Deep snow cover across N.B.

NB map
This has been a very snowy winter across northern New Brunswick with Edmundston and Bas-Caraquet recording 114 cm of snow on the ground as of today (06 March).

Some unofficial reports have indicated a snow depth of more than 160 cm in some mountainous areas.

Southern New Brunswick also has plenty of snow but often it has been mixed with rain, freezing rain or ice pellets which have lowered accumulations.

Greater Moncton now sits at 53 cm (the most so far this season) and snowbanks are getting high enough to cause visibility issues at some intersections.

Plenty of snow near Caraquet, NB (Village Historique Acadian/IG)

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Heaviest snowfall of 2019

Courtesy NB Highway Cameras, 13 Feb 2019

Lots of rain, freezing rain and ice pellets have been recorded so far this year in Southeast New Brunswick but snow has been somewhat scarce – until today.

A Colorado Low made its way across the continent this week bringing lots of snow to the American Midwest, Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec before arriving in the Maritimes.

Greater Moncton received 26 cm of snow followed by ice pellets and some freezing rain/drizzle along with strong winds which created poor visibility.

Snowfall amounts were fairly consistent across most of Nova Scotia with 22 cm at Greenwood and Halifax Stanfield Airport, 21 cm in Sydney but only 11 cm in Yarmouth.

Environment Canada says cold weather will replace the snow for late week with a brief warmup and rain expected this weekend.

January 2019 – Wet and wild!

Plumweseep

Flooding at Plumweseep Covered Bridge near Sussex, 25 Jan 2019 (Sussex and Area Events/Facebook)

The beginning of 2019 proved to be wild and crazy in New Brunswick.

Precipitation was well above normal for January as storm after storm brought rain, freezing rain, snow and ice pellets with rapidly fluctuating temperatures.

Ice and snow often blocked storm drains which created flooding during heavy rain and when the thermometer plunged, it all froze.

The average monthly temperature was actually about one degree above normal although it didn’t seem like it given the roller coaster of highs and lows.

JANUARY 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH -2.5°C

Average LOW -13.7°C

AVERAGE -8.1°C (about 0.8 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 10.5°C (24 Jan)

Extreme LOW -21.4°C (14 Jan)

RAINFALL 48.9 mm (above 60 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL 101.3 cm (about 30 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Major winter storm approaches

winterstormjan20

Radar image captured at 23hrs, 19 Jan 2019 (Bing maps)


A strong winter storm will track across the Maritimes Sunday bringing a mixed bsg of precipitation to Southeast New Brunswick.

Snow at times heavy will begin in the morning changing to ice pellets and freezing rain by noon and eventually to rain later in the afternoon.

Greater Moncton is expecting about 20 cm snow, 20 mm of rain and possibly several hours of ice accumulation.

Strong winds will develop giving reduced visibility in blowing snow with gusts reaching 80 km/h along the Fundy coast.

Conditions may not improve until Monday afternoon as the storm moves eastward.

Messy mix and a freeze!

Icy conditions at Cap-Pele Harbour, 29 Dec 2018 (Dearing)

A low pressure system from Quebec moved across New Brunswick Friday and into Saturday bringing a mixed bag of precipitation.

Snow began in Greater Moncton by late afternoon which later changed to ice pellets and then freezing rain followed by rain as the temperature climbed above freezing.

After 9 cm snow, 2.5 hours freezing rain and about 7 mm rain, some of the snow melted but by early evening, the thermometer dropped below freezing again which led to ice.

While this may be the last major weather event of 2018, Environment Canada is forecasting another system bringing snow or rain for New Year’s Day.

Early blast of winter

Main Street East webcam, 17 Nov 2018 (City of Moncton)

Southeast New Brunswick received about 20 cm of snow from a Nor’easter giving the region its first taste of winter.

Rain or ice pellets did not mix in as forecast for Greater Moncton but the snow was wet and heavy.

Higher amounts of snow fell further north and lesser amounts along the Fundy coast, Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia where more rain fell.

Snowfall totals (in cm):

  • Kouchibouguac 28
  • Bouctouche 22
  • Greater Moncton 20
  • Miramichi 14
  • Fredericton 13
  • Charlottetown 9
  • Saint John 8
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)
  • U.S. Northeast hit by early season snow

    Snow falling in Washington, DC, USA, 15 Nov 2018 (Instagram)

    A significant November snowstorm took meteorologists by surprise yesterday when more snow fell and for longer than originally forecast.

    A Nor’easter moved up the U.S. Eastern Seaboard dropping 16 cm of snow on New York City which created commuter chaos with train delays and dozens of drivers trapped in their vehicles on treacherous highways.

    While Washington, DC only picked up about 4 cm – the biggest November snowfall in three decades – it was to take road crews by surprise and some schools were closed.

    The precipitation also included ice pellets and freezing rain with an eventual changeover to rain.

    The storm also brought between 10 and 20 cm of snow across Southern Ontario with Toronto Pearson Airport picking up 11 cm.

    The same system is now impacting the Maritimes.

    Nor’easter follows record cold

    Snow settles in NE Moncton before a changeover to rain, 28 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

    A frosty Saturday morning proved record breaking at the Greater Moncton International Airport when the thermometer plunged to -6.6°C which breaks the previous cold low from 1998 by 0.1°C.

    Frigid temperatures were also set in Edmundston at -12.2°C, Woodstock at -11.7°C and Saint John at -8.4°C with weather records going back to 1886.

    The Arctic cold was soon replaced by a low pressure system with some tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa.

    The early season Nor’easter brought snow, ice pellets and eventually rain to the Maritimes along with gusty winds which uprooted trees in parts of New England.

    Icy weekend in Central Canada

    TOicestormApr15

    A tree falls onto an SUV in an ice storm, East York, Toronto, ON, 15 April 2018 (R. Johnston/Toronto Star)

    A slow moving low pressure system brought a wintry mix of snow, ice pellets, freezing rain, rain and strong winds to Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec over the weekend.

    Icy conditions led to more than 1,600 highway crashes, numerous power outages from falling trees and downed lines, cancelled flights, transit delays and school closures.

    Officials were forced to close the CN Tower due to falling ice from the structure.

    Here are some totals from the spring storm as of 16 April at 2pm EDT:

    • Toronto Pearson Airport – 18 hours of ice pellets, 6 hours of freezing rain, 12 cm ice pellets.
    • Toronto Billy Bishop Airport – Peak wind gust of 96km/h
    • London – 14 hours of freezing rain with ice pellets
    • Windsor – 6 hours of freezing rain
    • Hamilton – 11 hours of ice pellets, 6 hours of freezing rain and ice pellets, 8 hours of freezing rain
    • Ottawa – 9 hours of freezing rain Sunday, 6 hours of freezing rain Monday, wind gusts to 70 km/h
    • Montreal – 9 hours of freezing rain Saturday, 4 hours of freezing rain Sunday, 3 hours freezing rain Monday
    • Quebec City – 5 hours of freezing rain Monday

    (Data courtesy Environment Canada)

    Newfoundland nailed!

    CornerBrook

    Heavy snow in Corner Brook, NL, 09 April 2018 (Smallwood/Twitter)

    After delivering a punch to eastern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton, a low pressure system rapidly intensified over Newfoundland with strong winds and heavy snow creating blizzard conditions.

    Snowfall was heaviest in western Newfoundland while the eastern island received freezing rain, ice pellets and rain.

    Snowfall totals as of 9am NDT, 10 April:

    • St. Anthony  42 cm
    • Corner Brook  37 cm
    • Deer Lake  27 cm
    • Gander  18 cm

    Rainfall totals:

    • Cape Race  32 mm
    • St. John’s  24 mm

    Peak wind gusts:

    • Bonavista  126 km/h
    • St. Anthony  120 km/h
    • Gander  119 km/h
    • St. John’s  115 km/h