October 2019 – Gradual easing into fall

Centennial Park, Moncton, 14 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Daytime highs were consistently in the mid-teens in Southeast New Brunswick during October which usually sees a sharp drop in temperature as the month progresses.

The average temperature was 0.7°C above normal in Greater Moncton with two days failing to reach 10°C and the warmest maximum on the last day, 19.3°C.

Six days had lows below freezing with some light frost but there was no hard freeze allowing vegetation to flourish.

The precipitation total mostly came from five rainfall events with not a single snowflake recorded.

Fall foliage peaked prior to Thanksgiving weekend and several strong wind events left few leaves on trees by Halloween night.

OCTOBER 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 13.5°C

Average LOW 3.0°C

AVERAGE 8.3°C (about 0.7 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 19.3°C (31 Oct)

Extreme LOW -2.7°C (27 Oct)

RAINFALL 102.7 mm (slightly BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Strong fall storm coming

An intense low pressure system is heading to the Maritimes.

Heavy rain will start during the morning hours in Greater Moncton and strong winds will develop by midday.

Environment Canada says rainfall amounts could reach 50 mm while easterly wind gusts of 70 km/h or higher are likely.

Some trees may be at risk of falling after being weakened by Hurricane Dorian last month.

Many leaves will undoubtedly drop which could plug storm drains causing localized flooding.

September 2019 – Dorian’s fury

Fallen leaves on a trail in Irishtown Nature Park, 23 Sept 2019 (Dearing)

Hurricane Dorian defined September for Southeast New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

Although downgraded before making landfall near Halifax, Dorian was still a very destructive storm.

Powerful winds toppled century-old trees onto power lines, a month’s worth of rain drenched the region in hours and a vicious storm surge tossed boats around like toys.

If it hadn’t been for Dorian, the month would have been quite dry in Greater Moncton.

September also lacked heat with slightly below normal temperatures thanks to chilly nights and cool daytime highs which often struggled to reach 20°C.

SEPTEMBER 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 18.9°C

Average LOW 7.3°C

AVERAGE 13.1°C (about 0.5 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 26.0°C (22 Sept)

Extreme LOW -0.4°C (19 Sept)

RAINFALL 187.5 mm (more than DOUBLE the normal amount)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Fall colours reach peak

Fall foliage along St George Boulevard, Moncton, 13 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

The brilliant fall foliage hues of red, orange and gold have reached their peak in Southeast New Brunswick.

Leaves have already begun falling to the ground and the season is already past peak across the northern part of the province.

Experts say the colours have peaked about a week later than usual thanks to a hot, dry summer which caused stress for leaves.

The drought was relatively short-lived with a plentiful amount of rain recorded so far this autumn.

Fall foliage past peak

Maple tree past peak in Moncton, 22 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

The fall foliage in Southeast New Brunswick is now past peak and the leaves are starting to tumble to the ground.

Typically a strong wind and/or rain event will bring down most remaining leaves from the trees with maples the first to shed and oaks among the last.

Forestry experts say unseasonably warm weather across the Maritimes this autumn have muted some fall colours.

Rich, vivid displays are most common when days are sunny but cool and nights are cold.

Fall foliage past peak in N.B.

fallpastpeak

Fall colours in Centennial Park, Moncton, 16 Oct 2016 (Dearing)

Centennial Park in Moncton was alive with colour yesterday with many people including myself snapping pictures of the amazing fall foliage on display.

But I realized that the fall colours are now past peak with some maple trees almost bare of leaves.

Typically the foliage reaches its colour peak in Southeast New Brunswick by early to mid-October and then the leaves begin to drop.

It’s a beautiful but a sadly short-lived show.

Autumn officially arrives

Spring equinox

Courtesy Accuweather.com

Autumn arrived in New Brunswick at 11:21 AM (Atlantic Time) today.

The autumnal equinox occurs when the sun is directly overhead at the equator and days and nights are about equal in length.

The sun continues to move south of the equator and the amount of daylight decreases until the winter solstice (shortest day of the year) on 21 December.

The leaves are just starting to change colour in Greater Moncton.

Given the dry summer in much of the Maritimes, experts say the fall colours may not be as vibrant and the leaves could drop off earlier than usual.

October 2015 – Mild days, cold nights

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)

Centennial Park, Moncton, NB, 15 October 2015 (Facebook)

Although it seemed relatively warm overall this October in Southeast New Brunswick, stats from Environment Canada show the average monthly temperature was actually below normal.

While daytime highs were mild, especially during the first half of the month, an autumn chill brought overnight lows well below freezing by late October dropping to a near record low of -6.2 C.

The fall foliage may have peaked a bit later this year – due to a dry late summer/early autumn – but strong winds from the remnants of Patricia brought down most leaves on the 29-30 October with gusts up to 82 km/h.

OCTOBER 2015 ALMANAC (at the Greater Moncton International Airport)

Average HIGH  12.2 C

Average LOW  1.6 C

AVERAGE  6.9 C (about 0.7 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 19.6 C (12 Oct)

Extreme LOW -6.2 C (27 Oct)

Rainfall 79 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada, 1981-2010)

Subtle hints of autumn

Sunset at Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, NB, 09 Sept 2015 (Dearing)

Sunset at Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, NB, 09 Sept 2015 (Dearing)


It’s often hard for me to let summer go…

This year is no exception but fortunately warm weather is continuing in Southeast New Brunswick.

If you look around, subtle hints of autumn are starting to appear with some leaves changing colour and a few already drifting to the ground.

Greater Moncton continues to lose daylight at a fast pace during early September – we have lost almost 30 minutes in the past 10 days.

Dandelions are back!

Dandelions in NE Moncton, 16 May 2015 (Dearing)

Dandelions in NE Moncton, 16 May 2015 (Dearing)


They are a bit late this spring but dandelions have finally begun showing their little yellow heads in Southeast New Brunswick.

Although it often takes a while, I am always amazed at how quickly the transition is from winter to spring in Greater Moncton.

Over the past week, lawns have become much greener, trees are sprouting buds and even leaves and numerous seasonal flowers such as tulips and daffodils have made a sudden appearance.

And in five weeks, it will be officially summer!