First significant snow coming…

snow coming

An approaching low pressure system could bring the first significant snow of the season to much of New Brunswick this weekend.

Environment Canada has issued a snowfall warning with at least 15 cm and Accuweather is suggesting 8-15 cm could fall in Greater Moncton by Sunday.

Strong northeasterly winds are also in the forecast which may cause higher than normal water levels along the coastlines.

Nova Scotia is expected to receive mostly rain and there is some mixing of rain and snow possible for Southeast New Brunswick.

The same system also brought rare snow to northern Mexico and across the American South.

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Rainfall warning for southern NB

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Heavy rain falls in northeast Moncton, 22 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

A low pressure system from the southwest brought significant rainfall for southern New Brunswick.

Environment Canada issued a rainfall warning with up to 50 mm expected along the Fundy coast, Greater Moncton and the Kennebecasis Valley.

Drivers are being warned about water pooling on roads and flash flooding.

Falling from a daytime high of 13 C to an overnight low of zero, rain could turn to snow with a slight accumulation possible.

First snow of the season!

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Snow falling in west end Moncton, 10 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

A low pressure system moved into New Brunswick today bringing heavy rain accompanied by a vigorous cold front with Arctic air behind it.

As a result, the temperature in Greater Moncton plunged dramatically in just one hour – from a daytime high of 10.3 C at 11am to only 1.8 C by noon.

The thermometer continued to drop below freezing and rain turned to snow before the sky cleared in the late afternoon.

Environment Canada is forecasting a cold but dry weekend with sunshine and temperatures at or slightly above freezing.

Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

Philippe remnants heading to NB

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Tropical Storm Philippe, the 16th named storm and 18th tropical system of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, is no more according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

The storm brought heavy rain to central Cuba and the Bahamas in addition to spawning several tornadoes when it crossed south Florida.

Sustained winds reached 95 km/h with higher gusts reported before Philippe weakened over the western Atlantic.

However, Environment Canada says the remnants are combining with a low pressure system which will bring strong winds and heavy rain to New Brunswick on Monday.

Gert churns up the Atlantic

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Hurricane Gert is not going to pose any threat to land in Atlantic Canada according to the Canadian Hurricane Centre but it will be felt in the sea.

The swell from the Category 1 storm will move into the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia on Wednesday (16 August) and will persist into Thursday.

The swell will produce waves breaking up to three metres along parts of the coast and rip currents are likely.

Forecasters say Gert will not produce any rainfall for the region but the tropical moisture could feed into another low pressure system arriving later this week.

Heavy rain, wind after record highs

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Tree downed in key intersection of downtown Moncton, 09 June 2017 (Wade Perry/Twitter)

A low pressure system moved into the Maritimes today bringing up to 40 mm of rain to Greater Moncton.

A strong thunderstorm also rolled through Southeast New Brunswick in the early evening with wind speeds clocked as high as 102 km/h.

The brief but powerful gusts downed trees and branches onto power lines and caused thousands of power outages.

Environment Canada had not issued any weather warnings for the region.

The storm replaced a warm air mass which set record highs in at least four New Brunswick communities yesterday.

The hotspot was Kouchibouguac National Park which climbed to 32 C and that beats the maximum from 1992.

Moncton and Doaktown both tied their record highs of 30.6 C for the date.

Sunshine and dandelions 

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Dandelions growing in NE Moncton, 13 May 2017 (Dearing)

The dandelions are out in full force as Southeast New Brunswick welcomed a beautiful, sunny day following a cold, grey and rainy week.

The normal high in Greater Moncton for mid-May is 17 C and temperatures didn’t even reach 10 C for two days in a row.

Rainfall has already reached 87 mm and the normal monthly total is 93 mm.

Forecasters are calling for 20-30 mm rain early next week thanks to another low pressure system.

St. John River remains above flood stage

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Flooding along the St. John River, Fredericton, NB, 07 May 2017 (Instagram)

Much of New Brunswick was spared the worst of a low pressure system which delivered heavy rain and created flooding over the weekend especially along the St. John River.

Environment Canada says the extreme southern half of the province had the most rain with more than 100 mm in some areas and unofficially almost 180 mm (about two months worth) fell in Mechanic Settlement, near Fundy National Park.

Moncton got off relatively easy with 40 mm of rain while Saint John had 70 mm and Fredericton reported 80 mm.

The Emergency Measures Organization says water levels should remain high but steady for the rest of this week with more rain on the way.

Military helps in Quebec flood effort

Flooding in Gatineau, Quebec, 06 May 2017 (Instagram)

Days of rainy weather in southern Quebec and eastern Ontario have taken a toll on the region and Canadian soldiers have been asked to help.

High water levels have threatened hundreds of homes and at least 700 residents have been evacuated.

Ile-Bizard, west of Montreal, has been especially hard hit with sand bags helping to keep back rising water in some areas.

In New Brunswick, a low pressure system could bring 50-100 mm of rain to western areas of the province where rivers are already full of water this weekend.