushes highs into the low 30s C with humidex values up to 38 on Monday.

Heat wave ends

rainjuly6

Thundershower as cold front sweeps Greater Moncton, 06 July 2018 (91.9 The Bend)

The passing of a cold front led to showers and thundershowers in Southeast New Brunswick today marking the end of hot, humid weather.

Environment Canada has noted Greater Moncton endured an official heat wave by definition with three straight days of at least 32°C.

The trio of record highs this week:

JULY 3rd : 31.6 C (new), 31.0 C (old record 1984)

JULY 4th : 33.4 C (new), 31.6 C (old record 2013)

JULY 5th : 34.2 C (new), 32.7 C (old record 2013)

The hotspot in New Brunswick on 05 July was a scorching 36.0 C at Miramichi and not far behind was 35.5 C at Kouchibouguac National Park.

As the heat subsides in Eastern Canada, hot weather is building in Western Canada with an impressive record high today of 39.3 C at Val Marie, Saskatchewan.

Heat wave claims lives

A double rainbow after brief rain shower over Moncton, 04 July 2018 (Dearing)

Temperatures across Eastern Canada from Ontario to the Maritimes continued to soar into the 30s C with humidex values above 40.

Authorities in Quebec say at least 18 people have died, all over age 50, as a warm, humid air mass lingered over the province.

Record highs have been recorded in New Brunswick with a new maximum of 31.6 C at the Greater Moncton International Airport on Tuesday (beating 31.0 C from 1984) and 33.4 C today (beating 31.4 C from 1983).

The hotspot in the province was 34.1 C at St. Stephen.