Dorian packs powerful punch

Dorian damage in Halifax’s West End, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Hurricane Dorian has left a path of destruction across the Maritime Provinces despite being downgraded as it crossed the region.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre says Dorian was an intense post-tropical storm as it made landfall at 7:15pm ADT Saturday in Sambro, 25 km southwest of Halifax.

Dorian brought destructive winds, flooding rains and powerful storm surges to much of Nova Scotia, southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

A construction crane collapsed and century old trees toppled onto homes, businesses, vehicles and streets in Halifax.

Public works staff are scrambling to clean up the mess and power crews are trying to restore electricity to the tens of thousands without it.

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Crews clean up storm damage in Halifax’s west end, 08 Sept 2019 (NS Power)

Rainfall totals (mm) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Oxford, NS. 138
  • Halifax (Lower Sackville), NS. 138
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 121
  • Miramichi, NB. 115
  • Kentville, NS. 110
  • Summerside, PEI. 90
  • Saint John, NB. 82
  • Fredericton, NB. 75

Peak wind gusts (km/h) as of 11am ADT Sunday:

  • Beaver Island (eastern shore), NS. 145
  • Yarmouth, NS. 130
  • North Cape, PEI. 122
  • Halifax (city), NS. 120
  • Miscou Island, NB. 106
  • Sydney, NS. 104
  • Saint John, NB. 102
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB. 100

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

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Hurricane Dorian landfall expected near Halifax

Dorian update

Emergency measures organizations in the Maritimes have been preparing for Hurricane Dorian which is approaching southwestern Nova Scotia with maximum winds of 148 km/h (as of 12pm ADT).

The Canadian Hurricane Centre expects Dorian will make landfall near Halifax on Saturday evening as a Category 1 hurricane.

Residents who live along the Atlantic coast, such as Peggys Cove for example, are being urged to evacuate and move inland.

Long lines were reported at stores and gas stations on Friday as residents scrambled to stock up on food and other supplies.

Hurricane warnings and tropical storm warnings have been issued for all of Nova Scotia including Cape Breton Island, Prince Edward Island and southeast New Brunswick.

Strong winds gusting up to 120 km/h are in the forecast, rainfall amounts could exceed 100 mm and large waves and storm surges are likely along coastlines.

As of 2pm ADT, about 75,000 customers were without electricity in Nova Scotia with some trees toppled over along the province’s south shore.

Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick (warnings as of 2pm ADT)

  • Tropical Storm Warning – heavy rain, strong winds, storm surges along the coast
  • Wind Warning – gusts up to 90 km/h which could cause damage, uproot trees
  • Rainfall Warning – 50 to 100 mm rain (a month’s worth) could cause flooding

Erin drenches Maritimes

Post-tropical depression Erin interacted with an incoming low pressure system to produce lots of rain in the Maritimes.

Environment Canada says the heaviest amounts were recorded in northern Nova Scotia and the Annapolis Valley – Parrsboro and Greenwood each had more rain from this storm than all of July and August combined.

Some roads were damaged and even washed out by surface runoff or flooding.

Erin’s direct path along Nova Scotia’s south shore produced wind gusts up to 80 km/h.

The storm brought tropical air with a high of 23°C in Greater Moncton on Friday but a humidex of 32.

Rainfall totals (mm):

  • Parrsboro 162
  • Greenwood 127
  • Kentville 115
  • Summerside 67
  • Fredericton 56
  • Moncton 50
  • Halifax (city) 48

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Quiet forest fire season in N.B.

Forest Fire

Forest fire near River Glade, NB, 07 May 2013 (Dearing)

A wet, cold spring and a dry, humid July have led to one of the quietest forest fire seasons in recent memory in New Brunswick.

Statistics show 152 fires for the season to date which compares to 206 fires over the past ten years.

Last year was also much busier with 242 fires recorded by the middle of August.

Provincial wildfire officials say although July was warmer than normal, high humidity levels helped prevent fires from starting and from spreading.

Stormy Saturday in Maritimes

Ominous sky over Moncton, 10 Aug 2019 (B. Smith-Peterson/Facebook)

A line of strong thunderstorms moved across New Brunswick, western Prince Edward Island and eastern Nova Scotia on Saturday bringing heavy downpours, hail and strong winds.

Greater Moncton was under a severe thunderstorm warning for a few hours with hail about 1 cm in diameter being reported outside the city.

Heavy rain also caused flash flooding in downtown Shediac with social media posts showing vehicles making their way through water clogged streets.

Temperatures also plunged from the low 20s to the mid-teens as the storms passed.

Although the rain is needed, concert goers might disagree with the first show being staged on Magnetic Hill today in four years.

Severe weather moves across N.B.

Dark clouds northwest of Moncton, 31 July 2019 (Dearing)

A line of severe thunderstorms slid through New Brunswick tonight producing heavy rain, hail and strong, gusty winds up to 100 km/h.

Small funnel clouds were noticed but no reports of tornadoes.

Environment Canada issued watches and warnings for many parts of the province including Greater Moncton.

The ridge of storm clouds passed to the northwest of the city and not a single drop of rain fell but it did drop temperatures enough to end the heat warning.

Heat building in the Maritimes

Beach

A fine day at Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 27 July 2019 (Dearing)

A heat warning has been in place since the start of the weekend in much of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia (except for Cape Breton) and Prince Edward Island.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 30 C on Saturday and 29 C today but the forecast calls for 30 C on Monday and 31 C for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Overnight lows are not expected to drop that much either hovering around 18 to 19 C.

While humidity has been relatively low this weekend at around 50 percent or less, Environment Canada says the warm air mass will become more humid this week.

The only relief will be along the Fundy coast where temperatures will stay in the low 20s.

Hottest weather yet?

Saint John River at Perth-Andover, NB, 16 July 2019 (Dearing)

The next heat wave across Eastern Canada could be the warmest period yet this summer with daytime highs in the low 30’s C and humidex values near 40.

Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec have been blanketed with heat warnings from Environment Canada with hot, humid days and warm nights expected this weekend.

Temperatures in the Maritimes for Saturday and Sunday could reach 30 C but a cold front will bring cooler and drier air by Monday.

A mini heat wave already brought highs of 29 C and 30 C earlier this week in Greater Moncton.

Brief heat wave ends

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 04 July 2019 (Dearing)

In less than two hours, the temperature in Greater Moncton dropped from 31.1°C to 24.0°C late this afternoon – a difference of seven degrees.

A cold front moved through New Brunswick with thunderstorms marking an abrupt end to the summer’s first brief heat wave.

Environment Canada even issued a tornado warning for the Grand Lake area after a possible twister developed south of Boiestown.

The warning was lifted after 30 minutes and no damage or injuries were reported.

Record highs have been broken in a number of communities across the Maritimes.

Friday, 05 July:

  • Kouchibouguac NP, new record 31.1°C, old record 33.9°C from 1939
  • Grand Manan, new record 31.7°C, old record 30.0°C from 1999
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, 32.7°C, old record 31.4°C from 2013

Greater Moncton was within a hair of breaking a record Saturday and Sunday it was the warmest on that date since 2013.

  • 05 July, high 34.0°C, record 34.2°C from 2018
  • 06 July, high 31.4°C, record 35.0°C from 1911

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Here comes the heat!

The view from Economy Point, NS, 03 July 2019 (Dearing)

After a cool and wet start to summer, a blast of heat is heading to the Maritime Provinces over the next few days.

Environment Canada has issued heat warnings for most of New Brunswick – excluding the Fundy coast – and western Nova Scotia while other areas under a special weather statement.

A warm, humid air mass is moving into the region today raising daytime temperatures to 30°C or more.

Humidex values near 40 are expected and overnight lows may not fall below 18°C providing little relief from the heat.

Near normal values will return late Saturday as a cold front arrives.

Heat warnings are also in place for parts of Ontario and Quebec where it climbed into the low 30s yesterday.