Teddy by the numbers

Hurricane Teddy transitioned into a large post-tropical system before it made landfall in eastern Nova Scotia Wednesday morning (23 September).

Teddy brought heavy rain and strong winds to much of the Maritime Provinces and here are the numbers:

Rainfall summary (in mm):

  • Ingonish Beach, NS 133
  • Bedford, NS 100
  • Halifax (downtown), NS 94
  • Summerside, PEI 68
  • Mechanic Settlement, NB 58
  • Greater Moncton, NB 40
  • Bouctouche, NB 34

Maximum wind gusts (in km/h):

  • Grand Etang, NS 145
  • Eskasoni First Nation, NS 119
  • Cheticamp, NS 109
  • Sydney (airport), NS 93
  • North Cape, PEI 82
  • Greater Moncton, NB 80
  • Saint John, NB 78

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Hot, dry summer continues

Dark brown shows severe drought, 31 July 2020 (Agriculture Canada)

Environment Canada calls summer 2020 ‘very unusual’ in New Brunswick given the extended periods of hot, humid weather.

As of today, Greater Moncton has recorded 25 days at or above 30°C this year – extraordinary given the average is 4.6 days.

If you want to cool off, head to the much cooler Fundy coast where only one day has climbed above 30°C in Saint John.

Unfortunately for farmers and gardeners, the heat comes during an extremely dry period with below normal precipitation in every month since last December.

As of 31 July, Agriculture Canada noted how Southeast and Northwest New Brunswick along with most of Prince Edward Island are now in a severe drought.

New record highs set in NB

Jones Lake, Moncton, NB, 28 May 2015 (Dearing)

It turned out to be a scorcher of a day in most of New Brunswick yesterday.

Environment Canada says nine communities set new record highs.

In Greater Moncton, the thermometer climbed to 31.5°C at the airport which beats the old area record of 30.6°C from 1929.

By mid-afternoon, the humidex had reached an unbearable 50 in Miramichi before the humidity level finally dropped.

The highest temperature in the province and all of Canada was Red Pines near Bathurst at 36.0°C.

Meanwhile, fog kept temperatures much cooler along the Fundy coast with a high of only 15°C in Saint John.

From cold to hot

Leaves are finally bursting out, Irishtown Nature Park, 24 May 2020 (Dearing)

Numerous record lows were set across the Maritimes early Sunday morning as temperatures plummeted under clear skies and light winds.

But the cold will be replaced by heat as the jet stream surges north over Eastern Canada this week.

Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for New Brunswick with unseasonably warm weather expected for late May.

Records will be challenged in Greater Moncton as daytime highs soar to 30°C and humidex values reach the mid-30’s.

New record lows set on 24 May:

  • Woodstock -4.7°C
  • Edmundston -3.0°C
  • Grand Manan -2.8°C
  • Bouctouche -1.9°C
  • Saint John -1.6°C
  • Kejimkujik NP -1.6°C
  • Summerside -1.4°C

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Warm spring day

Finally some warmth!

Southeast New Brunswick is trending slightly above normal for March but real heat has been absent until this weekend.

Greater Moncton reached 9.4°C which was a monthly high.

While Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton Island were cooler, some parts of the Maritimes got into the double digits.

Liverpool, Nova Scotia hit 13.9°C while Saint John recorded 10.5°C.

Coldest, snowiest yet this winter

Snow covered steps in NE Moncton, 19 Jan 2020 (Dearing)

On the heels of the coldest weather so far this winter in Greater Moncton with lows of -21°C comes the heaviest snowfall to date.

A Colorado Low arrived in the Maritimes on Sunday after delivering a blow to the middle of the continent including Ontario and Quebec.

Since it was already very cold across Southern New Brunswick, the snow that fell was light and dry – unlike so-called “heart attack” snow which is heavy and wet.

Snowfall totals (in cm):

  • Minto area  31
  • Greater Moncton Airport  25
  • Fredericton area  16
  • Saint John Airport  13
  • Miramichi  10
  • Bathurst  4

(Data courtesy volunteer observations)

White Christmas

Light snow falls on Boxing Day, Truro, NS, 26 Dec 2019 (Dearing)

Despite a relatively snow-free December, Greater Moncton still managed to have a White Christmas this year after all – but just barely.

Environment Canada reports 2 cm of snow on the ground at the airport Christmas morning which fits its official definition.

Other parts of southern New Brunswick and Nova Scotia did not have snow including in Truro where I spent the holiday.

Meteorologists say odds of a White Christmas have decreased in recent years.

Here are the odds for select Canadian cities (1994-2017 versus 1955-2017):

  • Moncton – 65% / 73%
  • Fredericton – 50% / 76%
  • Saint John – 45% / 60%
  • Charlottetown – 55% / 78%
  • Halifax – 40% / 54%
  • Montreal – 70% / 76%
  • Toronto – 45% / 52%
  • Winnipeg – 100% / 98%
  • Calgary – 60% / 59%
  • Vancouver – 10% / 10%

Wind & rain cause damage

Roof damage at apartment building, Heather Way, 10 Dec 2019 (City of Saint John)

Strong winds and heavy rain from a strong low pressure system caused damage to properties and localized flooding in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

The Saint John area was hard hit with wind gusts up to 95 km/h which led to power outages and roof damage to at least two apartment buildings.

No one was hurt but all tenants were evacuated and assisted by the Red Cross.

Many roads were closed due to flooding or fallen trees and there were voluntary evacuations in Sussex in low lying areas.

The storm also brought mild, record-breaking temperatures with highs of 11°C in Edmundston and 12°C in Bathurst and Woodstock.

Greater Moncton hit 13.7°C but the record for 10 December was 15°C from 1957.

Rainfall totals (in mm) as of 8am on 10 December 2019:

  • Mechanic Settlement, NB  94 mm
  • Saint John Airport  63 mm
  • Kejimkujik NP, NS  53 mm
  • Dorchester, NB  50 mm
  • Yarmouth, NS  43 mm
  • Halifax (city)  48 mm
  • Fredericton  33 mm
  • Greater Moncton 26 mm

Peak wind gusts (km/h):

  • Cheticamp area, NS  135
  • Sydney  106
  • Halifax (Shearwater)  102
  • Saint John Airport  95
  • Lunenburg  92
  • Grand Manan, NB  89

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Heavy, wet snow creates chaos

An early blast of winter in Moncton, 09 Nov 2019 (Dearing)

Some drivers were prepared when snow entered the forecast for the first time this week and had their winter tires installed.

But many drivers were caught off guard by the heavy, wet – sloppy – snow which fell across Southern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, northern Nova Scotia and southwestern Newfoundland.

A low pressure system brought rain on Thursday but snow fell by evening as the temperature dropped to the freezing point.

The snow continued throughout Friday creating slippery roads which left plow operators scrambling to deal with the early blast of winter.

Many minor accidents were reported with vehicles sliding into the ditch.

The Trans Canada Highway at Cobequid Pass was forced to close for several hours Friday night after numerous tractor trailers got stuck in snow and blocked the road.

Snowfall amounts (Thu-Fri) in cm:

  • Corner Brook 19.4
  • Greater Moncton 18.8
  • Fredericton 10-15 (estimate)
  • Deer Lake 13
  • Saint John 8.9
  • Halifax Stanfield 5.8
  • Charlottetown 3.9

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

More rain & wind for Maritimes

Few leaves remain on trees after strong winds, Irishtown Nature Park, 25 Oct 2019 (Dearing)

Another low pressure system moved through the Maritimes on Wednesday bringing a lot of rain to the region especially to western New Brunswick.

Winds were also a factor with this storm but for a shorter period of time even though the peak gust was 81 km/h which was slightly higher than last week.

Here some rainfall totals (mm):

  • Saint John  59
  • Edmundston  59
  • Bathurst  49
  • Fredericton  48
  • Miramichi  37
  • Sydney  30
  • Charlottetown  22
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  21
  • Greater Moncton  19

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)