Early snow for southern Ontario & Quebec

A snowy Gore Park, Hamilton, ON, 11 Nov 2019 (City of Hamilton)

An early winter storm tracked south of the Great Lakes on Monday and brought snow to Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec.

Snowfall amounts generally ranged between 10 and 30 cm.

Environment Canada says Toronto marked its earliest major snowfall on record with about 15 cm.

Arctic air has filtered in behind the storm prompting the city to issue an extreme cold weather alert with a possible overnight low of -15°C.

Snowfall amounts (cm), Tuesday 5pm EST:

  • Montreal 20
  • Quebec City 20
  • Windsor 19
  • Hamilton 17
  • Toronto (downtown) 15
  • Ottawa 13

Windy start to November

Tree leaning on power lines, 01 Nov 2019 (NB Power)

Blustery but mild weather on Halloween continued throughout the first day of November in Southeast New Brunswick.

A cold front created strong winds with a sustained high of 64 km/h and a peak gust of 94 km/h at the Greater Moncton Airport.

Many trees and branches – already weakened by Dorian earlier this fall – came down onto power lines with NB Power dealing with almost 60,000 customers without electricity by late Friday.

Environment Canada warned of gusts up to 110 km/h in the Tantramar Marsh which forced the shutdown of the Trans Canada Highway between Amherst and Sackville until winds subsided.

The daytime high on 01 November was 19.4°C which was slightly warmer than the October maximum of 19.3°C.

The same storm system also hit Quebec where more than one million customers lost power, one man was killed by a falling tree and a canopy collapsed at a service station.

Hurricane season begins

2018 hurricanes

Today marks the beginning of the 2019 hurricane season which will run until the end of November.

For a record fifth consecutive year, storm activity began before the 01 June official start date when Subtropical Storm Andrea formed on 20 May.

The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is forecasting a near normal season with 9–15 named systems, 4–8 hurricanes, and 2–4 major hurricanes.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre begins issuing statements when a storm is within three days of entering a response zone covering Eastern Canada and adjacent waters.

Winter won’t let go!

Snow in west end Moncton, 09 April 2019 (Dearing)

Real winter weather in New Brunswick started early – back in mid-November – and the relentless season hangs on.

Greater Moncton recorded 7 cm of snow overnight with more than 10 cm in southwestern New Brunswick and western Nova Scotia.

The strong April sun had melted most it by the end of the day.

But another weak system tonight could bring another 4 cm.

Warmer weather is on the way with Environment Canada forecasting highs in the double digits by the weekend.

Warmest since early November!

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The last day of March proved to be the warmest day in Greater Moncton since 03 November when the thermometer hit 17.1 C.

The daytime high reached a balmy 16.8 C and the New Brunswick hot spot was 19 C in Sussex which brought residents outdoors to walk, run, hike and play.

The maximum was actually close to the record for the date which was 17.5 C from 2006.

But a passing cold front will drop the temperature considerably overnight as rain changes to snow and Monday’s high struggles to reach slightly above freezing.

Is spring around the corner?

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The Weather Network has unveiled its spring 2019 forecast covering March, April and May – so what can New Brunswick expect?

It’s been a long, cold and stormy winter which began in mid-November but TWN believes after another cold wave in early March, a warmer pattern will develop later in the month.

Meteorologist Michael Carter says more consistent spring-like weather is possible by early April.

Both temperatures and precipitation are expected to be near normal for the season.

Carter adds flooding is a possibility given normal spring run-off combined with any rain or snow that falls.

But he thinks it won’t be as stormy this spring compared to past years.

December 2018 – Cold & dry

Sun glistening on the ice of Shediac Bay, 30 Dec 2018 (Dearing)

December turned out to be another cold month in Greater Moncton continuing a trend which began in October.

An early Arctic air mass kept daytime highs below freezing for a lengthy ten day stretch.

The month did prove to be less stormier than November with below normal rainfall and snowfall.

While Southeast New Brunswick had a snow cover for a few weeks prior to Christmas, it had mostly disappeared by 25 December.

DECEMBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH -1.6°C

Average LOW -10.2°C

AVERAGE -5.9°C (about 1.1 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 12.8°C (22 Dec)

Extreme LOW -16.5°C (09 Dec)

RAINFALL 46.8 mm (slightly BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 34.7 cm (about 40 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Autumn 2018 in review

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Meteorological autumn spanning the months of September, October and November proved to be cooler and much wetter than normal in Greater Moncton.

While September felt more summer-like, it turned decidedly colder by mid-October and a big drop by mid-November with a low within two degrees of a 30-year record.

Precipitation was heavy with more than 100 mm of rain falling above normal and snow first appeared in late October and again in heavy amounts by late November.

November 2018 – Cold & snowy

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Snow settles in NE Moncton before changeover to rain, 10 Nov 2018 (Dearing)

About twice the normal amount of precipitation fell in Southeast New Brunswick during November which began as heavy rain and became heavy snow when it turned colder.

Two major rain events which included hurricane force winds were followed by the first snowfall of the season on the 10th and three more snow events to round out the month.

Greater Moncton had snow cover starting on the 14th and by the 30th, about 31 cm of snow was lying on the ground – almost eight times more than normal.

Temperatures were mild during the first third of the month and became decidedly frigid by the middle with lows near -15 C accompanied by bitterly cold wind chills.

NOVEMBER 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 3.2°C

Average LOW -4.0°C

AVERAGE -0.4°C (about 2.3 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 17.1°C (03 Nov)

Extreme LOW -15.3°C (22 Nov)

RAINFALL 141.4 mm (about 50 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL 75.0 cm (about 4 times ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Back-to-back systems batter N.B.

Freshly fallen snow in west end Moncton, 29 Nov 2018 (Dearing)

Southeast New Brunswick has been under a gloomy, grey sky all week thanks to a couple of low pressure systems.

The first one brought rain, drizzle and fog while the second brought heavy, wet snow to make this November one of the snowiest in recent memory.

Eastern New Brunswick got the brunt of the snow with Miramichi picking up a whopping 43 cm of snow while Greater Moncton had a hefty 28 cm.

Most of the snow in Nova Scotia fell over northern and eastern areas with heavy rain falling elsewhere.

Strong winds up to 89 km/h caused a storm surge along the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast.

Gusts of more than 100 km/h were reported on Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton Island.