Brief heat wave coming

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Warm weather in Ontario heading to the Maritimes, 17 May 2017 (TWN)

A high pressure system is pushing warm, southerly air into the Maritimes with highs approaching 30 C tomorrow in New Brunswick.

Environment Canada says humidex values could climb to 39 which has led to a Level 1 Heat Alert for Fredericton and St. Stephen.

The provincial health department issues this alert when anyone vulnerable to the heat may be affected.

Greater Moncton could break a record on Thursday if the temperature reaches the forecast high of 28 C.

April 2017 – Spring sputters

Budding trees in Fairview Knoll Park, Moncton, 30 April 2017 (Dearing)

Spring seldom arrives on time in New Brunswick and this year is no exception even though April was actually warmer than normal in Greater Moncton.

The month can be broken into four segments – cold in the beginning, then warm, turning cold again and finally warm again near the end.

A consistent snow cover began on 27 November and disappeared briefly in late January before finally melting for the season by 10 April.

Precipitation overall was below average with much less snow than normal.

APRIL 2017 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH 10.5 C

Average LOW -0.8 C

AVERAGE 4.9 C (about 1.4 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH 21.8 C (27 April)

Extreme LOW -7.7 C (01, 19 April)

RAINFALL 42.5 mm (about 30 percent BELOW normal)

SNOWFALL 6.8 cm (about 75 percent BELOW normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Temperatures surpass 20 C in the Maritimes

Signs of spring, downtown Moncton, 10 April 2017 (Dearing)


For the first time this spring, temperatures in the Maritime Provinces climbed to 20 C and higher yesterday.

In Greater Moncton, the thermometer hit 20.6 C but wasn’t quite as warm as the record of 26.7 C from 1945.

Grand Manan Island was the hotspot in New Brunswick with a new record high of 20.8 C.

Several locations in Nova Scotia were also the warmest so far this season with 23.1 C recorded at Halifax Stanfield Airport although it was much cooler in downtown Halifax.

A new record was set in Kejimkujik Park at 25.8 C which was the hotspot in Canada.

Record highs in the Maritimes

Outdoor thermometer in NE Moncton, 07 April 2017 (Dearing)


Astronomical spring officially arrived almost three weeks ago but it finally arrived in the Maritimes today with record highs throughout the region.

In Greater Moncton, the temperature climbed to 17.3 C – the warmest high of 2017 – which surpassed the previous record of 15.6 C from 1962.

It hasn’t been this warm since 22 October when the thermometer reached 20.5 C.

The hot spot in New Brunswick was 17.7 C in Kouchibouguac, it reached 16.7 C in Stanhope, Prince Edward Island and 21.1 C in Greenwood, Nova Scotia.

The highest temperatures in Canada were found in Saskatchewan today with a high of 24 C in Regina.

Record warmth in central, eastern United States

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Cherry blossoms in bloom, Washington, DC, USA, 02 March 2017 (Instagram)

During January and February, the city of Chicago only had a few centimetres of snow with no measurable amount on the ground for the first time in 146 years.

Record highs were broken from New England to Texas where temperatures recently soared into the high 20’s C causing trees and flowers to bloom ahead of schedule.

The cherry blossoms in Washington, DC could reach their peak on 14 March which would be the earliest.since officials began keeping track in 1921.

Climatologists say much of the central and eastern United States had a very warm winter with February 2017 being the second warmest in 123 years of records.

UPDATE – The cherry blossoms in Washington, DC actually reached their peak on 25 March after being delayed by a cold snap and snow.

Weather Network unveils spring forecast

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A great deal of snow has melted in Southeast New Brunswick recently thanks to some spring-like temperatures.

But what does the upcoming spring season really have in store for us?

In its forecast for March, April and May, the Weather Network says we can expect slightly above normal temperatures overall.

Meteorologist Michael Carter says spring is a transitional season which means a back and forth between cold and warm.

Carter says precipitation is expected to be near normal for our region.

“We certainly are not out of the woods yet when it comes to snowfall. We’ll still have a few opportunities for impactful snowfall as we move into March and early April we can certainly see that continuing,” he notes.

Carter says we expect spring rain to really ramp up in late April and May but the amounts should not be excessive.

Great snow melt underway

Snow melting in Riverview, 24 Feb 2017 (Dearing)

Mild temperatures have been melting lots of snow in Southeast New Brunswick this week.

Greater Moncton now has about 50 cm on the ground compared to more than 110 cm only a week ago.

The daytime high climbed to 11.5 C at the airport on Friday but a private weather station recorded a maximum of 14.6 C at Jones Lake.

Environment Canada is forecasting the warmth to continue for the next few days with a sudden cold snap expected to arrive later in the week.

Another rollercoaster ride!

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The January wolf moon over downtown Moncton, 11 Jan 2017 (Dearing)

Greater Moncton is experiencing another see-saw temperature pattern this week.

After the thermometer fell to -23.2 early Tuesday (coldest yet this winter and coldest since February 2015), a Colorado Low brought milder air and rain to Southeast New Brunswick today with a balmy high of 7.7 C.

But an Arctic air mass is pushing in again by the weekend and Environment Canada says a drop to -19 C is forecast by early Saturday.

By early next week, temperatures are set to get warmer again and climb above freezing.

2016 was warm in Greater Moncton

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Clockwise from top left: Jan 2016 Moncton, May 2016 Moncton, Aug 2016 Kouchibouguac N.P., Oct 2016 Moncton

The average annual temperature for 2016 in Greater Moncton was 6.4 C which was one degree above the 1981-2010 period according to data from Environment Canada.

Precipitation was below normal with 995 mm recorded (1200 mm is average over the same thirty years) broken down as 689 mm of rain and 297 cm of snow.

The highest temperature of the year was 30.5 C on 28 July while the lowest was -22.1 C recorded on 17 December.

The growing season stretched from mid-May to early October which gave Moncton about 142 frost-free days, slightly higher than the average of 127.

Canada’s Top 10 of 2016

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RCMP officer in burnt neighbourhood, Fort McMurray, AB, 05 May 2016 (Alberta RCMP)

From the horrible wildfires which destroyed parts of Fort McMurray, Alberta to the winter that wasn’t to a warm, dry summer which led to drought in areas of Eastern Canada, 2016 was certainly noteworthy for major weather events.

  1. Fort McMurray’s “Fire Beast”
  2. Super El Niño Cancels Winter – 2nd warmest Canada-wide ever
  3. August Long Weekend Storm on the Prairies… Big and Costly
  4. A Summer to Remember in the East
  5. November’s Heat Wave and December’s Deep Freeze
  6. Arctic Sea Ice Going, Going… Break-up earlier/Freeze-up later
  7. Wild Summer Prairie Weather
  8. A Tale of Two Springs – Cold East and Warm West
  9. Thanksgiving Day Atlantic Weather Bomb
  10. Southwest Ontario’s $100 Million September Gusher                                               (Courtesy Environment Canada)