Stormy Saturday in Maritimes

Ominous sky over Moncton, 10 Aug 2019 (B. Smith-Peterson/Facebook)

A line of strong thunderstorms moved across New Brunswick, western Prince Edward Island and eastern Nova Scotia on Saturday bringing heavy downpours, hail and strong winds.

Greater Moncton was under a severe thunderstorm warning for a few hours with hail about 1 cm in diameter being reported outside the city.

Heavy rain also caused flash flooding in downtown Shediac with social media posts showing vehicles making their way through water clogged streets.

Temperatures also plunged from the low 20s to the mid-teens as the storms passed.

Although the rain is needed, concert goers might disagree with the first show being staged on Magnetic Hill today in four years.

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July 2019 – Warm and dry

A fiery looking sunset in Moncton, 27 July 2019 (Dearing)

After a cold start to July in Greater Moncton, temperatures climbed rapidly and hit a monthly high of 34.0°C within the first week.

Environment Canada says the temperature reached 30°C or higher on eight days during the month.

The monthly average was 20.0°C or 1.2 degrees above normal.

July 2018 was still warmer in Moncton with a historic average of 21.4°C.

Besides being warm, it was also dry with less than half of the 92 millimetres of rain which typically falls.

JULY 2019 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  27.8°C

Average LOW  14.8°C

AVERAGE  20.0°C (about 1.2 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  34.0°C (05 July)

Extreme LOW  8.7°C (13 July)

RAINFALL  44.2 mm (about 50 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Severe weather moves across N.B.

Dark clouds northwest of Moncton, 31 July 2019 (Dearing)

A line of severe thunderstorms slid through New Brunswick tonight producing heavy rain, hail and strong, gusty winds up to 100 km/h.

Small funnel clouds were noticed but no reports of tornadoes.

Environment Canada issued watches and warnings for many parts of the province including Greater Moncton.

The ridge of storm clouds passed to the northwest of the city and not a single drop of rain fell but it did drop temperatures enough to end the heat warning.

Heat building in the Maritimes

Beach

A fine day at Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 27 July 2019 (Dearing)

A heat warning has been in place since the start of the weekend in much of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia (except for Cape Breton) and Prince Edward Island.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 30 C on Saturday and 29 C today but the forecast calls for 30 C on Monday and 31 C for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Overnight lows are not expected to drop that much either hovering around 18 to 19 C.

While humidity has been relatively low this weekend at around 50 percent or less, Environment Canada says the warm air mass will become more humid this week.

The only relief will be along the Fundy coast where temperatures will stay in the low 20s.

Historic heat in Western Europe

The jet stream has carried hot air from northern Africa across western Europe which is shattering all-time record highs in numerous countries.

The second extreme heat wave this summer has set new maximums in Belgium at 38.9 C, the Netherlands at 39.2 C and Germany at 40.5 C.

Bordeaux, France reached 41.2 C on Tuesday which was its highest temperature ever.

Thanks to the urban heat island effect, major cities are more prone to hot weather than rural areas and don’t cool down that much overnight.

On Thursday, the UK Met Office believes Britain could smash its current historic high of 38.5 C recorded in Faversham in August 2003.

Thunderstorms cool off Eastern Canada

Thunderstorms rolling across Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec this weekend brought an end to oppressive heat and humidity.

Toronto residents were trying to keep cool Saturday when the mercury soared to 33.0°C with a stifling humidex of 44 and Montreal reported similar conditions.

In the Maritimes, even typically cooler coastal areas were warm with new record highs set in Saint John and Grand Manan.

The temperature in Greater Moncton peaked at 32.4°C which fell short of the record of 33.5°C from 1991.

A brief, violent thunderstorm hit Halifax on Sunday afternoon with flash flooding and strong winds knocking out power to more than 44,000 Nova Scotians.

Baked Alaska!

Hot weather is rare for Anchorage which has reached an all-time high of 32°C (90°F) but in Alaska’s interior, heat is not unknown.

Fairbanks has previously topped out at 37°C (99°F) and the all-time Alaska state high was 38°C (100°F) in Fort Yukon from 1915.

Meteorologists say a strong high pressure system has been sitting stationary over the state creating the heat wave.

Smoke from wildfires has drifted into many communities creating air quality problems.

Neighbouring Yukon has also been affected by smoke with Whitehorse and Dawson City recording above normal temperatures in the high 20’s since late June.

Here comes the heat!

The view from Economy Point, NS, 03 July 2019 (Dearing)

After a cool and wet start to summer, a blast of heat is heading to the Maritime Provinces over the next few days.

Environment Canada has issued heat warnings for most of New Brunswick – excluding the Fundy coast – and western Nova Scotia while other areas under a special weather statement.

A warm, humid air mass is moving into the region today raising daytime temperatures to 30°C or more.

Humidex values near 40 are expected and overnight lows may not fall below 18°C providing little relief from the heat.

Near normal values will return late Saturday as a cold front arrives.

Heat warnings are also in place for parts of Ontario and Quebec where it climbed into the low 30s yesterday.

Chilly nights!

Last Zero
The last couple of nights have been chilly across New Brunswick with overnight lows in the low single digits.

While Greater Moncton fell to 5.5°C which was a few degrees away from the record, the same minimum in Bouctouche was cold enough to set a new low.

Edmundston dipped to a nippy 1.1°C which tied its record as did Grand Manan when it dropped to 3.8°C.

Over the last six years in Greater Moncton, the chart above shows temperatures have not fallen to the freezing point or lower after early June.

Hello summer!

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 12:54 pm ADT and it was certainly welcome after a relentlessly cold spring.

Greater Moncton enjoyed 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight today but unfortunately the sun didn’t make an appearance due to lots of clouds and heavy rain.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will get shorter – ever so slowly starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions, The Weather Network is suggesting warmer than normal temperatures in July and into August with near normal precipitation.

Environment Canada is calling for near normal temperatures and near to slightly above normal precipitation.