Weather Network unveils summer forecast

TWN Summer 2019

After a cold and wet spring in New Brunswick, what will summer be like?

The Weather Network has unveiled its summer 2019 forecast and if you were hoping for warmer temperatures, it appears you may have to wait a little longer.

TWN suggests the season will be changeable and humid with cool weather in June but warmer than normal temperatures arriving in July stretching into August.

Extended periods of dry weather could lead to short term drought in parts of the Maritimes but overall precipitation will likely be near normal.

What about the spring 2019 forecast from The Weather Network?

TWN noted a cold wave in early March would be followed by a warmer pattern later in the month with more consistent spring-like weather by early April.

Both temperatures and precipitation were expected to be near normal.

So was the seasonal forecast accurate?

While early March was cold in Greater Moncton with a bitter low of -20.1 C, a warmer pattern never really developed except for a brief shot of warmth at month end.

April had some warmth in the middle but that fizzled near the end and while May started off strong, a cold pattern held steady for the second half of the month.

Precipitation was below seasonal in March, well above average in April and slightly above normal for May.

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Weather Network unveils winter forecast

wintertemp19
The Weather Network believes the harsh winter conditions this November in New Brunswick are just a preview of the upcoming season.

Temperatures will likely be below normal this season but periods of mild weather can still be expected.

An active storm track along the Atlantic coast will mean many systems delivering above average precipitation including snow, rain and freezing rain.

A developing El Nino should bring a warmer, drier winter for Western Canada and a colder, wetter winter from the Great Lakes to Atlantic Canada.

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Summer arrives!

summer solstice

The summer solstice officially arrived in New Brunswick at 7:07am ADT today.

This is the longest day of the year with 15 hours and 46 minutes of daylight in Moncton.

The sun is directly over the Tropic of Cancer and it will now begin moving south toward the equator which means days will be getting shorter again – by three seconds starting tomorrow.

As for summer weather predictions for the region, the Weather Network is suggesting July and August will have slightly above normal temperatures with high humidity.

Environment Canada believes there is an 80 percent chance of higher than average temperatures and a 40 percent chance of below normal precipitation.

TWN unveils summer forecast

summer2018
Spring has sputtered in New Brunswick – it was nowhere to be found in March, finally appeared in late April and although May has had a few warm days, the month is still running slightly below normal in Greater Moncton.

So what about summer?

In its seasonal forecast, the Weather Network believes a cool June should give way to more consistent warm weather during July and August.

A humid summer is expected which may result in warmer than normal temperatures at night – overnight lows average about 12 C.

While periods of dry weather are expected, heavy showers and thunderstorms should bring rain totals to near normal for the season.

Weather Network unveils summer forecast

2017summer
The Weather Network has released its summer 2017 forecast covering June, July and August.

A changeable summer is expected across Atlantic Canada with extended periods of above seasonal and below seasonal weather.

The southern Maritimes which includes Greater Moncton and Southeast New Brunswick and possibly into southern Newfoundland have the best chance of seeing temperatures tip to the warm side of normal.

Meanwhile, cooler than normal temperatures are expected to be more persistent across eastern Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

Near normal rainfall is expected this summer except for western and northern New Brunswick.

There is the potential for a couple of systems to tap into subtropical or tropical moisture and bring above normal rainfall to parts of the region.

Weather Network unveils spring forecast

2017spring

A great deal of snow has melted in Southeast New Brunswick recently thanks to some spring-like temperatures.

But what does the upcoming spring season really have in store for us?

In its forecast for March, April and May, the Weather Network says we can expect slightly above normal temperatures overall.

Meteorologist Michael Carter says spring is a transitional season which means a back and forth between cold and warm.

Carter says precipitation is expected to be near normal for our region.

“We certainly are not out of the woods yet when it comes to snowfall. We’ll still have a few opportunities for impactful snowfall as we move into March and early April we can certainly see that continuing,” he notes.

Carter says we expect spring rain to really ramp up in late April and May but the amounts should not be excessive.

Meteorological winter begins

30nov2016

NE Moncton after first major snowfall of season, 30 Nov 2016 (Dearing)

It’s beginning to look like winter in Greater Moncton so it’s timely 01 December marks the start of meteorological winter which also includes January and February.

The Old Farmers Almanac and The Weather Network have suggested much of the country including Atlantic Canada can expect a “classic Canadian winter.”

Let’s look back at the last three meteorological winters to see how they compare:

2015-16 in Greater Moncton

December 2015, average temperature -0.4°C (4.4°C ABOVE normal), snowfall 96.4 cm, rainfall 56.3 mm

January 2016, average temperature -6.1°C (2.8°C ABOVE normal), snowfall 53.6 cm, rainfall 23.8 mm

February 2016, average temperature -4.4°C (3.4°C ABOVE normal), snowfall 79.6 cm, rainfall 33.3 mm

2014-2015 in Greater Moncton

December 2014, average temperature -2.1°C (2.7°C ABOVE normal), snowfall  10.9 cm, rainfall  246.6 mm (new December record)

January 2015, average temperature -10.2°C (1.3°C BELOW normal), snowfall 153.0 cm, rainfall 33.7 mm

February 2015, average temperature -13.6°C (6°C BELOW normal), snowfall 168.6 cm, rainfall 3.2 mm

2013-2014 in Greater Moncton

December 2013, average temperature -7.4°C (2.6°C BELOW normal), snowfall 130.8 cm, rainfall 62.6 mm

January 2014, average temperature -7.3°C (1.6°C ABOVE normal), snowfall  32.8 cm, rainfall 83.6 mm

February 2014, average temperature -7.1°C (0.5°C ABOVE normal),  snowfall  92.7 cm, rainfall 39.4 mm

Weather Network unveils winter forecast

winter16-17
As snow flurries began falling in Greater Moncton today, the Weather Network unveiled its winter forecast covering the months of December, January and February.

TWN says although typical see-saws are expected, temperatures should be near normal for Southeast New Brunswick with daytime highs averaging just below freezing at about -2 C.

Precipitation will likely be above normal for the region but TWN meteorologists say the storm track will vary which means not all of it will fall as snow like what happened two years ago.

Overall across Canada, TWN says we should expect a classic Canadian winter in 2016-17.

Second Nor’easter in a week swipes N.B.

Courtesy The Weather Network

Courtesy The Weather Network

Many New Brunswickers had just finished shoveling in the north or drying out in the south following the last Nor’easter when another storm blew in with heavy rain and snow.

Environment Canada says Greater Moncton had a peak wind gust of 80 km/h on Saturday along with 30 mm of rain and 0.4 cm of snow.

Bathurst recorded 17 mm of rain and 10 cm snow with more of the white falling in Quebec’s Gaspe peninsula.

Record scorcher in Manitoba

Courtesy The Weather Network

Courtesy The Weather Network

An unstable air mass brought excessive heat to Manitoba yesterday where it climbed to a record 35.4 C in Swan River – the hotspot in Canada.

Winnipeg was toasty at a record 33.3 C and even Thompson in the province’s far north was very warm at 30.2 C.

But the heat was short-lived when severe thunderstorms rolled across the province and into Ontario.

Temperatures ranged from the high 20’s in Northern Ontario to the low 20’s in Southern Ontario.