Ontario warmth heading East!


West coast goes white


Kitsilano neighbourhood,Vancouver, BC, 19 Dec 2017 (Twitter)

It doesn’t snow in Vancouver very often but when it does panic typically ensues on streets and sidewalks.

About 7 cm fell at Vancouver International Airport yesterday with higher amounts reported to the north and east.

Snow also fell on Vancouver Island with only 3 cm in Victoria but at least 20 cm in Nanaimo.

Parts of the British Columbia interior picked up more than 30 cm.

Nor’easter nails Maritimes


Snow plow clearing streets in Moncton, 10 Feb 2017 (Twitter/CityofMoncton)

The latest Nor’easter moved up the U.S. Eastern Seaboard with lots of energy as it headed for the Maritimes.

The winter storm brought heavy snow and strong northeast winds to the region.

Snowfall totals as of midday:

St. Stephen: 38 cm

Greater Moncton: 24 cm

Charlottetown: 24 cm

Fredericton: 23 cm

Saint John: 19 cm

Kentville: 19 cm

Yarmouth: 17 cm

Halifax Stanfield Airport: 15 cm

Canada’s Top Ten Weather Stories 2014

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

Each year Environment Canada compiles a list of the ten most significant weather events across the country and the following is how 2014 shaped up:

1. Canada’s Long Cold Winter – While much of the country shivered under cold and snowy conditions, Southeast New Brunswick was actually rainier and slightly warmer than normal.

2. Summer Flooding in the Eastern Prairies – Too much rain too fast over too many days led to extensive flooding in Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

3. Wildfires in the West and Northwest – Exceptional warmth and dryness led to an abundance of wildfires in British Columbia and the Northwest Territories.

4. The Nightmare Before, During and After Christmas – A series of snow and ice storms in late 2013 and early 2014 left thousands without power for days from Ontario to Atlantic Canada.

5. Summer – Hot on Coasts, Cool in Centre – While British Columbia and Atlantic Canada enjoyed above normal temperatures, it never really got that hot or hazy in Ontario.

6. Hurricane Arthur – The first hurricane of the Atlantic season in early July packed a punch in the Maritimes with hundreds of trees toppling over on power lines leaving many in the dark for days.

7. Alberta Hailstorm – A series of thunderstorms in early August moved across Southern Alberta producing tennis to baseball-sized hailstones and covering the ground like snow.

8. Powerful December Storms on Coasts – Three storms in rapid succession battered the Pacific coast while an East Coast deluge delivered 150 mm of rain in Greater Moncton over two days and caused extensive flooding.

9. Ontario Tornadoes – The province recorded 19 this year with the worst twister in Angus near Barrie on 17 June which damaged more than 100 homes after peak wind gusts up to 220 km/h.

10. Snowtember in Alberta – The so-called snow event brought summer-like temperatures to a screeching halt on 07 September when upwards of 40 cm of snow fell on Calgary and region over the next three days.

Nor’easter brings rain, wind and snow to N.B.

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

Snow in Fredericton, NB, 02 November 2014 (Twitter)

At the height of the Nor’easter, the rain/snow line across New Brunswick stretched from Charlotte County to Grand Lake to Miramichi.

Greater Moncton received steady rain this weekend with 52 mm reported as of 5pm AST while snow and ice pellets fell in Fredericton and up to 30 cm snow expected for western and northern New Brunswick.

Thousands across the province lost power during the storm due to strong, gusty winds and heavy snow bringing down tree branches.

The same storm also brought early season snow to the Eastern United States mostly in the Appalachian Mountains from South Carolina to Maine.

Atlantic storm slams Nova Scotia

Flooding in Great Village, NS, 22 Sept 2014 (Twitter)

Flooding in Great Village, NS, 22 Sept 2014 (Twitter)

A strong Atlantic storm which moved across the Maritimes yesterday hit Nova Scotia the hardest with hurricane-force winds and heavy rain causing localized flooding.

In Great Village near Truro, a river spilled its banks after 50 mm of rain fell in just a few hours flooding homes and businesses.

Many trees and branches came down on Cape Breton Island after winds exceeded 120 km/h.

Greater Moncton felt the storm too with almost 40 mm of rain and a peak wind gust of 63 km/h.

Northern fires create poor air quality

Forest fire smoke envelops Yellowknife, NWT, 16 August 2014 (Twitter)

Forest fire smoke envelops Yellowknife, NWT, 16 August 2014 (Twitter)

More than 50 forest fires are currently listed as out of control in the Northwest Territories during what has become a summer of fires.

The blazes have scorched more than three million hectares of land and have created drifting smoke which has meant poor air quality in numerous communities including the capital of Yellowknife.

Smoke from the fires has also been carried southeastward by the jet stream to Ontario, Quebec and the Northeastern United States keeping daytime highs lower than normal.

Commercial fishermen also say the fires have dramatically raised temperatures in rivers and streams leading to a scarcity of fish.

Cleanup underway after Arthur

Trees and branches down in Fredericton, NB, 06 July 2014 (Twitter)

Trees and branches down in Fredericton, NB, 06 July 2014 (Twitter)

NB Power says the aftermath of Arthur is the worst event for outages in the history of the provincial utility.

At the peak, about 140,000 customers were left in the dark in New Brunswick and the majority of those were in the Fredericton region.

Officials in the provincial capital estimate more than 2,000 trees either came down or were damaged during the storm and that has created havoc for power crews.

A spokesperson for NB Power anticipates that 80 percent of customers will have electricity back by Wednesday.

In the meantime, a number of public buildings have been turned into recharging stations for medical devices, mobile phones and tablets/laptop computers.

UPDATE – Eight days after Arthur, NB Power is still reporting about 4,000 outages, mostly in Greater Fredericton, due to a tangled mess of downed trees and power lines.

Arthur downgraded to post-tropical storm

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

George Street in Fredericton, NB, 05 July 2014 (Twitter)

Arthur made landfall in the Maritimes as a post-tropical storm near Meteghan, Nova Scotia around 7:30 a.m. today.

Forecasters at the Canadian Hurricane Centre say winds are strongest to the right of the storm in the Annapolis Valley (topping 140 km/h) and rain has been heaviest to the left of the storm in central and southern New Brunswick (over 150 mm).

More than 200,000 customers have lost power in the region with social media users reporting flooding and downed trees in Saint John, Fredericton and Halifax.

In Greater Moncton, periods of heavy rain and gusty winds have been ongoing since this morning with leaves, branches and even a few trees coming down.


Polar vortex slowly retreating

An icy Lake Michigan with Chicago in the distance, 07 Jan 2014 (Twitter)

An icy Lake Michigan with Chicago in the distance, 07 Jan 2014 (Twitter)

The good news is the polar vortex is starting to retreat northward which means January temperatures are returning to more seasonal values across much of Canada and the United States.

The coldest weather in two decades enveloped much of the continent this week.

Major cities such as Chicago set new record lows when the temperature overnight dropped to -27°C and the daytime high only reached -19°C.

The lowest reading in the mainland U.S. was reported at International Falls, Minnesota, where the thermometer fell to -42°C.