November 2017 – Seesaw temperatures

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Wildflowers and annuals in northeast Moncton, 03 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

As dark and dreary as November seems in Southeast New Brunswick, temperatures can often be volatile and this month was no exception.

Greater Moncton had at least five dramatic temperature swings starting on 10-11 November with a high of 10 C falling to -7 C with strong winds gusting up 69 km/h and the first snow flurries of the season.

The monthly mean of 1.9 C was exactly normal with highs near 20 C on two days early in the month while two days remained below freezing.

Overall precipitation was near normal for the first time since May although snowfall at 3.2 cm was well below normal.

NOVEMBER 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  7.2 C

Average LOW  -3.3 C

AVERAGE  1.9 C (Normal)

Extreme HIGH  19.8 C (06 Nov)

Extreme LOW  -10.6 C (28 Nov)

RAINFALL  101.8 mm (NEAR normal)

SNOWFALL  3.2 cm (about 80 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

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Arctic air chills Ontario

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Heavy snow in Mount Forest, ON, 10 Nov 2017 (TWN)

Temperatures have felt more like January than November across Ontario as an Arctic air mass brought snow and record cold to many communities.

Both Toronto Pearson and Toronto Island Airports set new lows early Friday and early Saturday near -10 C which in some cases dated back to the mid-1800s.

Police warned drivers to slow down on highways which became slick with the first snowfall of the season.

Dramatic drop in temperature

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Irishtown Reservoir, Moncton, 05 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

Autumn has made an abrupt return to Southeast New Brunswick.

The passage of a cold front lowered daytime highs in Greater Moncton from a near record of 19.3 C to a below seasonal high of 5.2 C over the past 24 hours.

Temperatures are poised to drop even lower later this week when the first blast of Arctic air this season moves into the Maritimes.

Environment Canada is forecasting a low of -7 C by early Saturday which will likely mean a hard, killing frost for any remaining sensitive vegetation.

April 2017 – Spring sputters

Budding trees in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 30 April 2017 (Dearing)

Spring seldom arrives on time in New Brunswick and this year is no exception even though April was actually warmer than normal in Greater Moncton.

The month can be broken into four segments – cold in the beginning, then warm, turning cold again and finally warm again near the end.

A consistent snow cover began on 27 November and disappeared briefly in late January before finally melting for the season by 10 April.

Precipitation overall was below average with much less snow than normal.

APRIL 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 10.5 C

Average LOW -0.8 C

AVERAGE 4.9 C (about 1.4 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 21.8 C (27 April)

Extreme LOW -7.7 C (01, 19 April)

RAINFALL 42.5 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 6.8 cm (about 75 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Canada’s Top 10 of 2016

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RCMP officer in burnt neighbourhood, Fort McMurray, AB, 05 May 2016 (Alberta RCMP)

From the horrible wildfires which destroyed parts of Fort McMurray, Alberta to the winter that wasn’t to a warm, dry summer which led to drought in areas of Eastern Canada, 2016 was certainly noteworthy for major weather events.

  1. Fort McMurray’s “Fire Beast”
  2. Super El Niño Cancels Winter – 2nd warmest Canada-wide ever
  3. August Long Weekend Storm on the Prairies… Big and Costly
  4. A Summer to Remember in the East
  5. November’s Heat Wave and December’s Deep Freeze
  6. Arctic Sea Ice Going, Going… Break-up earlier/Freeze-up later
  7. Wild Summer Prairie Weather
  8. A Tale of Two Springs – Cold East and Warm West
  9. Thanksgiving Day Atlantic Weather Bomb
  10. Southwest Ontario’s $100 Million September Gusher                                               (Courtesy Environment Canada)

November 2016 – Mild and dry

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Remembrance Day service at Sunny Brae cenotaph, Moncton, 11 Nov 2016 (Twitter)

The first two-thirds of November proved to be mostly mild and dry in Greater Moncton although small amounts of rain did fall on most days.

The last ten days of the month took a decidedly colder turn and while overnight lows weren’t very cold, daytime highs struggled in the low single digits.

A blast of winter came at the very end with 26 cm of heavy, wet snow which brought up precipitation amounts but the total was still almost 40 percent below normal.

NOVEMBER 2016 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton International Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  7.2 C

Average LOW  0.5 C

AVERAGE  3.8 C (about 1.9 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  13.7 C (14 November)

Extreme LOW  -4.6 C (29 November)

RAINFALL  35.8 mm (about 60 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL  28.1 cm (about 30 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Surprise! Lots of snow!

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Heavy, wet snow brings down tree branches in Moncton, 30 Nov 2016 (Twitter)

Greater Moncton recorded a snowfall of almost 30 cm today which is not unusual for the end of November.

But it came as a surprise since Environment Canada had only forecast 10 cm of snow.

The heavy, wet snow fell over central and southeastern parts of New Brunswick while mostly rain was recorded in Saint John and along the Fundy coast.

The snow was too much for some trees and branches which fell onto power lines knocking out electricity to more than 41,000 customers at one point.

Lest We Forget

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Remembrance Day service at Sunny Brae cenotaph, Moncton, 11 Nov 2016 (Twitter)


A light rain began falling shortly before the Remembrance Day service in Moncton’s Sunny Brae neighbourhood today.

It was a typical, grey November day but rather mild with a high of 9.4 C before the temperature fell during the afternoon.

Fortunately, the heaviest rain began falling after the service ended.

Warm in west, chilly in east

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Barren trees in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 05 Nov 2016 (Dearing)


Most trees have now lost their leaves in Greater Moncton – with oak trees being the exception – and the starkness of November is settling in.

The thermometer dipped to a frosty -3.1 C yesterday morning which was the coldest low so far this fall and a chilly high of only 4.5 C.

It’s a different story in the Prairies and northwestern Ontario with record breaking warm temperatures climbing near 20 C which is well above normal.

Edmonton climbed to 20.6 C on Friday which was the warmest high ever for a November day in the Alberta capital.

Rain, snow and ice pellets coming

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Pansies making a comeback on my patio, NE Moncton, 22 Nov 2015 (Dearing)

Grab your scarves and gloves in Southeast New Brunswick, the weather office is suggesting you may need them by tomorrow night.

Environment Canada has issued a rainfall warning for Greater Moncton with 50 to 70 mm expected over the next 24 hours thanks to a strong system moving into the region.

The temperature will drop to freezing by later tomorrow which means precipitation will change from rain to ice pellets and snow with 2 to 4 cm accumulation possible.

It could be worse – almost 25 cm of snow fell around this time of November back in 2011.