Powerful Laura pummels U.S. Gulf Coast

Hurricane destruction in Lake Charles, LA, USA, 27 Aug 2020 (Twitter)

Hurricane Laura left a path of destruction and claimed numerous lives, becoming one of the strongest hurricanes to ever strike the United States.

A Category 4 hurricane with drenching rain and winds up to 241 km/h, Laura made landfall in Louisiana near the Texas border early Thursday and even spawned tornadoes before being downgraded to a tropical storm.

Laura destroyed entire neighbourhoods, knocking out electricity to millions but U.S. forecasters noted the hurricane was not as forceful as first thought.

Given the low lying, swampy landscape of the region, ‘unsurvivable’ storm surges had been predicted.

Prior to striking the U.S. Gulf Coast, Laura took at least two dozen lives in Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

‘Potentially Catastrophic’ Laura nears U.S.

Currently churning in the Gulf of Mexico, forecasters describe Laura as an ‘extremely dangerous’ Category 4 hurricane which is packing sustained winds of 230 km/h.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says little time remains to protect life and property before water levels rise and winds become stronger.

Laura is projected to make landfall near the Texas-Louisiana border late Wednesday with an ‘unsurvivable’ storm surge.

More than 600,000 residents have been evacuated which experts say could cause a spike in Covid19 cases amid the pandemic.

Fading tropical storm batters Ontario

Courtesy Weather Nation

The remnants of Tropical Storm Olga were felt across Southern Ontario on the weekend with rainy and windy conditions.

Environment Canada says between 30 and 60 mm of rain fell across the region including the Greater Toronto Area.

Wind gusts were up to 80 km/h in some locations with a peak of 104 km/h recorded at Port Colborne on Lake Erie.

Olga formed in the Gulf of Mexico several days ago and made landfall in Louisiana before quickly churning northward toward the Great Lakes.

Forecasters are calling for more wet weather and cooler conditions by Halloween.

Barry weakens after making landfall

Barry has been downgraded to a tropical depression after making landfall west of New Orleans on Saturday as a Category 1 hurricane.

Although Barry did not bring devastating flooding as some forecasters had originally thought similar to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, parts of Louisiana did receive more than 400 mm of rain which swamped the Mississippi River delta.

Emergency responders rescued at least 90 residents but there were no reports of fatalities.

Remnants of Barry have been moving northward with heavy rain across the American South up to the Midwest.

Louisiana braces for Barry

Barry TWN
Tropical Storm Barry continues churning in the northern Gulf of Mexico with sustained winds of more than 100 km/h.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says Barry is expected to make landfall as a hurricane along the coast of Louisiana on Saturday morning.

The city of New Orleans is on alert for heavy rain (up to 500 mm) and flooding along with storm surges although no evacuations have yet been ordered.

This is the first tropical system to impact the United States in 2019.

After landfall, Barry is expected to weaken and head northward through the Mississippi Valley.

Nate makes U.S. landfall twice

Nate

Canadian Hurricane Centre image, 12PM ADT, 08 Oct 2017 (EC)


After striking land in Louisiana and later in Mississippi early today, Hurricane Nate has weakened to a tropical storm as it heads inland over the Southeastern United States.

Sustained winds of 140 km/h had dropped to 70 km/h after landfall but storm surges caused flooding along the Gulf coast and more than 200 mm of rain could fall in some areas.

Nate originated in the southwestern Caribbean Sea and claimed more than 30 lives in Central America before moving northward.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre has issued a tropical cyclone statement for Southern Ontario with remnants of the storm expected to bring up to 40 mm of rain on Thanksgiving Day.

Harvey finally downgraded

harveyhouston28aug

Floodwaters surround homes and vehicles in east Houston, Texas, USA, 28 Aug 2017 (Reuters)

Tropical Storm Harvey has been downgraded to a tropical depression but not before creating a new weather record in the United States.

Climatologists say Harvey is the worst rainfall event ever with 1318 mm (51.88 inches) of rain recorded at Cedar Bayou, Texas beating the previous mark of 1219 mm (48 inches) in Medina, Texas from Tropical Storm Amelia in 1978.

Thousands of residents could still be stranded and an estimated 40,000 homes have been destroyed by the storm in the Houston area.

Heavy rain is now moving over Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee with some areas expecting more than 200 mm.

Devastating floods in Louisiana

LAflood

Aerial view of flooding near Baton Rouge, LA, USA, 15 Aug 2016 (USDA)

A tropical depression-like low pressure system crawled over the American Gulf Coast states during the last week delivering a deluge to Louisiana.

Already prone to flooding due to its low elevation, some parts of the state were hammered with more than 700 mm of rain in only 48 hours.

More than 40,000 homes have been flooded with thousands forced to evacuate.

The American Red Cross has declared the Louisiana floods the worst U.S. natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

Karen is coming!

Workers board up a hardware store in Pensacola, Florida, USA (AP)

Workers board up a hardware store in Pensacola, Florida, USA, 05 Oct 2013 (AP)

Tropical Storm Karen stalled today as it moved toward the American Gulf Coast but forecasters say it will still bring high winds and heavy rain to an area from Louisiana to Florida.

Voluntary evacuations are in place for low-lying areas of Louisiana and the mayor of New Orleans is expecting flooding and power outages.

Karen was poised to be only the second named storm to make landfall in the United States during an unusually quiet hurricane season.

The first was Tropical Storm Andrea which hit Florida in June and its remnants drenched the Maritimes.

Busy hurricane season predicted

Trees uprooted in St. John's, NL, 11 Sept 2012 (CP photo)

Trees uprooted in St. John’s, NL, 11 Sept 2012 (CP photo)

Forecasters at the Canadian Hurricane Centre say an active hurricane season is expected this year with an above-average number of storms.

One or two storms typically make landfall in Eastern Canada every year with another two or three entering offshore waters.

Although the season officially begins in June, hurricane activity mainly occurs between mid-August and mid-October.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is predicting a 70 percent likelihood of 13 to 20 named storms, of which 7 to 11 could become hurricanes, including 3 to 6 major hurricanes.

In 2012, the Canadian Hurricane Centre monitored five tropical cyclones and issued bulletins on four storms – two which made landfall and two which stayed offshore.

On 11 September, former Hurricane Leslie struck Eastern Newfoundland causing minor damage and on 29-30 October, the far-reaching influence of Post-Tropical Storm Sandy was felt from Ontario to Atlantic Canada.

In the United States, Hurricane Isaac was the only storm to reach landfall as a hurricane in Louisiana and while Hurricane Sandy caused considerable damage in New Jersey and took 147 lives, it lost its status before striking land.