Meteorological summer begins

ECsummer2017
Welcome to meteorological summer 2017 –  the months of June, July and August!

Environment Canada says Southeast New Brunswick has a 50% probability of having above normal temperatures.

Precipitation is expected to be near normal in New Brunswick but southern Nova Scotia has a 40% probability of having below normal rainfall.

Advertisements

SW Nova Scotia hit by drought

ponddry

Dry pond, Arcadia, Yarmouth Co., NS, 14 Sept 2016 (Comeau/Yarmouth Vanguard)

While it has been dry this summer in parts of New Brunswick, no where has it been drier in the Maritimes than in southwest Nova Scotia.

Meteorologists say while the jet stream normally flows through the middle of the region providing adequate amounts of rain, it was pushed farther north this summer due to the Bermuda High which has been northwest of its usual position.

As a result, rainfall in northern New Brunswick has been above average while southwest Nova Scotia has only received 32 percent of its normal summer precipitation.

For example, Yarmouth had 87 mm of rain during June, July and August which is well below the average of 268 mm.

Emergency management officials say at least 1,000 households have run out of water and bottled water donations from major retailers are being shipped to affected communities.

Winter storm number five!

tmp_SC20140103-092831-1-542397384The first winter storm of 2014 – number five of the season – is impacting the Maritimes today.

Southwest Nova Scotia is expected to bear the brunt of this disturbance packing as much as 30 cm of snow and strong winds with a blizzard warning in effect.

Greater Moncton is forecast to receive about 10 cm of snow and gusty winds creating blowing and drifting snow.

The storm that wasn’t

March didn’t come in like a lion in Southeast New Brunswick afterall.

Forecasters were predicting as much as 20 cm of snow from a low pressure system which impacted Ontario and the American Midwest.

But the system tracked further south than expected and Southwest Nova Scotia got the worst of the storm.

Greater Moncton did receive periods of freezing drizzle mixed with snow but accumulation was less than 4 cm.