Back-to-back systems batter N.B.

Freshly fallen snow in west end Moncton, 29 Nov 2018 (Dearing)

Southeast New Brunswick has been under a gloomy, grey sky all week thanks to a couple of low pressure systems.

The first one brought rain, drizzle and fog while the second brought heavy, wet snow to make this November one of the snowiest in recent memory.

Eastern New Brunswick got the brunt of the snow with Miramichi picking up a whopping 43 cm of snow while Greater Moncton had a hefty 28 cm.

Most of the snow in Nova Scotia fell over northern and eastern areas with heavy rain falling elsewhere.

Strong winds up to 89 km/h caused a storm surge along the Gulf of St. Lawrence coast.

Gusts of more than 100 km/h were reported on Prince Edward Island and Cape Breton Island.

Advertisements

Bitter cold ahead of more snow

Temperatures sunk early Monday across the Maritimes with some New Brunswick locations shattering records by almost five degrees dating back to the 1880’s.

The bitter cold precedes another storm system which could bring up to 25 cm of snow to southern New Brunswick, most of Prince Edward Island and northern Nova Scotia.

While it plunged to -14.7°C in Greater Moncton, the 1936 record still stands at -16.7°C.

Here are some of the new record lows set in the region on 19 November:

  • Bathurst, NB -22.5°C
  • Woodstock, NB -21.4°C
  • Miramichi, NB -20.2°C
  • Kouchibouguac, NB -20.0°C
  • Summerside, PE -15.7°C
  • Charlottetown, PE -15.2°C

November snow 2008-17

NOVEMBER snowfalls in Greater Moncton
Year Snow event Total monthly snowfall
2017 3.2 cm
2016 Nov. 30 had 26 cm 37.4 cm
2015 4.0 cm
2014 Nov. 26-27 had 32 cm 55.8 cm
2013 3.4 cm
2012 No measurable snow
2011 Nov. 23 had 21.6 cm 25.0 cm
2010 Nov. 27 had 10.6 cm 26.2 cm
2009 7.4 cm
2008 Nov. 22 had 32.7 cm

42.1 cm

November can often be a hard month to predict when it comes to how much snow may fall in New Brunswick.

As the chart above shows for Greater Moncton, some years may have only a few centimetres or even barely a snowflake as was the case in 2012.

However, it only takes one major storm to push up the totals such as in 2014 with almost 56 cm of snow.

Much of the month’s accumulation tends to come from several snowfalls of just a couple centimetres each and often there are no major snow events.

The thirty year snowfall average (1981-2010) for November at the Greater Moncton Airport is 19.4 cm.

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

U.S. Northeast hit by early season snow

Snow falling in Washington, DC, USA, 15 Nov 2018 (Instagram)

A significant November snowstorm took meteorologists by surprise yesterday when more snow fell and for longer than originally forecast.

A Nor’easter moved up the U.S. Eastern Seaboard dropping 16 cm of snow on New York City which created commuter chaos with train delays and dozens of drivers trapped in their vehicles on treacherous highways.

While Washington, DC only picked up about 4 cm – the biggest November snowfall in three decades – it was to take road crews by surprise and some schools were closed.

The precipitation also included ice pellets and freezing rain with an eventual changeover to rain.

The storm also brought between 10 and 20 cm of snow across Southern Ontario with Toronto Pearson Airport picking up 11 cm.

The same system is now impacting the Maritimes.

Enough rain already!

Another low pressure system is heading to the Maritimes with two rounds of rain starting early Tuesday stretching into early Wednesday.

Environment Canada says Greater Moncton could receive up to 35 mm of rain but some parts of the region could get 50 mm or more prompting rainfall warnings.

Winds associated with this system will be much lighter compared to the destructive winds over the weekend.

Meantime, NB Power reports about 27,000 customers remain without electricity (at 11pm AST) since restoration efforts began Sunday morning after a weekend rain and wind storm.

Nor’easter follows record cold

Snow settles in NE Moncton before a changeover to rain, 28 Oct 2018 (Dearing)

A frosty Saturday morning proved record breaking at the Greater Moncton International Airport when the thermometer plunged to -6.6°C which breaks the previous cold low from 1998 by 0.1°C.

Frigid temperatures were also set in Edmundston at -12.2°C, Woodstock at -11.7°C and Saint John at -8.4°C with weather records going back to 1886.

The Arctic cold was soon replaced by a low pressure system with some tropical moisture from the remnants of Hurricane Willa.

The early season Nor’easter brought snow, ice pellets and eventually rain to the Maritimes along with gusty winds which uprooted trees in parts of New England.

Michael strikes Florida panhandle

Hurricane Michael damage in Panama City, FL, USA, 10 Oct 2018 (Instagram)

Hurricane Michael slammed the coastline of the Florida panhandle making landfall mid-afternoon as a Category 4 storm.

Michael is the strongest hurricane to hit the United States since Camille in 1969 with winds up to 250 km/h and as much as 300 mm of rain.

Warmer than normal water temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico helped fuel Michael and the accompanying storm surge which submerged communities near Panama City.

Forecasters say the storm was downgraded to a Category 1 as it crossed Georgia.

Michael is expected to weaken to a post-tropical depression by the time it passes south of Nova Scotia on Saturday.

Tornadoes tear through Ottawa

Damage from a tornado in west end Ottawa, ON, 22 Sept 2018 (Instagram)

Environment Canada has confirmed two powerful tornadoes ripped through west end Ottawa before touching down again in Gatineau across the Ottawa River.

Officials say dozens were hurt and at least two residents are in hospital with critical injuries.

Tens of thousands were left without power after at least 80 utility poles either snapped or were damaged.

Meteorologists say severe thunderstorms spawned one twister classified as an EF-3 with winds up to 265 km/h while another tornado was an EF-2 with winds up to 220 km/h.

Tornadoes are not uncommon in Southern Ontario but storms of this strength are rare.

Florence called a ‘monster’

More than two million residents have been evacuated as Hurricane Florence roars toward the Southeastern United States with sustained winds of more than 175 km/h.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the Category 2 storm is taking aim at North and South Carolina on Thursday.

A life threatening storm surge is expected along the Atlantic coast with an incredible 800 mm (30 inches) rain possible.

Emergency officials call Florence “a monster” and cities like Myrtle Beach have become eerily empty as the hurricane approaches.

Hail Calgary!

CalgaryhailJul18

A sea of white – hail – on a Calgary highway, 23 July 2018 (Global/C. Bills)

It looked like a snowstorm in July as violent thunderstorms rolled across southern Alberta on Monday covering Calgary in golf ball-sized hail.

Traffic was snarled during the afternoon commute as drivers coped with hail piling up like snow.

By early evening, the storms had passed and Environment Canada dropped severe thunderstorm warnings for the region.

Calgary is dubbed the hailstorm capital of Canada and south central Alberta is known to be one of the worst areas of the world for thunderstorms producing damaging hail.