Enough rain already!

Another low pressure system is heading to the Maritimes with two rounds of rain starting early Tuesday stretching into early Wednesday.

Environment Canada says Greater Moncton could receive up to 35 mm of rain but some parts of the region could get 50 mm or more prompting rainfall warnings.

Winds associated with this system will be much lighter compared to the destructive winds over the weekend.

Meantime, NB Power reports about 27,000 customers remain without electricity (at 11pm AST) since restoration efforts began Sunday morning after a weekend rain and wind storm.

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Powerful winds pummel Maritimes

Tree topples over following powerful winds, 04 Nov 2018 (NB Power)

An intense low pressure system moving up from the U.S. Eastern Seaboard brought heavy rain and strong winds to the Maritimes overnight.

The powerful hurricane-force gusts knocked out electricity to more than 100,000 customers in New Brunswick during the height of the storm.

Temperatures were very mild thanks to a southerly flow with highs exceeding 20°C in some areas including a new record of 21.7°C in Cheticamp.

Rainfall amounts (mm):

  • Kejimkujik, NS  93
  • Alma, NB  85
  • Greater Moncton  69
  • Fredericton  64
  • Saint John  60
  • Summerside, PEI  58
  • Halifax Stanfield  45

Wind gusts (km/h):

  • Bouctouche, NB  119
  • North Cape, PEI  117
  • Greater Moncton  110
  • North Mountain, NS  108
  • Grand Etang, NS  106
  • Fredericton  102
  • Saint John  100
  • Halifax Stanfield  100

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Nor’easter follows record cold

Snow settles in NE Moncton before a changeover to rain, 28 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

A frosty Saturday morning proved record breaking at the Greater Moncton International Airport when the thermometer plunged to -6.6°C which breaks the previous cold low from 1998 by 0.1°C.

Frigid temperatures were also set in Edmundston at -12.2°C, Woodstock at -11.7°C and Saint John at -8.4°C with weather records going back to 1886.

The Arctic cold was soon replaced by a low pressure system with some tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa.

The early season Nor’easter brought snow, ice pellets and eventually rain to the Maritimes along with gusty winds which uprooted trees in parts of New England.

First snow flurries of fall!

Snow squall in west end Moncton, 18 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Low clouds and cold gusty winds across the warm Gulf of St. Lawrence and Bay of Fundy produced the first snow flurries of the season throughout the Maritimes today.

Greater Moncton actually had occasional snow squalls throughout the afternoon but there was no accumulation.

Some areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia did record slight amounts on the ground.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement with up to 10 cm of snow possible for the Cape Breton Highlands.

Strong winds across Atlantic Canada

A fast-moving cold front passed through the Maritimes today on its way to Newfoundland.

Powerful winds developed as a result which knocked out electricity to tens of thousands of customers across New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

The Greater Moncton International Airport recorded a gust of almost 90 km/h late this morning with Cape Breton Island reporting winds of more than 100 km/h.

Many locations across Newfoundland had hurricane-force gusts including Bonavista at 126 km/h, Wreckhouse at 107 km/h and St. John’s at 104 km/h.

The cold front also affected Southern Quebec yesterday with gusts of more than 80 km/h in Montreal and Quebec City.

Michael partly to blame for rain

Fall foliage in Centennial Park, Moncton, 13 Oct 2018 ( Dearing)

Starting late Wednesday and lasting into Friday, a warm front and low pressure system eventually combined with moisture streaming northward from Tropical Storm Michael.

As these two systems began to interact, a significant amount of rain fell over parts of the Maritimes.

Rainfall summary in millimetres as of Saturday 5am ADT:

  • Doaktown: 47.2
  • Greater Moncton Airport: 39.4
  • Fredericton: 36.2
  • Saint John: 35.6
  • Grand Manan: 34.5
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport: 55.4
  • Yarmouth: 70.4
  • Kejimkujik: 47.7

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Leslie responsible for rain

Hurricane Leslie, 04 Oct 2018 (U.S. National Hurricane Centre)

Hurricane Leslie is churning well south of the Maritimes and is not forecast to impact the region directly but the storm is indirectly responsible for heavy rain.

The sheer size of the storm – Leslie is more than 1,000 km wide – caused a low pressure system to stall bringing lots of rain to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Here are some totals from the rain event:

  • Greater Moncton. 32.6 mm
  • Saint John. 46.7 mm
  • Charlottetown. 47.2 mm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport. 24.7 mm
  • Yarmouth. 43.2 mm
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)
  • A chilly start!

    It may have been the warmest summer in the Maritimes in almost a century but some parts of the region woke up to below freezing temperatures and frost this morning!

    That means some areas had a growing season which barely lasted 100 days since the last spring frost for many was 04 June.

    Greater Moncton was definitely chilly with an early morning low of 3.0°C which was close to the record low of 1.1°C from 1956.

    Here are some of the nippy overnight lows:

    • Edmundston, NB  -2.0°C
    • Woodstock, NB  -0.8°C
    • Red Pines, NB  -0.7°C
    • Fredericton, NB  0.1°C
    • Upper Stewiacke, NS  -0.4°C
    • Maple Plains, PEI  1.4°C

    B.C. wildfire smoke in the Maritimes!

    The sun becomes an orange ball due to wildfire smoke, SE Calgary, AB, 14 Aug 2018 (Dearing)

    British Columbia is more than 4,000 kilometres away from New Brunswick but that hasn’t stopped forest fire smoke from making its way across Canada.

    On Friday afternoon, Environment Canada issued a special air quality statement: A plume of smoke from fires in Western Canada is moving at high altitude across the Maritimes today causing hazy skies and a reddish sun.

    This smoke is not expected to reach the surface or affect air quality in our region and the plume will move off to the east tonight.

    The British Columbia Wildfire Service says more than 600 fires are burning in the province with many regions still under air quality advisories.

    The heat returns!

    Countryside near Victoria-by-the-Sea, PEI, 23 July 2018 (Dearing)

    Another round of very warm temperatures and high humidity has enveloped almost all of the Maritimes with only New Brunswick’s Fundy coast exempt from an Environment Canada heat warning.

    While actual daytime highs will approach 30 C, humidex values will range between 35 and 40 which can be dangerous for those at risk including young children, seniors and anyone with a chronic illness.

    Forecasters say some relief may come on Thursday with some much needed rain but high humidity could persist until early next week.