Warm Thanksgiving weekend

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 08 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

The jet stream brought warm southerly air into the Maritimes allowing temperatures in Southeast New Brunswick to climb into the 20s this Thanksgiving weekend.

Environment Canada says Greater Moncton reached a daytime high of 20.2 C on 07 October, 23.7 C on 08 October (near the record of 23.9 C from 1970), and 22.9 C on 09 October.

Given the autumn warmth, I couldn’t resist a visit to Aboiteau Beach (and neither could a handful of others) which was near 24 C under a mostly cloudy sky and it was quite windy.

Greenwood, Nova Scotia was the hot spot in Canada hitting 26 C for two days in a row.

Advertisements

Early fall heat

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 23 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

This may have been the first weekend of autumn in Southeast New Brunswick but it felt more like the first weekend of summer instead.

Greater Moncton climbed to 27.7 C yesterday (23 September) while today (24 September) it hit 27.9 C and the normal high for late September is 17 C.

High pressure and a northerly jet stream has pushed heat across Eastern Canada with highs in the low 30s C in many parts of Ontario and Southern Quebec.

A heat warning was in place as Toronto Pearson Airport reached a record-breaking 33.1 C yesterday and 33.6 C today.

First snow flurries of the season!

webcamsnow25oct

Courtesy NB Highway Cameras, 25 Oct 2016

The first snow flurries of the season were spotted in Greater Moncton early this morning and snow even covered the ground in northwestern New Brunswick.

The jet stream has dipped south of the Maritimes which has allowed cold air to seep in with below normal temperatures.

The daytime high in Moncton today was only 5.2 C which is below the average maximum of 10 C for late October.

SW Nova Scotia hit by drought

ponddry

Dry pond, Arcadia, Yarmouth Co., NS, 14 Sept 2016 (Comeau/Yarmouth Vanguard)

While it has been dry this summer in parts of New Brunswick, no where has it been drier in the Maritimes than in southwest Nova Scotia.

Meteorologists say while the jet stream normally flows through the middle of the region providing adequate amounts of rain, it was pushed farther north this summer due to the Bermuda High which has been northwest of its usual position.

As a result, rainfall in northern New Brunswick has been above average while southwest Nova Scotia has only received 32 percent of its normal summer precipitation.

For example, Yarmouth had 87 mm of rain during June, July and August which is well below the average of 268 mm.

Emergency management officials say at least 1,000 households have run out of water and bottled water donations from major retailers are being shipped to affected communities.

Cold, clouds linger in Southeast NB

Magnolia

Magnolia tree in bloom, downtown Moncton, 03 May 2016 (Dearing)

Greater Moncton has been enveloped by cloudy skies, cold conditions and frequent showers this week thanks to our close proximity to the jet stream.

While temperatures struggled to reach 6 or 7 C in the southeast, northwestern New Brunswick climbed into the low 20s today.

Forecasters say that warm air will finally push south this weekend with daytime highs near 18 C.

Snow! No! Not at the end of April!

Apr28snow

Dusting of snow sticks to cold surfaces in NE Moncton, 28 April 2016 (Dearing)


After receiving less than half a centimetre of snow this April in Greater Moncton, a dusting of snow fell just two days before month end.

Temperatures have been chilly this week in New Brunswick with a few record lows broken – Moncton was close at -5.5 C on 26 April.

The jet stream has taken a southern dip over Eastern Canada allowing cold Arctic air to sink south.

But forecasters say more seasonal weather is coming as we begin the month of May.

Warmest December ever in New Brunswick

image

About 14 cm of snow in Moncton, 03 Dec 2015 (Choi/Facebook)

Weather records go back to 1881 in New Brunswick and Environment Canada is confirming December 2015 was the warmest ever!

Greater Moncton was 4.4 C above normal, Fredericton was 4.9 C above normal and Saint John was 5.1 C above normal.

The weather office says even 1 C above average is considered significant but 4 to 5 C is almost unheard of and in this case record-breaking.

Forecasters say possible factors were a strong El Nino and a jet stream which consistently veered north of New Brunswick last month allowing for a southwesterly air flow.

Despite the warmth across the province, snowfall totals were actually higher than normal including in Greater Moncton at 96.4 cm (average is 62 cm).

The heat is on in New Brunswick!

tempmapwx_e
It’s now mid-August and I was starting to give up hope we would have a heat wave this summer in New Brunswick.

But low and behold, a Bermuda High and a favourable jet stream pushed the temperature in Greater Moncton to 31.8 Celsius today – the warmest so far in 2015.

The hotspots in the province today were at Bathurst, Fredericton and Kouchibouguac which all reached 33 C.

The heat continues for the next few days in the region.

Environment Canada officially defines a heat wave as three consecutive days with daytime highs of 32 C or higher.

Arctic air plunges southward

tempmapwx_eChange is in the air for New Brunswick and much of Eastern Canada and the United States thanks to a blast of Arctic air as the polar jet stream sinks south.

Environment Canada says temperatures could plunge to -20 C in Greater Moncton by New Year’s Eve and even colder in northern parts of the province which is the coldest air yet this season.

Definitely a different story from recent days with record breaking high temperatures causing the snow cover to disappear across Southern New Brunswick.

Northern fires create poor air quality

Forest fire smoke envelops Yellowknife, NWT, 16 August 2014 (Twitter)

Forest fire smoke envelops Yellowknife, NWT, 16 August 2014 (Twitter)

More than 50 forest fires are currently listed as out of control in the Northwest Territories during what has become a summer of fires.

The blazes have scorched more than three million hectares of land and have created drifting smoke which has meant poor air quality in numerous communities including the capital of Yellowknife.

Smoke from the fires has also been carried southeastward by the jet stream to Ontario, Quebec and the Northeastern United States keeping daytime highs lower than normal.

Commercial fishermen also say the fires have dramatically raised temperatures in rivers and streams leading to a scarcity of fish.