Powerful winds pummel Eastern Arctic

A powerful storm brought destructive winds to the Eastern Arctic with gusts up to 140 km/h in Nunavut, Nunavik (northern Quebec) and northern Labrador.

The power was knocked out in Iqaluit where residents were cleaning up debris and assessing roof damage on some buildings.

Environment Canada reported a peak wind gust of 124 km/h in Iqaluit but that was still below the record of 156 km/h from 1960.

Forecasters say the cyclogenesis or weather bomb featured rapidly dropping central pressure which generated strong winds.

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January 2018 – Turbulent!

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The Petitcodiac River in Moncton looking toward Dieppe, 28 January 2018 (Dearing)

The first month of 2018 proved to be quite a roller coaster ride in Southeast New Brunswick.

Bitter cold to begin January was briefly erased by a fast-moving ‘bomb cyclone’ until another Arctic blast sunk the low to -22.3 C with a bitter wind chill of -36.

A record thaw saw the thermometer climb to 16.7 C in Greater Moncton – the highest ever in January – and a new all-time provincial high of 17.3 C in Sussex.

Precipitation was above average overall with near normal snowfall – 25 cm was the heaviest snow event on 30-31 – and about twice as much rainfall.

JANUARY 2018 ALMANAC (at Greater Moncton Int’l Airport, 1981-2010)

Average HIGH  -2.0 C

Average LOW  -12.6 C

AVERAGE  -7.4 C (1.5 degrees ABOVE normal)

Extreme HIGH  16.7 C (13 Jan, new all-time monthly high)

Extreme LOW  -22.3 C (07 Jan)

RAINFALL  53.3 mm (almost 50 percent ABOVE normal)

SNOWFALL  77.2 cm (NEAR normal)

(Data courtesy Environment Canada)

Greater Moncton spared worst of storm

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Powerful storm surge causes flooding along the waterfront in Halifax, NS, 05 Jan 2018 (Twitter)

The ‘bomb cyclone’ or ‘snow hurricane’ – featuring a dramatic drop in atmospheric pressure when warm and cold air collided – has left the Maritimes and spared Southeast New Brunswick from the worst of its fury.

While strong winds were a factor throughout the region, Greater Moncton received less snow compared to further north and west.

To the south and east, more rain fell along with hurricane-force winds (up to 200 km/h gusts in western Cape Breton) which created powerful storm surges causing flooding along the coast.

Here are some totals from Environment Canada and local estimates:

  • Greater Moncton Airport  14 cm snow, 10 mm rain, 91 km/h wind gust
  • Bathurst  58 cm snow, 80 km/h wind gust
  • Fredericton  30 cm snow, 78 km/h wind gust
  • Saint John  5 cm snow, 20 mm rain, 87 km/h wind gust
  • Halifax Stanfield Airport  40 mm rain, trace snow, 122 km/h wind gust

The storm may have departed but Arctic air has filtered back into the Maritimes which will mean a bitterly cold weekend.

Major storm moves across Maritimes

 

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“Bomb cyclone” south of the Maritimes, 04 Jan 2017 (earth.nullscholl.net)

An powerful Nor’easter has arrived in the Maritimes with strong, gusty winds bringing heavy rain for Nova Scotia and a snow/ice pellets/rain for New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.

Winds were hurricane-force in the Halifax region at 117 km/h and thundersnow – a thunderstorm with snow – was recorded in Sydney.

Storm surge warnings are in place along the Atlantic coast as water levels will be high enough to cause some coastal flooding.

In Greater Moncton, snow began falling around noon with freezing rain/ice pellets by late afternoon and rain by evening.

Environment Canada says the storm will move out of the region by Friday afternoon but more frigid air is filtering in behind the system which will mean a very cold weekend.

Damaging winds in latest storm

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Part of a trampoline blew into power lines, Quispamsis, NB, 30 Dec 2013 (NB Power/Twitter)


Strong winds with gusts of more than 100 km/h in parts of New Brunswick knocked out power to more than 20,000 customers at the peak of the storm.

The so-called “weather bomb” resulted after two low pressure systems – one from the west and the other from the south – merged over the Maritimes.

Nova Scotia got pounding rain, wind and rough surf while New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island had a combination of snow, rain and gusty winds.

Greater Moncton received about 5 cm snow and 10 mm of rain along with wind gusts up to 89 km/h bringing down tree many branches.

Wild weather!

At the height of the storm Moncton, 08 Dec 2011 (TWN)

The so-called “weather bomb” which entered New Brunswick almost as quickly as it exited yesterday, left behind record-breaking temperatures and almost hurricane-like wind gusts.

In Greater Moncton, wind gusts peaked at 81 km/h while the temperature, albeit briefly, climbed to 13.6 C (breaking the old record of  13.3 C from 1951) before quickly retreating to single digits.

The region recorded 25.0 mm of rain while areas to the north, including Bathurst, recorded 26.0 cm of snow.

Wind gusts were even higher in Nova Scotia with Halifax Stanfield Airport recording 104 km/h and Sydney at 111 km/h.

Weather bomb on the way!

Courtesy TWN

A so-called “weather bomb” is heading toward Atlantic Canada as its makes its way up from the American Northeast.

Environment Canada says an intense low pressure system will bring, rain, snow and strong winds to the region beginning tonight.

Greater Moncton is under a rainfall warning – with up to 50 mm expected – and a wind warning – with strong westerly gusts up to 100 km/h possible by late Thursday.

Snowfall warnings are in place for parts of northern New Brunswick with up to 25 cm of snow possible by Thursday night.

Early snow in Newfoundland!

Snow in Gander, NL, 26 Oct 11 (TWN)

Newfoundland received an early taste of Old Man Winter today when snow fell over parts of the island.

Forecasters have described the storm as a “weather bomb” with strong, gusty winds bringing lots of rain and snow.

Wind gusts up to 100 km/h hit eastern Newfoundland today along with 40 mm of rain while up to 25 cm of snow could fall in central and western Newfoundland.

Greater Moncton received wind gusts up to 50 km/h this afternoon from the same system.