Fierce fall storm hits Eastern Canada

An intense low pressure system which absorbed the remnants of Tropical Storm Philippe unleashed its fury on Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes after racing through the Northeastern United States.

Environment Canada reports more than 100 mm of rain (a month’s worth) fell in Ottawa turning some streets into rivers in the National Capital (2017 is now its wettest year ever) and neighbouring Gatineau.

Strong winds gusted to 93 km/h at Ile d’Orleans with rainfall amounts of up to 90 mm across Southern Quebec.

Western New Brunswick felt the brunt of this storm in the Maritimes while Greater Moncton recorded 25 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 69 km/h.

Early fall heat

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 23 Sept 2017 (Dearing)

This may have been the first weekend of autumn in Southeast New Brunswick but it felt more like the first weekend of summer instead.

Greater Moncton climbed to 27.7 C yesterday (23 September) while today (24 September) it hit 27.9 C and the normal high for late September is 17 C.

High pressure and a northerly jet stream has pushed heat across Eastern Canada with highs in the low 30s C in many parts of Ontario and Southern Quebec.

A heat warning was in place as Toronto Pearson Airport reached a record-breaking 33.1 C yesterday and 33.6 C today.

Consistent snow totals across Maritimes

hfxsnow

Halifax Transit bus during a snowstorm, Halifax, NS, 12 Dec 2016 (Twitter)

The cleanup was underway across the Maritimes today after a Colorado Low dropped about 15-25 cm of snow – the same storm delivered similar amounts across Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec yesterday.

The Atlantic coast of Nova Scotia also saw a changeover to rain where temperatures climbed above freezing.

Here are some snow totals in the region:

Saint John  26 cm

Halifax Stanfield Airport  22

Greater Moncton Airport  19

Sydney  18

Charlottetown  14

Yarmouth  13

Fredericton 11

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Second major snowstorm of season

secondstormdec16

A low pressure system passed over the Bay of Fundy today bringing the second major snowstorm of the season with at least 20 cm for Southeast New Brunswick.

Schools closed, flights were cancelled at the Greater Moncton International Airport and several car crashes reported as road conditions worsened throughout the day.

Precipitation started as snow in Nova Scotia but later changed to freezing rain and then to rain as temperatures climbed above freezing.

The same Colorado Low impacted Southern Ontario earlier today delivering 15-30 cm snow from Windsor to Ottawa including the Greater Toronto Area and Southern Quebec including Montreal and Quebec City.

Widespread frost expected tonight

650x366_09181655_hd30Environment Canada has issued a frost advisory for a wide swath from Southern Ontario and Quebec to all of New Brunswick.

Temperatures are expected to fall to near freezing overnight in the south of the province to slightly below in the north thanks to an Arctic high pressure system.

To be on the safe side, I brought my plants inside from my patio tonight for the first time this season.

The forecast calls for a warming trend this weekend with highs in the low 20s C.

Hurricane Sandy coming ashore

Satellite image of Hurricane Sandy (courtesy NOAA)

Hurricane Sandy is expected to make landfall along the southern coast of New Jersey tonight.

Forecasters say in addition to long periods of sustained tropical storm-force winds, the storm will continue to produce historic surge levels along the coast.

In the U.S. Northeast, flights have been cancelled, train and subway service suspended, schools closed and even the New York Stock Exchange has shut down amid fears a surge of seawater could flood lower Manhattan.

The storm is being blamed for the sinking of the replica tall ship HMS Bounty off North Carolina and while the U.S. Coast Guard rescued most of the crew, two are still missing.

Environment Canada has issued wind warnings for Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec and says rainfall amounts could reach 50 mm in some areas.

No warnings have been issued for the Maritimes yet but forecasters say rain will be more of a factor than wind for the region.