Microburst in Montreal

MicroburstMTL

Damage from microburst in Notre-Dame-de-Grace, Montreal, QC, 22 Aug 2017 (Instagram)


A sudden and powerful storm which meteorologists call a microburst created a path of damage in Montreal which included the Notre-Dame-de-Grace borough.

Strong, gusty linear winds up to 120 km/h brought down trees and power lines leaving thousands without electricity on Tuesday.

Environment Canada has confirmed a tornado struck Lachute, northwest of Montreal, where winds reached up to 180 km/h.

No one was hurt but hundreds of homes were damaged and some residents have been displaced.

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Military helps in Quebec flood effort

Flooding in Gatineau, Quebec, 06 May 2017 (Instagram)

Days of rainy weather in southern Quebec and eastern Ontario have taken a toll on the region and Canadian soldiers have been asked to help.

High water levels have threatened hundreds of homes and at least 700 residents have been evacuated.

Ile-Bizard, west of Montreal, has been especially hard hit with sand bags helping to keep back rising water in some areas.

In New Brunswick, a low pressure system could bring 50-100 mm of rain to western areas of the province where rivers are already full of water this weekend.

Second major snowstorm of season

secondstormdec16

A low pressure system passed over the Bay of Fundy today bringing the second major snowstorm of the season with at least 20 cm for Southeast New Brunswick.

Schools closed, flights were cancelled at the Greater Moncton International Airport and several car crashes reported as road conditions worsened throughout the day.

Precipitation started as snow in Nova Scotia but later changed to freezing rain and then to rain as temperatures climbed above freezing.

The same Colorado Low impacted Southern Ontario earlier today delivering 15-30 cm snow from Windsor to Ottawa including the Greater Toronto Area and Southern Quebec including Montreal and Quebec City.

Winter storm hits Ontario, Quebec

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Heavy snow in Kingston, ON, 21 Nov 2016 (Twitter)


A Colorado Low brought an early taste of winter to a large swath of Central Canada.

Most of the region saw its first measurable snow of the season with the highest amounts in eastern Ontario (Ottawa 16 cm, Kingston 18 cm) and western Quebec (Mont-Tremblant 15 cm, Montreal 5 cm).

Strong winds were also a factor gusting up to 70 km/h in the Greater Toronto Area and even up to 90 km/h in some areas.

Heavy lake effect snow also pounded neighbouring New York State with up to 50 cm in Rochester and Syracuse.

Extreme weather closes out 2015

north pole

Image Courtesy CNN

The North Pole climbs above freezing, deadly tornadoes strike Texas, extreme heat bakes Australia and historic floods hit Britain and the American Midwest – the world is filled with extreme weather as it welcomes 2016.

A powerful and destructive North Atlantic low-pressure system brought eastern Canada an unusually warm holiday period, climbing to a spring-like 16°C in Montreal on Christmas Eve.

This was followed by heavy snow from Ontario to the Maritimes.

In the United States, tornadoes and floods left almost 50 dead.

The mighty Mississippi River has already exceeded overflow levels by four metres in some areas.

Scientists say the common cause of these events is a strong El Nino, a weather phenomenon which emerges every few years on average.

Record rainfall has brought unprecedented flooding to England and Scotland and Britain’s mean December temperature was a record-breaking 8°C, smashing the previous high of 6.9°C set in 1934.

With El Nino showing little sign of running out of steam, many scientists say 2016 could be even warmer than 2015.

Storm brings blustery conditions

Courtesy The Weather Network

Courtesy The Weather Network

A late autumn storm which brought rain to the Maritimes and the Gaspe and snow to Eastern Ontario and the St. Lawrence Valley also brought strong, gusty winds.

In many parts of New Brunswick, the wind was more of a factor than the precipitation with gusts up to 100 km/h.

Storm totals, courtesy of Environment Canada:

Greater Moncton Airport  12 mm rain, winds 89 km/h

Saint John Airport  90 mm rain, winds 91 km/h

Mechanic Settlement 137 mm rain

Montreal Trudeau Airport 15 cm snow

Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier Airport 25 cm snow

Summer of 2013 so far…

Dickson Falls, Fundy National Park, 21 July 2013 (Dearing)

Dickson Falls, Fundy National Park, 21 July 2013 (Dearing)

We are now about six weeks into the summer of 2013 in Canada and it is time to assess the season to date.

Since astronomical summer began on 21 June, temperatures and precipitation have been generally above normal across the country except for the West Coast where it has been dry and the Prairies where it has been cooler than normal.

Here is a list of major cities across the country and how they compare to normal:

Moncton, NB……+2.1°C above normal temperature and 145% of normal rainfall

Saint John, NB…..+1.9 and 180%

Halifax, NS…….+2.4 and 141%

Charlottetown, PEI…..+1.0 and 91%

St. John’s, NL…..+1.5 and 118%

Montreal, QC…..+2.0 and 122%

Ottawa, ON…..+1.0 and 118%

Toronto, ON…….+2.3 and 284%

Winnipeg, MB……+0.4 and 112%

Regina, SK…..-0.1 and 43%

Edmonton, AB…..-0.1 and 103%

Calgary, AB……+0.5 and 76%

Vancouver, BC…..+1.5 and 71%

Whitehorse, YT…..+2.2 and 162%

Yellowknife, NT…..+1.9 and 42%

(Data courtesy Accuweather.com)

Second major storm of the season

A wintry downtown Moncton, 27 Dec 2012 (TWN)

A wintry downtown Moncton, 27 Dec 2012 (TWN)

Greater Moncton was walloped with 29.2 cm of heavy,wet snow overnight along with freezing rain and rain.

The storm also dropped 38 cm on Gagetown, 25 cm in Kouchibouguac and 22 cm in Fredericton.

Rain fell mainly along the Fundy and Atlantic coasts with 34 mm  reported on Grand Manan Island.

The same storm system buried Montreal under 45 cm of snow – a single day snow record.

Meantime, Environment Canada is tracking another system which could bring more snow and high winds to Nova Scotia and New Brunswick on Sunday.

Winter storm wallops Eastern Canada

27-28 Dec 2012 (courtesy Accuweather.com)

27-28 Dec 2012 (courtesy Accuweather.com)

For many in Southern Ontario, this wintry wallop was the first major snowstorm of the season dumping about 15 cm of snow on Windsor, Toronto and Hamilton with 20 cm in Ottawa and 30 cm in Kingston.

Montreal could receive as much as 40 cm of snow while Quebec City can expect about 20 cm.

The storm actually originated in the American South dropping rare post-Christmas snow on cities like Dallas, Texas and Little Rock, Arkansas.

After hammering the U.S. Northeast with snow and rain, the storm is now moving into New Brunswick and Nova Scotia with snow, strong gusty winds and rain along the Atlantic coast.

Canada’s Top 10 Weather Stories for 2012

Flooding on Robie Street, Truro, NS, 10 September 2012 (Courtesy Facebook)

Flooding on Robie Street, Truro, NS, 10 September 2012 (Courtesy Facebook)

In its annual list, Environment Canada has chosen the top weather stories of the year – from super storms to super heat, and from immense flooding to immense fires.

1. BIG HEAT
Temperatures were above normal across Canada during winter, spring and summer from coast to coast to coast.

2. ACTIVE HURRICANE SEASON
By the end of the Atlantic hurricane season, 19 named storms were recorded with Chris, Leslie, Rafael and Sandy impacting Canada.

3. BRITISH COLUMBIA FLOODING
High levels of early spring flooding in British Columbia caused washouts, and slides, evacuations and fatalities.

4. MARCH MILDNESS
The March heat wave was off the scale in every way: intense, huge and long-lasting. In Moncton, a new record monthly high of 26 C was recorded.

5. WILD PRAIRIE SUMMER
Summer on the Prairies started out with short-lived cool temperatures and ended as one of the top ten warmest on record.

6. BIG MELT
The year will go down as one of extraordinary change across the Arctic Ocean, with sea ice becoming dramatically thinner, weaker and younger and melting more easily.

7. HIGH AND DRY IN THE EAST
Higher than normal temperatures and a lack of rainfall in Eastern Canada meant a great summer for most outdoor enthusiasts but trouble for some crops and water systems.

8. URBAN FLOODING
Thunder Bay experienced record breaking flooding in May while Montreal and Toronto also found themselves with expensive floods weeks later.

9. CALGARY HAILSTORM
A monstrous hailstorm pelted Calgary with hailstones larger than golf balls on August 12th and in a matter of 10 minutes, pounding hail dimpled vehicles and riddled house siding with millions of dents.

10. SAINT JOHN RIVER ICE-JAM FLOODING
The first days of spring were marked by a mandatory evacuation for residents of Perth-Andover and Tobique First Nation when the Saint John River and several tributaries spilled onto nearby fields and roads.