November 2017 – Seesaw temperatures

img_9595

Wildflowers and annuals in northeast Moncton, 03 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

As dark and dreary as November seems in Southeast New Brunswick, temperatures can often be volatile and this month was no exception.

Greater Moncton had at least five dramatic temperature swings starting on 10-11 November with a high of 10 C falling to -7 C with strong winds gusting up 69 km/h and the first snow flurries of the season.

The monthly mean of 1.9 C was exactly normal with highs near 20 C on two days early in the month while two days remained below freezing.

Overall precipitation was near normal for the first time since May although snowfall at 3.2 cm was well below normal.

NOVEMBER 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  7.2 C

Average LOW  -3.3 C

AVERAGE  1.9 C (Normal)

Extreme HIGH  19.8 C (06 Nov)

Extreme LOW  -10.6 C (28 Nov)

RAINFALL  101.8 mm (NEAR normal)

SNOWFALL  3.2 cm (about 80 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Advertisements

Rain turns to snow!

img_9812

Snow covering grassy areas in NE Moncton, 23 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

After an intense late fall storm moved through the Maritimes, strong winds and colder air followed changing rain to snow.

Wind gusts were clocked as high as 139 km/h on the Confederation Bridge prompting a closure this morning.

Rainfall amounts were heavy in many areas including Greater Moncton at 43 mm, Saint John at 56 mm and Halifax Stanfield Airport recorded 33 mm.

Southeast New Brunswick also had several centimetres of snow earlier today which mainly stuck to grassy areas.

Rainfall warning for southern NB

img_9808

Heavy rain falls in northeast Moncton, 22 Nov 2017 (Dearing)

A low pressure system from the southwest brought significant rainfall for southern New Brunswick.

Environment Canada issued a rainfall warning with up to 50 mm expected along the Fundy coast, Greater Moncton and the Kennebecasis Valley.

Drivers are being warned about water pooling on roads and flash flooding.

Falling from a daytime high of 13 C to an overnight low of zero, rain could turn to snow with a slight accumulation possible.

Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

Philippe remnants heading to NB

Philippe
Tropical Storm Philippe, the 16th named storm and 18th tropical system of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season, is no more according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

The storm brought heavy rain to central Cuba and the Bahamas in addition to spawning several tornadoes when it crossed south Florida.

Sustained winds reached 95 km/h with higher gusts reported before Philippe weakened over the western Atlantic.

However, Environment Canada says the remnants are combining with a low pressure system which will bring strong winds and heavy rain to New Brunswick on Monday.

Western NB gets drenched

A slow moving frontal system brought heavy rain to western New Brunswick with about 20 mm falling per hour in the southwest.

Environment Canada reported 174 mm of rain in St. Stephen over a two day period which is a shocking amount considering about 180 mm fell from June to September.

Other amounts include 112 mm in Edmundston, 93 mm in Woodstock and 74 mm in Fredericton.

Rainfall totals were much lower in Southeast New Brunswick where only 27 mm fell at the Greater Moncton International Airport.

Tropical air with this system broke more record highs in Atlantic Canada with a maximum of 23.4 C in Moncton and Bouctouche, 23.5 C in Cheticamp, 22.0 C in Deer Lake and 21.2 C in Happy Valley-Goose Bay.

Rain is welcome relief

Drought2017

Autumn 2017 – Abnormally dry (YELLOW), Moderate drought (TAN), courtesy Agriculture Canada


Central New Brunswick is experiencing a moderate drought while much of the rest of the province is abnormally dry except for the Acadian Peninsula according to Agriculture Canada.

Forecasters say two weather systems could bring as much as 100 mm of rain on Thursday and Friday which is welcome relief for a prolonged dry period which began in early summer.

Environment Canada has issued rainfall warnings for western and southern New Brunswick but the Southeast is expecting less than 40 mm.

Meantime, more record highs were broken across the Maritimes today as southerly air continued to push temperatures well into the 20’s C.

Nate makes U.S. landfall twice

Nate

Canadian Hurricane Centre image, 12PM ADT, 08 Oct 2017 (EC)


After striking land in Louisiana and later in Mississippi early today, Hurricane Nate has weakened to a tropical storm as it heads inland over the Southeastern United States.

Sustained winds of 140 km/h had dropped to 70 km/h after landfall but storm surges caused flooding along the Gulf coast and more than 200 mm of rain could fall in some areas.

Nate originated in the southwestern Caribbean Sea and claimed more than 30 lives in Central America before moving northward.

The Canadian Hurricane Centre has issued a tropical cyclone statement for Southern Ontario with remnants of the storm expected to bring up to 40 mm of rain on Thanksgiving Day.

September 2017 – Summer continues

img_8892

Maple leaves changing colour in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 04 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

September turned out to be a continuation of summer in Southeast New Brunswick right up until month end.

Daytime highs in Greater Moncton climbed above 25 C on ten days and a monthly maximum of 31.1 C turned out to be the warmest of 2017 set in early fall (26 Sept).

Although hurricanes never directly affected the province, meteorologists say much of the warmth last month came from tropical air pushed northward from these storms.

Rainfall was exactly normal but almost all of the precipitation fell during a single rain event spread over two days (6-7 Sept).

SEPTEMBER 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  22.3 C

Average LOW  9.4 C

AVERAGE  15.8 C (about 2.2 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  31.1 C (26 Sept, warmest high of 2017)

Extreme LOW  0.6 C (30 Sept)

RAINFALL  93.5 mm (Exactly NORMAL)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Meteorological Summer in Greater Moncton

Maple tree turning colour in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, NB, 04 Sept 2017 (Dearing)


If you were looking for great summer weather in the province, Environment Canada says Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick was the place to find it this year. 

The average temperature for meteorological summer – June, July and August – was 18.1 C which is 0.7 degrees above normal. 

The weather office says humidity was often low, overnight lows were comfortable but 8 days hit 30 C or higher compared to a typical 4 to 5. 

The downside was a lack of precipitation with 155 mm of rain recorded which is 40 percent less than the summer average of 268 mm.