March 2018 – Stormy!

Winter storm

Whiteout conditions during a winter storm, west end Moncton, 08 March 2018 (Dearing)

Although March came in like a lamb, it behaved like a lion in the days to follow with four Nor’easters over two weeks in Southeast New Brunswick.

The first storm brought 15 cm, the second and third storms each delivered 16 cm and the fourth packed the biggest punch with 30 cm.

By 23 March, the snow cover in Greater Moncton had reached 40 cm which was the heaviest of the winter even though it was already spring.

Temperatures during the first half were mild averaging near the freezing point with brief cold snaps around the middle and near the end of the month.

MARCH 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  1.3 C

Average LOW  -4.7 C

AVERAGE  -1.7 C (about 1.2 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  9.1 C (29 Mar)

Extreme LOW  -15.4 C (26 Mar)

RAINFALL  11.0 mm (almost 80 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL  102.3 cm (about 40 percent ABOVE normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Advertisements

Freezing fog!

img_1382

Freezing fog in Summerside, PEI, 27 March 2018 (Twitter)

Residents of Southeast New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island woke up to freezing fog this morning.

This occurs when water droplets develop during fog and freeze instantly when temperatures are below freezing.

The last three early mornings in Greater Moncton have been below -10°C and have dropped to a near record low of -15.4°C.

With nearly 40 cm of snow on the ground, this is the heaviest cover of white this winter season – keeping in mind this is now early spring.

Snow vanishes!

img_0461

Bare ground in west end Moncton after rain washes away snow cover, 24 Jan 2018 (Dearing)

The snow cover in Greater Moncton has disappeared after the latest storm system rolled through with mixed precipitation and mild temperatures.

Rainfall amounts varied from 20 to 70 mm across New Brunswick, up to 8 hours of freezing rain fell in Gagetown and 20 cm of snow was recorded in Bathurst and Edmundston.

Record highs for 23 January were set in Saint John at 10.4 C and St. Stephen reached 11.3 C.

Since a consistent snow cover began on 09 December in Southeast New Brunswick, the ground has been bare a couple of times for short periods.

April 2017 – Spring sputters

Budding trees in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 30 April 2017 (Dearing)

Spring seldom arrives on time in New Brunswick and this year is no exception even though April was actually warmer than normal in Greater Moncton.

The month can be broken into four segments – cold in the beginning, then warm, turning cold again and finally warm again near the end.

A consistent snow cover began on 27 November and disappeared briefly in late January before finally melting for the season by 10 April.

Precipitation overall was below average with much less snow than normal.

APRIL 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 10.5 C

Average LOW -0.8 C

AVERAGE 4.9 C (about 1.4 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 21.8 C (27 April)

Extreme LOW -7.7 C (01, 19 April)

RAINFALL 42.5 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 6.8 cm (about 75 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Spring may finally arrive in N.B.

Snow finally melting in NE Moncton, 05 April 2017 (Dearing)


Good news… spring may finally be arriving!

Environment Canada says the recent winter-like grip over Southeast New Brunswick will finally give way to milder temperatures and rain beginning later this week.

Temperatures will finally climb into the double digits Celsius by Friday for the first time since 01 March!

Localized flooding is possible over ground which may still be frozen and in areas with a significant snow cover.

Another sign of a change in seasons is the return of many migratory birds in Greater Moncton this week with chirping sounds not heard in months.

Snow buries central Newfoundland

Gander snow Apr4-17

Snow nearly buries two-storey homes in Gander, NL, 04 April 2017 (Twitter)


Residents of Gander might be asking, what have we done to deserve this Mother Nature?

Snow has finally stopped falling central Newfoundland after an exceptional stretch of blizzards which have brought a record 135 cm in just six days.

Drivers were being urged to stay off highways in the region as the plows struggled and often got stuck keeping up with the heavy snow.

Schools were closed for a third day and many businesses and government offices were shuttered.

Meteorologists say Gander now has 241 cm of snow on the ground which is an all-time record beating 174 cm from 2004.

Rain and milder temperatures are in the forecast which raises concerns about rapid snow melt and possible flooding by next week.

White Christmas guaranteed

24dec

For the first time since 2013, Southeast New Brunswick will have a White Christmas.

Although it was mild and rainy on Christmas Eve, not enough showers will fall to wash away the roughly 10 cm of lying snow in Greater Moncton.

Christmas Day is expected to be sunny with seasonal temperatures.

The only two parts of Canada that will not have a White Christmas are the Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia and the Pacific coast of British Columbia.

Snowtober in Saskatchewan!

saskatoon-snow

Snow in Saskatoon, SK, 05 Oct 2016 (Twitter)


A storm being dubbed Snowtober – Snow in October – has dropped as much as 40 cm of snow on parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Saskatoon received about 20 cm of snow which broke a 100-year-old record yesterday of 5.6 cm while Cypress Hills Park got 40 cm.

Forecasters say the snow cover may stick around for a few days with single digit highs in the long range outlook.

The normal daytime high in Saskatoon for early October is 14 C.

Snow cover officially melts

Environment Canada data shows the seasonal snow cover officially melted on 27 April in Greater Moncton – just prior to almost 14 cm of heavy, wet snow falling in Southeast New Brunswick.

A permanent snow cover began later in the season than usual – 04 January – which means the ground was covered in white for 114 days.

The period was actually longer during the 2013-14 season, when snow covered the ground from 12 December to 17 April which is a total of 127 days.

Snow almost gone in Greater Moncton

Snowbank in NE Moncton, 20 April 2015 (Dearing)

Snowbank in NE Moncton, 20 April 2015 (Dearing)


After the snow cover officially melts in Greater Moncton, the region will have logged more than 100 days with the ground covered in white.

A white blanket appeared later than usual this winter – early January – but a series of major snow events over the following several weeks would come close to breaking a seasonal snow record.

As of today, 20 April, about 6 cm of snow is still lying on the ground but rain in the forecast for tomorrow will likely take care of that.