Early blast of winter

Main Street East webcam, 17 Nov 2018 (City of Moncton)

Southeast New Brunswick received about 20 cm of snow from a Nor’easter giving the region its first taste of winter.

Rain or ice pellets did not mix in as forecast for Greater Moncton but the snow was wet and heavy.

Higher amounts of snow fell further north and lesser amounts along the Fundy coast, Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia where more rain fell.

Snowfall totals (in cm):

  • Kouchibouguac 28
  • Bouctouche 22
  • Greater Moncton 20
  • Miramichi 14
  • Fredericton 13
  • Charlottetown 9
  • Saint John 8
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)
  • Advertisements

    U.S. Northeast hit by early season snow

    Snow falling in Washington, DC, USA, 15 Nov 2018 (Instagram)

    A significant November snowstorm took meteorologists by surprise yesterday when more snow fell and for longer than originally forecast.

    A Nor’easter moved up the U.S. Eastern Seaboard dropping 16 cm of snow on New York City which created commuter chaos with train delays and dozens of drivers trapped in their vehicles on treacherous highways.

    While Washington, DC only picked up about 4 cm – the biggest November snowfall in three decades – it was to take road crews by surprise and some schools were closed.

    The precipitation also included ice pellets and freezing rain with an eventual changeover to rain.

    The storm also brought between 10 and 20 cm of snow across Southern Ontario with Toronto Pearson Airport picking up 11 cm.

    The same system is now impacting the Maritimes.

    Nor’easter follows record cold

    Snow settles in NE Moncton before a changeover to rain, 28 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

    A frosty Saturday morning proved record breaking at the Greater Moncton International Airport when the thermometer plunged to -6.6°C which breaks the previous cold low from 1998 by 0.1°C.

    Frigid temperatures were also set in Edmundston at -12.2°C, Woodstock at -11.7°C and Saint John at -8.4°C with weather records going back to 1886.

    The Arctic cold was soon replaced by a low pressure system with some tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa.

    The early season Nor’easter brought snow, ice pellets and eventually rain to the Maritimes along with gusty winds which uprooted trees in parts of New England.

    Icy weekend in Central Canada

    TOicestormApr15

    A tree falls onto an SUV in an ice storm, East York, Toronto, ON, 15 April 2018 (R. Johnston/Toronto Star)

    A slow moving low pressure system brought a wintry mix of snow, ice pellets, freezing rain, rain and strong winds to Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec over the weekend.

    Icy conditions led to more than 1,600 highway crashes, numerous power outages from falling trees and downed lines, cancelled flights, transit delays and school closures.

    Officials were forced to close the CN Tower due to falling ice from the structure.

    Here are some totals from the spring storm as of 16 April at 2pm EDT:

    • Toronto Pearson Airport – 18 hours of ice pellets, 6 hours of freezing rain, 12 cm ice pellets.
    • Toronto Billy Bishop Airport – Peak wind gust of 96km/h
    • London – 14 hours of freezing rain with ice pellets
    • Windsor – 6 hours of freezing rain
    • Hamilton – 11 hours of ice pellets, 6 hours of freezing rain and ice pellets, 8 hours of freezing rain
    • Ottawa – 9 hours of freezing rain Sunday, 6 hours of freezing rain Monday, wind gusts to 70 km/h
    • Montreal – 9 hours of freezing rain Saturday, 4 hours of freezing rain Sunday, 3 hours freezing rain Monday
    • Quebec City – 5 hours of freezing rain Monday

    (Data courtesy Environment Canada)

    Newfoundland nailed!

    CornerBrook

    Heavy snow in Corner Brook, NL, 09 April 2018 (Smallwood/Twitter)

    After delivering a punch to eastern Nova Scotia and Cape Breton, a low pressure system rapidly intensified over Newfoundland with strong winds and heavy snow creating blizzard conditions.

    Snowfall was heaviest in western Newfoundland while the eastern island received freezing rain, ice pellets and rain.

    Snowfall totals as of 9am NDT, 10 April:

    • St. Anthony  42 cm
    • Corner Brook  37 cm
    • Deer Lake  27 cm
    • Gander  18 cm

    Rainfall totals:

    • Cape Race  32 mm
    • St. John’s  24 mm

    Peak wind gusts:

    • Bonavista  126 km/h
    • St. Anthony  120 km/h
    • Gander  119 km/h
    • St. John’s  115 km/h

    Winter 2017/18 – Riding a Rollercoaster!

    img_0459

    A view of downtown Moncton from city hall, 23 Jan 2018 (City of Moncton)

    Meteorological winter 2017/18 is now in the books since the three month period of December, January and February is over but we all know winter is not over yet in Southeast New Brunswick.

    What a ride it has been in Greater Moncton with temperatures fluctuating wildly from very mild to extremely cold in just hours and in one case in mere minutes.

    Snowfall was lighter compared to normal especially in February but the bigger concern were frequent periods of mixed, icy precipitation such as freezing rain and ice pellets.

    WINTER ALMANAC 2017/18 at the Greater Moncton International Airport

    Average HIGH  -1.2 C (about 0.9 degrees ABOVE normal)

    Average LOW  -11.0 C (about 1 degree ABOVE normal)

    AVERAGE  -6.1 C (about 1 degree ABOVE normal)

    Extreme HIGH  16.7 C (13 January – highest temperature ever recorded in January)

    Extreme LOW  -22.3 C (07 February)

    RAINFALL  134.4 mm (about 20 percent ABOVE normal)

    SNOWFALL  177.8 cm (about 15 percent BELOW normal)

    (Data courtesy Environment Canada)

     

    Another roller coaster ride!

    img_0459

    A view of downtown Moncton from city hall, 23 Jan 2018 (City of Moncton)

    A low pressure system from the west is bringing another mixed bag of precipitation to the Maritimes and once it departs more cold air will filter in behind it.

    Schools were cancelled in New Brunswick today as snow began in the morning followed by a changeover to ice pellets and freezing rain and eventually to rain as the temperature climbed above freezing.

    Flooding is possible again since the partially frozen ground is less able to absorb heavy rainfall.

    Environment Canada issued a freezing rain warning for Greater Moncton but it was dropped later in the day with less than an hour of ice pellets/freezing rain recorded.

    The temperature is expected to reach 10 C by early Wednesday before plunging to -13 C by early Thursday – a difference of 23 degrees in less than a day.

    Flooding then flash freeze

    Coldfront13Jan

    Satellite image taken just before cold front sweeps through Maritimes, 13 Jan 2018 (earth.nullschool.net)

    After a low pressure system brought heavy rain and strong winds gusting up to 74 km/h to Southeast New Brunswick early today, a cold front moved through the region plummeting temperatures below freezing.

    The thermometer in Greater Moncton dropped an incredible 14 degrees in just one hour – from 15 C at 11am to 1 C at noon – and then fell below zero shortly afterward.

    Today’s daytime high of 16.7 C has unofficially broken the 13 January record of 12.2 C from 1972.

    FloodMoncton13Jan

    Floodwaters in Moncton near Wheeler Blvd. and Crowley Farm Rd., 13 Jan 2018 (City of Moncton)

    Flooding was reported in various parts of Greater Moncton and the province was forced to close some roads due to high water levels.

    Before the precipitation ends later tonight, rain will change to freezing rain mixed with ice pellets and then finally to snow.

    Greater Moncton spared worst of storm

    HfxwaterfrontJan5.18

    Powerful storm surge causes flooding along the waterfront in Halifax, NS, 05 Jan 2018 (Twitter)

    The ‘bomb cyclone’ or ‘snow hurricane’ – featuring a dramatic drop in atmospheric pressure when warm and cold air collided – has left the Maritimes and spared Southeast New Brunswick from the worst of its fury.

    While strong winds were a factor throughout the region, Greater Moncton received less snow compared to further north and west.

    To the south and east, more rain fell along with hurricane-force winds (up to 200 km/h gusts in western Cape Breton) which created powerful storm surges causing flooding along the coast.

    Here are some totals from Environment Canada and local estimates:

    • Greater Moncton Airport  14 cm snow, 10 mm rain, 91 km/h wind gust
    • Bathurst  58 cm snow, 80 km/h wind gust
    • Fredericton  30 cm snow, 78 km/h wind gust
    • Saint John  5 cm snow, 20 mm rain, 87 km/h wind gust
    • Halifax Stanfield Airport  40 mm rain, trace snow, 122 km/h wind gust

    The storm may have departed but Arctic air has filtered back into the Maritimes which will mean a bitterly cold weekend.

    Major storm moves across Maritimes

     

    BombCycloneJan18

    “Bomb cyclone” south of the Maritimes, 04 Jan 2017 (earth.nullscholl.net)

    An powerful Nor’easter has arrived in the Maritimes with strong, gusty winds bringing heavy rain for Nova Scotia and a snow/ice pellets/rain for New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

    Winds were hurricane-force in the Halifax region at 117 km/h and thundersnow – a thunderstorm with snow – was recorded in Sydney.

    Storm surge warnings are in place along the Atlantic coast as water levels will be high enough to cause some coastal flooding.

    In Greater Moncton, snow began falling around noon with freezing rain/ice pellets by late afternoon and rain by evening.

    Environment Canada says the storm will move out of the region by Friday afternoon but more frigid air is filtering in behind the system which will mean a very cold weekend.