Fall colours reach peak

FallOct9.17

Centennial Park (top) and Irishtown Nature Park (bottom), Moncton, 09 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

Mother Nature is putting on a great show this autumn with brilliant hues of red, yellow and orange throughout Southeast New Brunswick. 

The tourism department says fall colours have reached their peak across northern New Brunswick and are near peak in the rest of the province. 

On Thanksgiving Monday, I had a chance to capture images of the amazing fall foliage in Greater Moncton at Centennial Park and Irishtown Nature Park. 

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Warm Thanksgiving weekend

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 08 Oct 2017 (Dearing)

The jet stream brought warm southerly air into the Maritimes allowing temperatures in Southeast New Brunswick to climb into the 20s this Thanksgiving weekend.

Environment Canada says Greater Moncton reached a daytime high of 20.2 C on 07 October, 23.7 C on 08 October (near the record of 23.9 C from 1970), and 22.9 C on 09 October.

Given the autumn warmth, I couldn’t resist a visit to Aboiteau Beach (and neither could a handful of others) which was near 24 C under a mostly cloudy sky and it was quite windy.

Greenwood, Nova Scotia was the hot spot in Canada hitting 26 C for two days in a row.

Warmest high of 2017

Sunflowers flourishing during heat wave, Salisbury, NB, 24 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

Having a heat wave in late September is unusual for Southeast New Brunswick but even more so is that the highest temperature of 2017 has occurred in early autumn.

The thermometer soared to 31.1 C yesterday (26 September) at the Greater Moncton International Airport which breaks the previous maximum of 29.6 C from 2007 and records date back to 1881.

The previous high for the year had been 30.6 C recorded on 04 August.

At least 10 other New Brunswick communities set new record highs yesterday including Fredericton at 32.8 C, Woodstock at 32.3 C and Bouctouche at 31.8 C.

Environment Canada says temperatures will return to more seasonable values by the weekend with highs between 16 and 18 C.

Autumn officially arrives

Hints of fall in Bessborough Park, Moncton, NB (Dearing)

The autumnal equinox arrived in New Brunswick at 5:02pm ADT.

Days and nights are now roughly equal in length and the sun is directly overhead at the equator and will head southward.

The leaves in Greater Moncton are starting to show hints of fall colours and experts say a dry summer could mean the display will not be as brilliant.

The Weather Network is forecasting a warmer and wetter autumn season compared to normal.

N.B. halts forestry operations amid extreme dryness

Tinder dry grass in west end Moncton, 03 Aug 2017 (Dearing)

Provincial officials say the fire hazard in New Brunswick is at its highest level in over 20 years.

A fire ban has been in place for days which means campers have to find other ways to roast marshmallows.

The province took a rare step today by restricting forestry operations during peak daytime hours.

Southeast New Brunswick currently has an extreme fire hazard and Greater Moncton has not recorded any significant rain since 21 July.

Unusual mid-summer cool snap

Sunset at Parlee Beach, NB, 18 July 2017 (Dearing)


Late July is typically the warmest period of summer in Greater Moncton but a recent cool down has brought September-like days and a record overnight low. 

On 23 July, the temperature fell to 6.9 C at the Greater Moncton International Airport which broke a record low of 7.2 C from 1962. 

A frost advisory was posted in northwest New Brunswick with a chilly low of 2.4 C in Edmundston. 

The short term forecast calls for more seasonal highs in the mid-20’s C and lows near 13 C. 

Heat wave abruptly ends in N.B.

Heavy rain during thunderstorm in NE Moncton, 21 July 2017 (Dearing)


The temperature climbed to 30 C for three days in a row in Greater Moncton which is an unofficial heat wave since 32 C is the maximum by definition.

Those warm daytime highs, 30.4 C (19 July), 30.4 C (20 July) and 30.0 C (21 July), still haven’t eclipsed the season-to-date maximum of 30.8 C recorded on 11 June.

A cold front moved west to east through New Brunswick yesterday triggering scattered thunderstorms with heavy rain, gusty winds and even hail.

The heat and humidity have been replaced by a cooler, drier air mass with highs in the low 20’s C which is slightly below normal for late July.

Firefighters make progress in B.C. wildfires

BCwildfiresjuly13

Active wildfires burning in BC, 13 July 2017 (BC Wildfire Service/Google)

More than 300 firefighters from across Canada including New Brunswick are now in British Columbia to relieve those already on the ground battling over 180 wildfires.

Some progress has been made thanks to recent cooler weather but 14,000 residents have been evacuated and thousands more are on alert to leave their homes at short notice.

Forecasters say gusty winds expected this weekend could fan the flames even further and the heat is also expected to return.

The economy of the B.C. Interior is taking a hit this summer with many campgrounds and provincial parks forced to close due to the wildfires and related road closures.

Severe weather in northern N.B.

PlasterRock

Heavy rain, hail and wind, Plaster Rock, NB, 27 June 2017 (Greg LeBel/Facebook)

An unstable air mass moved from west to east in New Brunswick producing severe thunderstorms bringing torrential rain, large hail and strong winds.

Environment Canada believes a severe thunderstorm formed near Doaktown and possibly spawned a tornado that moved into the Blackville area last night.

Golf ball size hail and damaging winds with gusts up to 100 km/h were recorded in the Plaster Rock area.

Southeast New Brunswick has seen an above average 18 days with thunderstorm activity this June and a severe thunderstorm watch was issued in the region this afternoon.

Heat comes to abrupt end

Thunderstorm moves into Saint John, 12 June 2017 (AKS/Twitter)


After three days of daytime highs above 28 C in Greater Moncton, much cooler weather is coming thanks to a cold front and a change in wind direction. 

The warm sometimes unstable air mass has created severe thunderstorms across the region.

Flash flooding was reported in Saint John yesterday after heavy downpours with wind and hail which were also observed today in northeastern Nova Scotia. 

Environment Canada is forecasting below seasonal temperatures for Southeast New Brunswick over the next couple of days.