Barry weakens after making landfall

Barry has been downgraded to a tropical depression after making landfall west of New Orleans on Saturday as a Category 1 hurricane.

Although Barry did not bring devastating flooding as some forecasters had originally thought similar to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, parts of Louisiana did receive more than 400 mm of rain which swamped the Mississippi River delta.

Emergency responders rescued at least 90 residents but there were no reports of fatalities.

Remnants of Barry have been moving northward with heavy rain across the American South up to the Midwest.

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Extensive weather system arrives in N.B.

radarMar10

Radar image of eastern North America, 10 Mar 2016, 10:30 PM AST (Intellicast)

A low pressure system south of the Great Lakes is tracking eastward and will impact New Brunswick overnight.

Some areas of the province such as Saint John and Fredericton are expecting freezing rain and Environment Canada has posted warnings.

Greater Moncton will receive mostly snow with less than 6 cm expected which falls below warning criteria.

This system is connected to an extensive weather front which has brought torrential rain to the American South – up to 300 mm in the Lower Mississippi River Valley – causing flooding, several deaths and thousands being evacuated from their homes.

Extreme weather closes out 2015

north pole

Image Courtesy CNN

The North Pole climbs above freezing, deadly tornadoes strike Texas, extreme heat bakes Australia and historic floods hit Britain and the American Midwest – the world is filled with extreme weather as it welcomes 2016.

A powerful and destructive North Atlantic low-pressure system brought eastern Canada an unusually warm holiday period, climbing to a spring-like 16°C in Montreal on Christmas Eve.

This was followed by heavy snow from Ontario to the Maritimes.

In the United States, tornadoes and floods left almost 50 dead.

The mighty Mississippi River has already exceeded overflow levels by four metres in some areas.

Scientists say the common cause of these events is a strong El Nino, a weather phenomenon which emerges every few years on average.

Record rainfall has brought unprecedented flooding to England and Scotland and Britain’s mean December temperature was a record-breaking 8°C, smashing the previous high of 6.9°C set in 1934.

With El Nino showing little sign of running out of steam, many scientists say 2016 could be even warmer than 2015.