Stormy Saturday in Maritimes

Ominous sky over Moncton, 10 Aug 2019 (B. Smith-Peterson/Facebook)

A line of strong thunderstorms moved across New Brunswick, western Prince Edward Island and eastern Nova Scotia on Saturday bringing heavy downpours, hail and strong winds.

Greater Moncton was under a severe thunderstorm warning for a few hours with hail about 1 cm in diameter being reported outside the city.

Heavy rain also caused flash flooding in downtown Shediac with social media posts showing vehicles making their way through water clogged streets.

Temperatures also plunged from the low 20s to the mid-teens as the storms passed.

Although the rain is needed, concert goers might disagree with the first show being staged on Magnetic Hill today in four years.

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Severe weather moves across N.B.

Dark clouds northwest of Moncton, 31 July 2019 (Dearing)

A line of severe thunderstorms slid through New Brunswick tonight producing heavy rain, hail and strong, gusty winds up to 100 km/h.

Small funnel clouds were noticed but no reports of tornadoes.

Environment Canada issued watches and warnings for many parts of the province including Greater Moncton.

The ridge of storm clouds passed to the northwest of the city and not a single drop of rain fell but it did drop temperatures enough to end the heat warning.

Historic heat in Western Europe

The jet stream has carried hot air from northern Africa across western Europe which is shattering all-time record highs in numerous countries.

The second extreme heat wave this summer has set new maximums in Belgium at 38.9 C, the Netherlands at 39.2 C and Germany at 40.5 C.

Bordeaux, France reached 41.2 C on Tuesday which was its highest temperature ever.

Thanks to the urban heat island effect, major cities are more prone to hot weather than rural areas and don’t cool down that much overnight.

On Thursday, the UK Met Office believes Britain could smash its current historic high of 38.5 C recorded in Faversham in August 2003.

Thunderstorms cool off Eastern Canada

Thunderstorms rolling across Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec this weekend brought an end to oppressive heat and humidity.

Toronto residents were trying to keep cool Saturday when the mercury soared to 33.0°C with a stifling humidex of 44 and Montreal reported similar conditions.

In the Maritimes, even typically cooler coastal areas were warm with new record highs set in Saint John and Grand Manan.

The temperature in Greater Moncton peaked at 32.4°C which fell short of the record of 33.5°C from 1991.

A brief, violent thunderstorm hit Halifax on Sunday afternoon with flash flooding and strong winds knocking out power to more than 44,000 Nova Scotians.

State of emergency lifted in Alberta

AB Yellowhead County July 10.19

Highway cut in half by floodwaters in Yellowhead County, AB, 10 July 2019 (Facebook)

Days of severe weather including heavy rain, thunderstorms, hail, tornadoes and flooding led officials in western Alberta to declare a state of emergency.

However, Yellowhead County (west of Edmonton) dropped the declaration on Wednesday when floodwaters receded.

Many roads had to be closed or were made impassable after flooding and drivers were being asked to obey any barriers in place.

Residents were being warned about possible contamination of their drinking water.

Yellowhead County officials say at least 25 homes were directly impacted by floodwaters.

Brief heat wave ends

Aboiteau Beach, Cap-Pele, NB, 04 July 2019 (Dearing)

In less than two hours, the temperature in Greater Moncton dropped from 31.1°C to 24.0°C late this afternoon – a difference of seven degrees.

A cold front moved through New Brunswick with thunderstorms marking an abrupt end to the summer’s first brief heat wave.

Environment Canada even issued a tornado warning for the Grand Lake area after a possible twister developed south of Boiestown.

The warning was lifted after 30 minutes and no damage or injuries were reported.

Record highs have been broken in a number of communities across the Maritimes.

Friday, 05 July:

  • Kouchibouguac NP, new record 31.1°C, old record 33.9°C from 1939
  • Grand Manan, new record 31.7°C, old record 30.0°C from 1999
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport, 32.7°C, old record 31.4°C from 2013

Greater Moncton was within a hair of breaking a record Saturday and Sunday it was the warmest on that date since 2013.

  • 05 July, high 34.0°C, record 34.2°C from 2018
  • 06 July, high 31.4°C, record 35.0°C from 1911

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Freak hailstorm in western Mexico

Guadalajara was inundated with almost one metre of hail when a freak hailstorm moved through parts of Jalisco state on Sunday.

The governor posted photos on social media of buried vehicles, damaged homes and city workers alongside the Mexican Army shoveling the hail – even bulldozing it.

No reports of injuries or fatalities.

At 1,600 metres (5,000 feet) above sea level, meteorologists say high elevation played a role as one thunderstorm moved out and another one developed rapidly behind it bringing a huge quantity of small hailstones.

Thundersnow in B.C.!

A thunderstorm with snow is called thundersnow and it struck the British Columbia Interior just two days before the start of summer!

An unstable air mass bringing cold air from Alaska is to blame for the rare thundersnow which covered mountainous terrain in the Okanagan Valley with about 10 cm.

Snow fell above 1500 metres with a snow/rain mix down to 1100 metres and a chilly rain at sea level.

About 10 cm of snow was also expected in the Alberta Rockies from a similar system.

Severe weather in Manitoba, NW Ontario

tstorms
After a hot and windy day across southern Manitoba, severe thunderstorms developed late Friday afternoon with heavy rain, hail and lightning strikes causing at least one grass fire.

Daytime highs soared to 36.6°C in Winnipeg and 37.3°C in Carman which was the hot spot in Canada.

Temperatures dropped dramatically after the storms rolled through and damaging winds up to 100 km/h were reported in some areas along with nickel-sized hail.

The heat and thunderstorms moved east into northwestern Ontario with Kenora reaching 33.0°C yesterday and Armstrong climbing to 32.3°C today.

Tornado hits National Capital Region

 

A tornado developed about 10 kilometres southeast of Gatineau Airport, Quebec early Sunday evening.

The tornado moved east along the Ottawa River before coming ashore on the Ontario side.

In the suburban Ottawa neighbourhood of Orléans, strong winds brought down trees and removed shingles on many homes with one person reportedly injured.

A thunderstorm also produced 2 centimetre hail in the area.

Environment Canada says the tornado was a low end EF-1 suggesting peak winds of 135 km/h and had a path length of at least 25 kilometres.