Here comes the rain (and snow) again…

Snow settles in NE Moncton before changeover to rain, 10 Nov 2018 (Dearing)

Without a doubt, it has been a soggy couple of months in Greater Moncton.

More 100 mm of rain – almost a month’s worth – has fallen during the first week of November alone and precipitation was 50 percent above normal in October.

Another low pressure system arrived in the Maritimes this weekend with a mix of rain and snow in New Brunswick.

Several centimetres of snow fell in Greater Moncton and after a changeover to rain as much as 30 mm could fall before it ends later today.

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Powerful winds pummel Maritimes

Tree topples over following powerful winds, 04 Nov 2018 (NB Power)

An intense low pressure system moving up from the U.S. Eastern Seaboard brought heavy rain and strong winds to the Maritimes overnight.

The powerful hurricane-force gusts knocked out electricity to more than 100,000 customers in New Brunswick during the height of the storm.

Temperatures were very mild thanks to a southerly flow with highs exceeding 20°C in some areas including a new record of 21.7°C in Cheticamp.

Rainfall amounts (mm):

  • Kejimkujik, NS  93
  • Alma, NB  85
  • Greater Moncton  69
  • Fredericton  64
  • Saint John  60
  • Summerside, PEI  58
  • Halifax Stanfield  45

Wind gusts (km/h):

  • Bouctouche, NB  119
  • North Cape, PEI  117
  • Greater Moncton  110
  • North Mountain, NS  108
  • Grand Etang, NS  106
  • Fredericton  102
  • Saint John  100
  • Halifax Stanfield  100

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

October 2018 – Cool and wet

View from the Sussex Bluffs, Sussex Corner, NB, 14 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

October 2018 proved to be very different from October 2017 in Southeast New Brunswick.

While it was warm and dry last year in Greater Moncton (the second warmest October since 1881), it was the opposite this year – cool and wet.

Temperatures were below normal with only one day reaching 20°C and a hard frost arrived by mid-month.

Only seven days were dry with three major rainfall events and snow fell on three days – briefly settling on the ground twice.

OCTOBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 10.5°C

Average LOW 2.2°C

AVERAGE 6.4°C (about 1.2 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 19.6°C (04 Oct)

Extreme LOW -6.6°C (27 Oct)

RAINFALL 150 mm (estimate; about 40 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL 6.2 cm (well ABOVE the normal of 1.2 cm)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Say it isn’t snow!

Snow settles on grass, vehicles and rooftops in NE Moncton, 25 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Even by New Brunswick standards, snow in October is not very common.

But a low pressure system dropped more than 15 cm of heavy, wet snow over western and northern parts of the province creating commuter chaos in Fredericton yesterday.

After getting drenched with 38 mm of rain, Greater Moncton received a light coating of snow this morning which stuck to rooftops, vehicles and grassy areas but it melted by midday.

Here are some snowfall totals (in cm) from volunteer observations:

  • Charlo/Belledune area. 23 cm
  • Woodstock. 16 cm
  • Fredericton. 15 cm
  • Miramichi. 13 cm
  • Grand Falls. 10 cm
  • Moncton. 3.4 cm

Early season snow in N.B.

Radar image of New Brunswick, 17 hrs, 23 Oct 2018 (Intellicast)

Snow has come early for parts of northern and western New Brunswick as a low pressure system brings heavy rain elsewhere in the province.

Fredericton recorded a few centimetres of snow today while Greater Moncton is expecting mostly rain – possibly 15 to 25 mm – starting tonight.

Environment Canada says up to 15 cm of snow could fall by Wednesday night in the north and west with greater amounts over high terrain.

First snow flurries of fall!

Snow squall in west end Moncton, 18 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

Low clouds and cold gusty winds across the warm Gulf of St. Lawrence and Bay of Fundy produced the first snow flurries of the season throughout the Maritimes today.

Greater Moncton actually had occasional snow squalls throughout the afternoon but there was no accumulation.

Some areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia did record slight amounts on the ground.

Environment Canada issued a special weather statement with up to 10 cm of snow possible for the Cape Breton Highlands.

Strong winds across Atlantic Canada

A fast-moving cold front passed through the Maritimes today on its way to Newfoundland.

Powerful winds developed as a result which knocked out electricity to tens of thousands of customers across New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.

The Greater Moncton International Airport recorded a gust of almost 90 km/h late this morning with Cape Breton Island reporting winds of more than 100 km/h.

Many locations across Newfoundland had hurricane-force gusts including Bonavista at 126 km/h, Wreckhouse at 107 km/h and St. John’s at 104 km/h.

The cold front also affected Southern Quebec yesterday with gusts of more than 80 km/h in Montreal and Quebec City.

Fall colours reach peak

Fall foliage along St George Boulevard, Moncton, 13 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

The brilliant fall foliage hues of red, orange and gold have reached their peak in Southeast New Brunswick.

Leaves have already begun falling to the ground and the season is already past peak across the northern part of the province.

Experts say the colours have peaked about a week later than usual thanks to a hot, dry summer which caused stress for leaves.

The drought was relatively short-lived with a plentiful amount of rain recorded so far this autumn.

Michael partly to blame for rain

Fall foliage in Centennial Park, Moncton, 13 Oct 2018 ( Dearing)

Starting late Wednesday and lasting into Friday, a warm front and low pressure system eventually combined with moisture streaming northward from Tropical Storm Michael.

As these two systems began to interact, a significant amount of rain fell over parts of the Maritimes.

Rainfall summary in millimetres as of Saturday 5am ADT:

  • Doaktown: 47.2
  • Greater Moncton Airport: 39.4
  • Fredericton: 36.2
  • Saint John: 35.6
  • Grand Manan: 34.5
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport: 55.4
  • Yarmouth: 70.4
  • Kejimkujik: 47.7

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Leslie responsible for rain

Hurricane Leslie, 04 Oct 2018 (U.S. National Hurricane Centre)

Hurricane Leslie is churning well south of the Maritimes and is not forecast to impact the region directly but the storm is indirectly responsible for heavy rain.

The sheer size of the storm – Leslie is more than 1,000 km wide – caused a low pressure system to stall bringing lots of rain to Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Here are some totals from the rain event:

  • Greater Moncton. 32.6 mm
  • Saint John. 46.7 mm
  • Charlottetown. 47.2 mm
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport. 24.7 mm
  • Yarmouth. 43.2 mm
  • (Data courtesy Environment Canada)