“Sprinter” continues

Snowflakes falling in NE Moncton, 14 May 2019 (Dearing)

Sprinter is a portmanteau of spring and winter which aptly describes the recent weather in Southeast New Brunswick.

Already mid-May, Environment Canada indicates Greater Moncton is running about three degrees below normal for the month.

Snow mixed in with rain last night and 0.6 cm was recorded at the airport.

Today’s daytime high was 5.3°C and the forecast shows little change for tomorrow.

The Victoria Day long weekend is expected to bring some sunshine but temperatures will remain below seasonable.

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Flooding closes section of TCH

Flooding along the St. John River in Maugerville, 23 April 2019 (5th Canadian Division/Facebook)

For the second year in a row, floodwaters from the St. John River have forced the closure of the Trans Canada Highway between Moncton and Fredericton.

The New Brunswick Department of Transportation says drivers must detour at the Oromocto exit or at the River Glade exit and travel through Saint John.

The detour will add approximately 90 kilometres in each direction.

River Watch officials say water levels in Saint John are expected to reach last year’s historic marks by Friday and while now receding in Fredericton, the water will likely rise again by this weekend.

Winter won’t let go!

Snow in west end Moncton, 09 April 2019 (Dearing)

Real winter weather in New Brunswick started early – back in mid-November – and the relentless season hangs on.

Greater Moncton recorded 7 cm of snow overnight with more than 10 cm in southwestern New Brunswick and western Nova Scotia.

The strong April sun had melted most it by the end of the day.

But another weak system tonight could bring another 4 cm.

Warmer weather is on the way with Environment Canada forecasting highs in the double digits by the weekend.

Hello Spring!

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Magnolia tree in bloom, downtown Moncton, spring 2018 (Dearing)

The spring equinox officially arrived at 6:58pm ADT in the Northern Hemisphere which marks the moment when the Sun is directly above the equator as it moves northward.

The length of days are now roughly equal to the length of nights and the amount of daylight will continue to increase until the first day of summer on June 21st.

To mark the end of astronomical winter, here are a few highlights across Canada from the last three months:

  • Record highs were set in Atlantic Canada just before Christmas with 12.8°C in Greater Moncton on 22 December.
  • Edmonton broke numerous cold records during February with readings as low as -41.2°C and all but four days were in the minus 20’s and 30’s.
  • Snowfall records fell in coastal British Columbia from 10-12 February with 69 cm in Nanaimo and 52 cm in Victoria – more than what is normally received in an entire winter season!

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Winter snowfall across Canada

TWN Snowmap

It has been quite a winter across Canada with no region reporting a shortage of snow.

Snowfall has been especially heavy in the West this season especially coastal British Columbia which usually sees only scant amounts.

Victoria, BC had almost 70 cm of snow in February – more than what typically falls all winter – even higher than snowy Moncton at nearly 60 cm last month.

While many areas of the West have already exceeded their snowfall amounts for an average winter, much of the East is still falling short of a normal season.

The deepest snowpack can be found in northern New Brunswick, central Quebec, Labrador, the Rockies and B.C.’s mountain ranges.

Rain, freezing rain cause flooding

Creek Road near Sussex, NB is washed out by flooding, 25 Jan 2019 (SussexArea/Facebook)

It’s been quite a week for stormy weather in New Brunswick.

The latest system brought heavy rain and a period of freezing rain to the province.

Ice-clogged storm drains caused the water to backup turning streets into rivers in areas such as downtown Moncton.

Municipalities were urging residents to help public works crews by trying to clear drains near their homes.

Mild temperatures contributed to snowmelt and the added rush of water was enough to washout some roads and bridges.

Strong winds along the coast also gusted to more than 100 km/h.

Rainfall amounts (mm):

  • Mechanic Settlement 68
  • Miramichi 61
  • Sussex area 55
  • Kouchibouguac 44
  • Fredericton 34
  • Saint John 25
  • Moncton 13

Risk of frostbite

Hoar frost on trees in west end Moncton, 14 Jan 2019 ( Dearing)

A good old fashioned January cold snap continues in New Brunswick with well below normal temperatures since last weekend.

Wind chill values have dropped to -30 giving the risk of frostbite on exposed skin.

After a frosty -21.4°C in Greater Moncton earlier this week, forecasters say a further tumble to -23°C is likely before a potent winter storm arrives on Sunday.

Environment Canada is tracking a system moving across the U.S. which is expected to bring at least 30 cm of snow, 50 mm of rain, a period of freezing rain and strong winds to the Maritimes.

Say it isn’t snow!

Snow settles on grass, vehicles and rooftops in NE Moncton, 25 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Even by New Brunswick standards, snow in October is not very common.

But a low pressure system dropped more than 15 cm of heavy, wet snow over western and northern parts of the province creating commuter chaos in Fredericton yesterday.

After getting drenched with 38 mm of rain, Greater Moncton received a light coating of snow this morning which stuck to rooftops, vehicles and grassy areas but it melted by midday.

Here are some snowfall totals (in cm) from volunteer observations:

  • Charlo/Belledune area. 23 cm
  • Woodstock. 16 cm
  • Fredericton. 15 cm
  • Miramichi. 13 cm
  • Grand Falls. 10 cm
  • Moncton. 3.4 cm

First snow flurries of fall!

Snow squall in west end Moncton, 18 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Low clouds and cold gusty winds across the warm Gulf of St. Lawrence and Bay of Fundy produced the first snow flurries of the season throughout the Maritimes today.

Greater Moncton actually had occasional snow squalls throughout the afternoon but there was no accumulation.

Some areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia did record slight amounts on the ground.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement with up to 10 cm of snow possible for the Cape Breton Highlands.

Summer to fall in two hours

The skyline of Moncton, NB, 16 Sept 2018 (Dearing)

An abrupt change in temperature thanks to a passing cold front turned summer quickly into fall in Greater Moncton this week.

On Tuesday, Environment Canada reports a temperature of 22°C at 11am which plummeted to 16°C by 1pm and the wind direction changed from the southeast to the northwest.

The long, hot summer in New Brunswick was suddenly over.

The daytime high on Wednesday was 13.6°C which was the coolest day since 25 June.

Forecasters are calling for near or slightly below seasonal temperatures until the end of the month (Normal high 18°C, normal low 7°C).