Deep snow cover across N.B.

NB map
This has been a very snowy winter across northern New Brunswick with Edmundston and Bas-Caraquet recording 114 cm of snow on the ground as of today (06 March).

Some unofficial reports have indicated a snow depth of more than 160 cm in some mountainous areas.

Southern New Brunswick also has plenty of snow but often it has been mixed with rain, freezing rain or ice pellets which have lowered accumulations.

Greater Moncton now sits at 53 cm (the most so far this season) and snowbanks are getting high enough to cause visibility issues at some intersections.

Plenty of snow near Caraquet, NB (Village Historique Acadian/IG)

Labrador coast buried in snow!

Labrador typically receives some of the highest amounts of snow in Canada during the winter which stretches from October to April – and this season is no exception.

A coastal blizzard has buried the community of Makkovik with almost 110 cm of snow falling since late last week.

Social media posts have showed entrances to buildings blocked and the snow depth higher than local residents trying to dig out.

Based on the 30-year average, Makkovik usually gets about 411 cm per year with only July and August not recording measurable snow.

Snow cover lingers across Canada

snowApr18
We know it snows in Canada in April but an astonishing amount of snow remains on the ground for the middle of the month.

The only snow-free areas as of 18 April are mainland Nova Scotia, extreme SW Ontario, southern Manitoba, SW Saskatchewan, SE Alberta, coastal British Columbia and southern valleys of the interior.

Even much of the northeastern United States and the upper Great Lakes region is still covered in white.

In Greater Moncton, the snow has mostly disappeared except for man-made snowbanks but as much as 100 cm remains in northern New Brunswick.

Great snow melt underway

Snow melting in Riverview, 24 Feb 2017 (Dearing)

Mild temperatures have been melting lots of snow in Southeast New Brunswick this week.

Greater Moncton now has about 50 cm on the ground compared to more than 110 cm only a week ago.

The daytime high climbed to 11.5 C at the airport on Friday but a private weather station recorded a maximum of 14.6 C at Jones Lake.

Environment Canada is forecasting the warmth to continue for the next few days with a sudden cold snap expected to arrive later in the week.

N.B. launches annual River Watch program

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Irishtown Park pond, 13 March 2016 (Dearing)


Public safety officials in New Brunswick officially launched the annual River Watch program today which monitors and forecasts water flow in the province’s rivers and streams.

The snowpack is much lower this year compared to previous years – especially the record level of 2015.

Officials say the snowpack throughout the St. John River basin is about 57 percent below normal.

The weather is the most crucial factor in rising waters and possible flooding and forecasters say warm days and cold nights would be the most ideal conditions for a slow, steady melt.

California drought prompts water restrictions

Houseboats on lake near La Grange, California, USA (Getty)

Houseboats on lake near La Grange, California, USA (Getty)


A historic four-year drought in California has prompted water restrictions from the state government.

Cities and towns in America’s most populous state have been ordered to reduce their water usage by 25 percent.

Californians will be asked to reduce watering lawns, washing cars and even taking showers.

The action comes as the winter snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains is at near record lows, which the state heavily relies on for its summer water supply.

Accuweather unveils spring 2015 forecast

spring2015
Accuweather is predicting that the stormy pattern across Atlantic Canada this winter will likely continue into at least the first half of spring.

The weather service believes there is the potential for late-season snowstorms in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and heavy rain farther south and east in Nova Scotia and Newfoundland.

The combination of a stormy pattern and deep snowpack across New Brunswick and northern Nova Scotia will increase the flood threat across the region in early spring.