Heavy rain hits Maritimes

Ominous sky over Jones Lake, Moncton, 04 June 2019 (Dearing)

A slow moving low pressure system crossed the Maritime Provinces on Friday bringing heavy rain to the region.

Environment Canada had posted rainfall warnings for many areas with 40 to 60 mm in southern New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and up to 100 mm in northern Nova Scotia.

Here are some rainfall totals (in mm):

  • Parrsboro, NS  123
  • Greenwood, NS  81
  • Kejumkujik NP, NS  72
  • Saint John, NB  61
  • Charlottetown, PEI  54
  • Summerside, PEI  53
  • Greater Moncton Airport, NB  52
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, NS  41
  • Fredericton, NB  30
  • Yarmouth, NS  22
Advertisements

Hello summer!

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 12:54 pm ADT and it was certainly welcome after a relentlessly cold spring.

Greater Moncton enjoyed 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight today but unfortunately the sun didn’t make an appearance due to lots of clouds and heavy rain.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will get shorter – ever so slowly starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions, The Weather Network is suggesting warmer than normal temperatures in July and into August with near normal precipitation.

Environment Canada is calling for near normal temperatures and near to slightly above normal precipitation.

Spring 2019 in review

Spring 2019
Meteorological spring in Southeast New Brunswick turned out to be colder and much wetter than normal compared to the 30-year average.

While March and April both had above normal temperatures, May was colder by a significant 2.4 degrees which brought down the overall seasonal average.

Rainfall was heavy in April and May and while snowfall was below normal for the three month period, the final snow flurries were spotted as late as 21 May.

April 2019 – Wet and chilly

Glorious sunset in NE Moncton, 22 Apr 2019 (Dearing)

Spring can be the most disappointing season of the year in New Brunswick and April 2019 was no exception with cloudy, cool and often wet conditions.

Surprisingly, Greater Moncton was close to normal in temperature but double the average amount of rain fell along with slightly more snow than usual.

Melting snow and heavy precipitation led to more disastrous flooding along the St. John River – almost as bad as last year’s historic water levels.

Only one day was fully below freezing and while nights weren’t that cold, daytime highs often struggled to reach the double digits.

APRIL 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  8.1°C

Average LOW  -1.0°C

AVERAGE  3.6°C (near normal)

Extreme HIGH  18.9°C (21 Apr)

Extreme LOW  -6.0°C (08 Apr)

RAINFALL  122.5 mm (about 100 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL  32.8 cm (slightly ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

March 2019 – Warmer with less snow

Irishtown Nature Park, Moncton, 31 Mar 2019 (Dearing)

March seemed quite cold overall in Southeast New Brunswick especially given some frigid overnight lows during the first ten days of the month.

Daytime highs improved dramatically after that culminating with a maximum of 16.8°C on the 31st.

However, only two days recorded temperatures with both highs and lows above freezing.

The month was also very dry with less than half of the normal rainfall and snowfall received.

MARCH 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 2.4°C

Average LOW -7.4°C

AVERAGE -2.5°C (about 0.4 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 16.8°C (31 Mar)

Extreme LOW -18.7°C (08 Mar)

RAINFALL 26.4 mm (about 50 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 35.6 cm (about 50 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Weather bomb crosses the continent

Bomb cyclone

Bomb cyclone centre in U.S. Midwest, 14 Mar 2019 (earth.nullschool.net)

A so-called bomb cyclone brought blizzard conditions to Colorado and now heavy rain,  flooding and even tornadoes to the U.S. Midwest.

The weather bomb occurs when there is a rapid drop in atmospheric pressure over a 24 hour period.

Further north, the storm is dumping snow across Minnesota as it moves into northwestern Ontario.

Severe thunderstorm watches have been posted for Southern Ontario with strong winds expected along with heavy rain.

New Brunswick will the effects this weekend with significant rainfall and gusty winds in the forecast.

Winter 2018-19 in Review

Winter 18-19
Wintry weather will undoubtedly continue in New Brunswick for the next few weeks but meteorological winter (December, January and February) is officially over.

In Greater Moncton, winter proved to be slightly colder than normal (0.3 degrees cooler) although the extreme low was not as cold as previous years.

Precipitation was about average for the season with slightly above normal rainfall and slightly below normal snowfall.

February 2019 – Cold & Stormy

img_0019

Aftermath of ice storm in NE Moncton, 08 Feb 2019 (Dearing)

February may be the shortest month but it certainly seemed a lot longer this year with bitterly cold and stormy conditions.

While January was snowy in Greater Moncton, all was quiet until the largest single snowfall of the year arrived at mid-month.

After several freeze-thaw cycles which produced icy conditions, the latter half became decidedly colder with bitter overnight lows and wind chills.

Strong winds and blowing snow created dangerous whiteout conditions during the last week wreaking havoc with transportation across New Brunswick.

FEBRUARY 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH -3.5°C

Average LOW -12.9°C

AVERAGE -8.3°C (about 0.7 degrees BELOW normal)

Extreme HIGH 7.2°C (05 Feb)

Extreme LOW -18.7°C (27 Feb)

RAINFALL 25.2 mm (just slightly BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 58.8 cm (about 10 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Heaviest snowfall of 2019

Courtesy NB Highway Cameras, 13 Feb 2019

Lots of rain, freezing rain and ice pellets have been recorded so far this year in Southeast New Brunswick but snow has been somewhat scarce – until today.

A Colorado Low made its way across the continent this week bringing lots of snow to the American Midwest, Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec before arriving in the Maritimes.

Greater Moncton received 26 cm of snow followed by ice pellets and some freezing rain/drizzle along with strong winds which created poor visibility.

Snowfall amounts were fairly consistent across most of Nova Scotia with 22 cm at Greenwood and Halifax Stanfield Airport, 21 cm in Sydney but only 11 cm in Yarmouth.

Environment Canada says cold weather will replace the snow for late week with a brief warmup and rain expected this weekend.

Coastal B.C. gets winter wallop

Victoria BC

Victoria, BC, 12 Feb 2019 (Royal BC Museum Inner Harbour Webcam)

Wintry weather doesn’t visit the coast of British Columbia very often but it certainly causes disruption when it arrives.

Following back to back snow days, Vancouver has picked up almost 25 cm of snow with higher amounts in the Fraser Valley and Victoria has recorded more than 40 cm.

An Arctic outflow pushing temperatures below freezing combined with low pressure off Vancouver Island is creating snowy rather than more typical rainy conditions.

Traffic and transit services were snarled, schools were cancelled and scattered power outages kept crews busy in the region.